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  1. No, the Ohio Race Wasn't About Hillary v. Bernie or 'Evil Money' | Opinion If progressives want greater success in Democratic Party primaries, they can learn from the man who has given their movement so much energy in recent years.
    newsweek.com
  2. How to Buy the Telfar and White Castle Uniform Collaboration Luxury fashion house Telfar has teamed up with fast-food chain White Castle to design a celebratory 100th anniversary uniform for restaurant staff.
    newsweek.com
  3. Belarus sprinter who feared reprisals at home reaches Poland A Belarusian Olympic sprinter who feared reprisals at home after criticizing her coaches at the Tokyo Games has reached safety in Poland following a dramatic standoff.
    foxnews.com
  4. British police arrest 11 people in UK hate crime investigation following Euro 2020 final British police have arrested 11 people across the UK in connection with episodes of racist abuse targeting England football players on social media following the team's Euro 2020 final loss to Italy.
    edition.cnn.com
  5. These reality shows are sending regular people to space The hottest new reality show isn't set in a house, on an obstacle course, or on the Jersey Shore. Television producers are betting on a new location: the International Space Station.
    edition.cnn.com
  6. Batyrgaziev, Ragan make Olympic history for pro boxers Albert Batyrgaziev became the first professional boxer to win an Olympic gold medal Thursday when the 23-year-old Russian conquered the featherweight division by beating Duke Ragan, a fellow pro.
    foxnews.com
  7. A surprise winner in Trump's trade war with China: Roku Vendors are racing to stockpile Chinese-made "smart" TVs ahead of potential U.S. tariffs, boosting the streaming company
    cbsnews.com
  8. PA school official bashed for silencing woman speaking out against CRT A Pennsylvania school board president has come under fire and faces calls to step down after cutting off an Iranian woman who spoke out against critical race theory during a board meeting.
    nypost.com
  9. The Health 202: Government watchdog will investigate the controversial Alzheimer's drug The HHS inspector general will peer into how Aduhelm was approved.
    washingtonpost.com
  10. Jason Rantz: Seattle homeless encampment so dangerous Sheriff tells staff to work remotely for safety The homelessness crisis in the city of Seattle has become so dangerous that not even the King County Sheriff’s Department can keep its professional staff safe.
    foxnews.com
  11. The Greenland ice sheet experienced a massive melting event last week The melting event could have short-term and long-term implications for sea-level rise.
    washingtonpost.com
  12. Planets similar to those in our solar system found around nearby star An array of planets with similarities to some in our solar system, including an ocean world and a potentially habitable planet, have been found around a nearby star by astronomers using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile.
    edition.cnn.com
  13. One Month Ago Joe Biden Declared U.S. Close to Independence From COVID; Where Do We Stand? One month after President Biden said that the U.S. was close to "declaring independence" from COVID-19, nearly 10,000 people have died from the coronavirus.
    newsweek.com
  14. The Hidden Force Behind U.S.-Iran Policy? Racism | Opinion After decades of warmongering, aggression and outright inhumanity, it's time for a totally new approach. That means a complete end to blanket sanctions, a renewed commitment to diplomacy and a reversal of all military posturing.
    newsweek.com
  15. The best things to do in the D.C. area the week of Aug. 5-11 This week brings the beginning of D.C.'s Restaurant Week and the final chance to visit the National Museum of Women in the Arts before a two-year closure.
    washingtonpost.com
  16. Welcome to the Summer of Not Knowing What Summer It Is You wouldn’t remember this, but at the end of June I was honestly on a dance floor under a disco ball, shoulder to shoulder with sweaty strangers, most of whom were singing “Dancing Queen,” and we were all vaccinated against the coronavirus, so we were nervous enough to say “Do you think this is okay?” but not nervous enough to leave. It was hot vax summer! Just like we were promised! When that first big night out of the house resulted in a strep-throat diagnosis, I didn’t find it ominous at all. No, it was cute: two days of antibiotics and I was ready to get drunk on the Fourth of July.Just a few weeks later, New York City was counting more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases a day, and the primary topic of conversation in my social circle had turned to the season’s shifting vibes. The city’s energy was—some suggested—unsettling and weird. There were rumors of a “gay cold” circulating at Pride events, and then through a holiday cluster in Provincetown, Massachusetts. New York’s government started offering $100 bribes to get vaccinated, and its appeals took on a more desperate pitch. Over the span of a single week, Mayor Bill de Blasio went from touting the “summer of New York City” and rejecting the idea of any new mask mandates to acknowledging that the Delta variant has “changed the game.” (Meanwhile, his office is still planning to host a massive “homecoming” concert in Central Park on August 21.)