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Trump loses case meant to silence former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman
Trump’s campaign accused Manigault Newman of violating a nondisclosure agreement, but an arbitrator invalidated the agreement, saying it was too vague
1 h
washingtonpost.com
John Terry, appeals court judge, dies at 88
He served 23 years on the D.C. Court of Appeals. Before that, he spent many years as chief of the appellate division of the U.S. attorney’s office.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
Republicans remain much more resistant to coronavirus vaccines than Black Americans
Incessant efforts by Republicans to suggest otherwise notwithstanding.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
3 big takeaways from the Mark Milley hearing
A firm defense from Milley on his calls to China, increasing questions about Biden's explanation of the Afghanistan withdrawal, and a tough day for Trump's Taliban deal.
3 h
washingtonpost.com
Tucker Carlson ties his vaccine fearmongering to a core Republican insecurity
To be fair, his "make Republicans angry again" mantra isn’t quite as catchy as MAGA.
4 h
washingtonpost.com
As Trump hints at 2024 comeback, democracy advocates fear a ‘worst-case scenario’ for the country
Scholars grapple with what would happen if the former president runs again — and wins.
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washingtonpost.com
Gen. Milley hearing live updates: Top military officer to face questions on Afghanistan exit, Trump revelations
Mark A. Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, testifies today before the Senate Armed Services Committee as it examines the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.
7 h
washingtonpost.com
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms: ‘A lot of people only understand a portion of what it takes to govern’
The mayor reflects on public service, what the social justice movement ushered in and the unique leadership of women.
8 h
washingtonpost.com
Biden’s claim that his spending plan ‘costs zero dollars’
Biden promises to pass a deficit-neutral plan but he's already in the hole because of the infrastructure bill.
washingtonpost.com
California will now mail ballots to voters in all elections, in permanent extension of pandemic-era practice
washingtonpost.com
President Biden gets a coronavirus vaccine booster shot
The president was adhering to new guidance issued last week from the CDC which, after a torturous and at times contradictory process, recommended extra doses for many who got the immunization more than six months ago.
washingtonpost.com
40 years later, a dwindling band of Iran hostages awaits a promised payment
The 1979 Iran hostage crisis gripped the country and may have cost a president his job. Now the Americans who spent 444 days in captivity and inspired a nation to tie yellow ribbons of support feel abandoned.
washingtonpost.com
The grim reality of a partisan pandemic
We'll probably never know exactly how uneven the effects of the pandemic have been.
washingtonpost.com
How Republicans learned to stop worrying and embrace ‘replacement theory’ — by name
They used to talk about it in broad terms — even though the idea was commonly used by racists. Now they're just embracing the label.
washingtonpost.com
Texas GOP lawmakers propose redistricting map protecting congressional incumbents but avoiding a new Latino-majority seat
Lawmakers in the state Senate, making the first move to redraw House maps, chose to strengthen incumbents against future demographic change rather than draw districts that might be more competitive but risky.
washingtonpost.com
Rep. Jayapal has emerged as a forceful leader of House liberals. This week will test what policy priorities she can deliver.
Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) has emerged as the most powerful House liberal by aggressively representing the priorities of her caucus and pushing leaders not to acquiesce to the demands of moderates in politically competitive districts whom liberals argue too often stand in the way of progress.
washingtonpost.com
Five conspiracy theories that remain unproven, despite what you might have heard
Efforts to declare conspiracy theories proven by unrelated evidence are having a moment.
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washingtonpost.com
A day-by-day guide to Congress’s high-stakes budget week
Congress needs to figure out how to keep the government open by midnight Thursday, raise the debt ceiling to avoid an economic catastrophe, pass a bipartisan infrastructure bill and try to vote on Democrats’ major social policy and climate change legislation.
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washingtonpost.com
The misinformation epidemic among unvaccinated Republicans, in one stat
The median unvaccinated Republicans believes the vaccines have effectively zero efficacy in preventing hospitalizations. This is not the case with unvaccinated Democrats.
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washingtonpost.com
Partisan hostility has surged, offering a useful political refuge
Defending the enemy of your enemy.
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After Pearl Harbor and 9/11, Americans came together. Have we lost that capacity?
Partisan division and a yawning cultural gulf threaten the nation’s ability to unite in a crisis.
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washingtonpost.com
Biden’s SBA nominee would be the country’s highest-ranking Muslim. The GOP won’t let him get a vote.
Republicans have accused Dilawar Syed, President Biden's nominee as deputy administrator of the Small Business Administration, of being anti-Semitic, but Jewish groups have countered that the claims are anti-Musliim.
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washingtonpost.com
New York’s redistricting tests Democratic opposition to gerrymandering
The state, controlled by Democrats, could make up for gerrymandering expected in Republican states if it draws extreme lines — the kind it has railed against in the past.
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washingtonpost.com
Rep. Liz Cheney says ‘I was wrong’ to have opposed same-sex marriage before
Cheney’s 2013 condemnation of same-sex marriage caused a rift with her sister, who is a lesbian. The two have now reconciled, the congresswoman from Wyoming said.
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washingtonpost.com
Frances ‘Sissy’ Farenthold, lodestar for Texas liberals, dies at 94
She lost two bids for governor but became a leader among Texas progressives and one of the nation’s most prominent feminists.
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washingtonpost.com
40 years later, a dwindling band of Iran hostages awaits a promised payment
The 1979 Iran hostage crisis gripped the country and may have cost a president his job. Now the Americans who spent 444 days in captivity and inspired a nation to tie yellow ribbons of support feel abandoned.
2 d
washingtonpost.com