Tools
Change country:
News : NPR
News : NPR
Liz Cheney just lost her House seat, but her fight against Trump continues
Liz Cheney's sustained criticism of former President Trump made her one of his top political targets. She has pledged her chief goal is to make sure he never wins back the White House.
2 h
npr.org
Biden signs sweeping climate, health care, tax bill into law
The legislation has been a year in the making, with tense negotiations leading to a narrower spending package that focuses on climate investments and health care costs.
8 h
npr.org
Scotland becomes the first country to offer tampons and pads for free
Studies have shown that a significant number of people struggle to afford menstrual products, and going without can cause people to miss school or work.
8 h
npr.org
Millions of Americans will soon be able to buy hearing aids without a prescription
A new FDA rule allows adults with perceived mild to moderate hearing loss to buy hearing aids over the counter. Efforts to make them more affordable and accessible have been in the works for years.
8 h
npr.org
Former California Rep. TJ Cox faces over two dozen federal fraud charges
The single-term Democrat allegedly participated in multiple fraud schemes, including one involving his 2018 run for Congress.
9 h
npr.org
A$AP Rocky faces 2 felony assault charges from an incident in Hollywood last year
Rapper A$AP Rocky, whose real name is Rakim Mayers, has his arraignment in a Los Angeles court on Wednesday.
npr.org
Rep. Adam Schiff weighs in on the raid at Trump's Mar-a-Lago home
Schiff reflects on the significance of the top-secret documents seized from Trump's residence. He led the first impeachment and serves on the House's committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection.
npr.org
$3.9 billion in debt is canceled for former students of ITT Tech
The cancelation in federal student debt for 208,000 borrowers came after authorities found "widespread and pervasive misrepresentations" at the defunct college chain, the Education Department said.
npr.org
TS/SCI: What an acronym reveals about the files seized from Mar-a-Lago
Most people have heard of top secret documents. After the FBI seized 11 sets of classified documents from former President Donald Trump's residence, a less familiar security designation came to light.
npr.org
To encourage fans to vote, the NBA won't hold games on Election Day
The National Basketball Association announced Tuesday that there are no games scheduled for November 8 in an effort to encourage fans to vote in the 2022 midterms.
npr.org
Over the river from a Russian-occupied nuclear plant, a Ukrainian town fears a spill
The small town of Nikopol, Ukraine, sits across the river from the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant. Attacks are causing serious alarm for the community.
npr.org
Jill Biden tests positive for COVID-19
The first lady will remain at a private residence in South Carolina and isolate from others for at least five days per CDC guidance.
npr.org
More than 2 million baby swings and rockers are recalled after an infant's death
4moms is recalling MamaRoos and RockaRoos due to entanglement hazards from straps that hang down from the rockers and swings when not in use. At least one baby has died as a result of asphyxiation.
npr.org
Actor Ezra Miller is getting mental health treatment after erratic behavior
Miller was arrested twice in Hawaii, including for disorderly conduct and harassment at a karaoke bar. The second incident was for second-degree assault. He also faces a burglary charge in Vermont.
npr.org
How can we help humans thrive trillions of years from now? This philosopher has a plan
William MacAskill's book, What We Owe the Future, urges today's humans to protect future humans — an idea he calls longtermism. Here are a few of his hardly modest proposals.
npr.org
Nipsey Hussle gets Hollywood star on what would have been his 37th birthday
The late rapper's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is the 2,729th placed to date.
npr.org
Title X advocates worry that birth control may go the same way as abortion
A Supreme Court ruling overturned Roe v. Wade. Now there's a big push to increase funding for Title X, a federal program that offers birth control and other reproductive care to low-income patients.
npr.org
A man who held up a bank demanding his own money becomes an unlikely hero
Many in Lebanon can't access their life savings because of the economic crisis. A hostage-taker in Beirut surrendered in exchange for some of his funds, which he needed for his father's medical bills.
npr.org
The U.K. approved omicron-specific booster shots. They're coming to the U.S. soon
In the U.S., officials have asked vaccine makers to target BA.5, rather than the original omicron strain. That has delayed the boosters' development — but officials hope they will be more effective.
npr.org
Liz Cheney is facing a likely primary defeat in Wyoming. Here's why
Cheney, who has spoken out clearly against former President Donald Trump, is down by 20 points in primary polls — and her approval ratings are in the tank among Wyoming Republicans.
npr.org
Focusing on diversity and inclusion, gravel bike racing welcomes all to this sport
Not just for the super fit, gravel bike racing has exploded into one of the most popular forms of biking in the U.S. Organizers have worked so that everyone feels included and welcome.
npr.org
Here are the key primary election results from Wyoming
Voting concludes Tuesday in the Wyoming primary elections, including notable races for governor and a House congressional district.
npr.org
Sarah Palin faces Alaska voters again in a special election for Congress
Over a decade after she ran for vice president and then resigned as Alaska governor, Palin is in both a special election for U.S. House on Tuesday and a primary for the full term starting next year.
npr.org
Colleges ease COVID-19 restrictions as fall semester begins for millions of students
Requirements to test and mask and be vaccinated are becoming less common as colleges shift away from treating COVID-19 as an emergency.
npr.org
Buy a rural hospital for $100? Investors pick up struggling institutions for pennies
Some rural hospitals are in such bad shape, they're selling for next to nothing. One company is snapping several distressed or closed hospitals in rural Tennessee, hoping to turn a profit.
npr.org
Here are the key primary election results from Alaska
Voting concludes Tuesday in the Alaska primary elections, including notable races for governor, Senate and a special election for the House seat to fill the remainder of late Rep. Don Young's term.
npr.org
2 monkeypox variants will no longer be named after regions, for ethical reasons
Subsequent variants of monkeypox will be named using Roman numerals for the clade, and lowercase letters for the subclade.
npr.org
How to keep yourself — and your pets — safe from monkeypox
Animal carriers of the virus include various rodents, dogs, primates, hedgehogs and shrews, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
npr.org
Australia's former prime minister Scott Morrison defends secretly taking extra powers
The former prime minister defended his actions, saying they were a safeguard during the coronavirus pandemic and that he would have made the appointments public had he needed to use the powers.
npr.org
Colorado River cuts expected for Arizona, Nevada and Mexico
Projections for Lake Mead water levels and the deadline for water-use cuts are presenting Western states with unprecedented challenges on how to plan for a drier future.
npr.org