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News : NPR
News : NPR
Biden Is Catholic. He Also Supports Abortion Rights. Here's What That Could Mean
President Biden is only the nation's second Catholic president. He also supports abortion rights — a position at odds with his church.
5 h
npr.org
Fauci Relishes A 'Hallelujah' Moment
Dr. Anthony Fauci, now President Biden's chief medical adviser on COVID-19, says he rejoiced when the new president said that "science and truth" would guide the nation's policies toward the pandemic.
7 h
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Who Wants To Be A Billionaire? $1 Billion Winning Lottery Ticket Sold In Michigan
The odds of winning the top prize were 1 in over 300 million.
8 h
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Veteran Broadcaster Larry King Dies At 87
With his trademark suspenders and Brooklyn-accented baritone, King spoke with world leaders, celebrities, authors, scientists, athletes — everyone.
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What Trump's Declassified Asia Strategy May Mean For U.S.-China Relations Under Biden
Critics say by publicly releasing the document, the Trump administration was trying to bind the Biden administration to its own policies, while confirming China's worst fears about U.S. intentions.
npr.org
Longtime Illinois House Speaker Steps Down Amid Corruption Probe
The nation's longest serving state house speaker in modern history, Democrat Michael Madigan from Illinois, stepped down from the speakership. He was driven from power by a federal corruption probe.
npr.org
New York City's Vaccine Outreach Aims To Dispel Mistrust Among Communities Of Color
New York City is trying to build trust for coronavirus vaccines by doing pop-up food banks and flu vaccine clinics at churches and community centers in minority neighborhoods.
npr.org
After Capitol Riot, Law Enforcement Officials Try To Remove Extremism From The Ranks
NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Houston Police Department's Chief Art Acevedo about what can be done to root out extremism from law enforcement agencies.
npr.org
How Biden's Administration Is Prioritizing The COVID-19 Pandemic
The Biden Administration is taking a far more aggressive, nationally coordinated approach to the pandemic. We hear more about how it plans to support vaccination efforts.
npr.org
Parents With Disabilities Face Extra Hurdles With Kids' Remote Schooling
Parents with disabilities often face extra issues with remote learning. A deaf mom whose first language is American Sign Language is navigating the challenge of monitoring her hearing child's work.
npr.org
Opinion: Joe Biden's Lifetime Of Experience
NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the life and career of the nation's newest, and oldest, president.
npr.org
Wuhan's Lockdown Memories One Year Later: Pride, Anger, Deep Pain
January 23 marks the one-year anniversary of the strict lockdown imposed on the first epicenter of COVID-19. Here's what residents have to say about their experience.
npr.org
The Vaccine Rollout Will Take Time. Here's What The U.S. Can Do Now To Save Lives
With the virus still raging in the U.S., public health experts say we can't afford to just wait around for the vaccine. They share advice for what communities can do now to slow the death toll.
npr.org
Democrats Weigh Whether Iowa Should Stay First In Line For 2024 Election
Iowa's decades-long lock on the nominating process has been under threat since last year's disastrous caucus, when results were delayed for days due in part to a faulty smartphone app.
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USAGM Chief Fires Trump Allies Over Radio Free Europe And Other Networks
The acting head of the U.S. Agency for Global Media fired the presidents and boards over three not-for-profit international networks who were appointed by an ally of former President Trump.
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Engine Failure And Crew Error Responsible For Fatal 2020 Crash in Afghanistan
An Air Force investigation revealed that the left engine of the aircraft failed. The two pilots onboard mistakenly shut down the right engine and were unable to glide back to base.
npr.org
Coronavirus FAQ: Why Am I Suddenly Hearing So Much About KF94 Masks?
There are N95s, reserved for health workers. There are KN95s, which you can buy easily ... except that quality may vary. And now South Korea's KF94's are getting a lot of buzz.
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Refugee Resettlement Coordinator Is Hopeful For What Comes Next Under Biden
Corine Dehabey runs a group that helps resettle refugees in Toledo, Ohio. She says her organization is "hopeful" and "excited" about Biden's plan to raise the number of refugees allowed into the U.S.
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Twitter Bans Account Linked To Iran's Supreme Leader
An image that seems to threaten former President Donald Trump has prompted Twitter to deactivate an account linked to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. The image also appears on Khameini's website.
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Moderna And Pfizer Need To Nearly Double COVID-19 Vaccine Deliveries To Meet Goals
The two companies making COVID-19 vaccines each promised to deliver 100 million doses to the federal government by the end of March. So far, they appear to be running behind.
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Biden Administration Tables Trump's Citizenship Data Request For Redistricting
Trump officials had directed the Census Bureau to use government records to produce data that a GOP strategist said would be "advantageous to Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites" during redistricting.
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New 007 Release Delayed For 3rd Time As Pandemic Continues To Batter Film Industry
No Time To Die, the 25th film in the James Bond saga, is scheduled to premiere in theaters Oct. 8, a year and a half past its original debut date, MGM said Friday.
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Coronavirus Crisis Gets 'Even Worse' In Brazilian Amazon City Of Manaus
Another surge in coronavirus cases has collapsed Manaus' health system, leading hospitals to run out of beds and oxygen for patients. It's also having a deadly fallout in nearby communities.
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'Until Everyone Is Safe, No One Is Safe': Africa Awaits The COVID-19 Vaccine
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient and former president of Liberia, says much of Africa may be left out until 2022. "We don't have the resources. It's as simple as that," she says.
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Fast-Growing Alternative To Facebook, Twitter Finds Right-Wing Surge 'Messy'
Social network MeWe began as a privacy-focused alternative to Facebook. Trump supporters and right-wing groups disillusioned with mainstream social media have flocked to it since the Jan. 6 riot.
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Lloyd Austin Confirmed As Secretary of Defense, Becomes First Black Pentagon Chief
Austin's near-unanimous confirmation came despite concerns raised on both sides of the aisle that he hadn't been out of uniform for the legally-mandated minimum seven-year period.
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Watch Live: What's Ahead For The COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout?
As the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines unfolds in the U.S., numerous questions around distribution, supply, hesitancy and efficacy persist. Experts from Harvard and the CDC tackle these questions.
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DNC Chairman Jaime Harrison Wants To Build The 'Next Generation' Of Democratic Talent
With President Biden and other Democratic leaders in their 70s and 80s, the new chairman of the Democratic National Committee says recruiting younger candidates will be among his top priorities.
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Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution
Germany's Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution has wrapped up a two-year investigation into the Alternative for Germany. The party's far-right branch is already under surveillance.
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NFL Invites 7,500 Health Care Workers To The Super Bowl
Most of the invitees work in the central Florida area, though all of the NFL's 32 clubs will pick health care workers from their communities to receive free tickets to the sport's biggest game.
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