[Read: Hot vax summer crumbled before my eyes]If the hot vax summer hasn’t yet been canceled, it’s certainly under threat. With seven weeks to go until the start of fall, we’ve been presented with an urgent and confusing question: What kind of summer is it now?Every year since the advent of social media, April and May have been times to discuss plans for one’s “summer aesthetic” and to create summer mood and vision boards in preparation. Then the summer gets a name and anthem: [YEAR] was the summer of X, when the song of the summer was Y. Hot vax summer is a play on “hot-girl summer,” the dominant meme of 2019, a year you might be able to recall if you’ve recently watched an old season of reality television.Summer 2021 seemed slippery, though, even before the Delta surge began. From the start it was weighed down with too much significance and too many narratives—too much rushing to live too many different ideas of normal life. The mood was, if not manic, careening. Lorde, whom most people hadn’t seen or heard from in four years, delivered a creepy beach bacchanal in early June; another song from the same album had the sleepiest anti-hot-vax-summer lyrics I can personally imagine: “My hot blood’s been burnin’ for so many summers now / It’s time to cool it down.” Meanwhile, brands set about their business. Old Navy ads from mid-July featured maskless families traveling wherever they wanted—including indoor public spaces!—and doing choreographed dances together, declaring a “hot fam summer,” which sounded disgusting but looked pretty fun. (“This commercial is driving me up a god damn wall,” a Reddit commenter wrote two weeks later. “It’s ALWAYS on … Why does Old Navy have people dancing around like we’re not in the end times for every commercial now?”) “Why are the vibes off in New York” because nothing is going well????? — George Civeris (@georgeciveris) July 23, 2021Brock Colyar, the New York magazine party reporter who has been documenting hot vax summer in New York City with a weekly column, told me that a Pride party at the Standard in the last week of June—at which Madonna performed—was the pinnacle of the summer we were supposed to have. (You can see just how packed it was in an Instagram video posted by the Bravo host Andy Cohen.) “It’s a particularly good party for looking at how the mood changed around Delta,” Colyar said. People were smoking together and swigging from the same bottles of alcohol in a very small, closed-door space. “That was definitely one of those events where in the days after, a ton of people were saying they weren’t feeling well.” Now party-going 20-somethings are talking about having a kind of “existential disappointment” at the return of masks and social distancing, Colyar said, but they’re still at it, and the hot-vax-summer magazine column will play out to the end.Everywhere you look, there’s another summer happening. Writing in the New Yorker, Kyle Chayka described a “main-character energy” among young people who want to “reclaim control” of their stories. One woman I follow on Twitter but do not actually know called this the summer of “refusing to investigate further”; another dubbed it “repenting girl summer bc I need so much grace & mercy.” I have no idea what any of these people are talking about. I’ve seen “armpit girl summer,” also unexplained. “Pinched by crabs summer.” Okay? Even the definition of hot-girl summer has become completely indecipherable: Lately, people have started insisting that this year’s hot girls are different from 2019’s hot girls in that they all have amnesia or irritable bowel syndrome and love tinned fish, which is “hot girl food.” Again: What!I, for one, have been enamored of the idea of “DFW summer,” referring not to the Dallas–Fort Worth area but to the writer David Foster Wallace. There was this TikTok of a guy in a bandanna, to which the first reply was “it’s David Foster Wallace Summer.” On Instagram, an account called @infintejestcellectuals—which started counting down to “DFW summer” in May—reposted a TikTok of a girl in a silky bandanna standing on the edge of a crowded pool, zooming in on half a dozen other girls in silky bandannas and regretting the fact that she looked “like every other bitch.” DFW summer seems to be about the bandannas, mostly. But I liked the concept of this tweet from early June: “It’s DFW summer. it’s new sincerity summer it’s post-cringe summer.”The precise meaning of the summer depends even more than usual, this year, on each person’s geography, risk tolerance, age, sense of their own importance. But one definition of the summer really lands. On July 23, the publicist Michael Lieberman tweeted a photo of Philip Seymour Hoffman grimacing on the back of a boat, drink in hand, American flag in the background—a screenshot from the 1999 murder movie The Talented Mr. Ripley—and captioned it “the summer of uncertain vibes.” (26,000 likes.) Of course! The summer of 2021 is the summer of not knowing what summer it is, or what label could possibly be appropriate. Some may still be trying to have a good time, but no one is entirely at ease.When I messaged Lieberman to ask about his caption, he responded, fittingly, with statements posed as questions: “I just think people expected a crazy summer and we all kind of approached it cautiously in the end? Not disappointment as much as ambivalence?”That sounds right?
    theatlantic.com
  17. This is a dangerous moment with Iran. The Biden administration knows it. While a return to engagement between Tehran and Washington seemed probable just a few weeks ago, now escalating tensions and even military conflict could be increasingly likely.
    washingtonpost.com
  18. Louis C.K. announces 2021 comeback tour years after sexual misconduct scandal, cancellation Louis C.K. is staging a comeback by way of a multi-city tour across the United States.
    foxnews.com
  19. Korda flirts with 59 to build 4-shot Olympic lead Nelly Korda reached her tee shot on the final hole of an otherwise flawless round, looked up and saw a thick pine branch blocking her path to the green. She flung her water bottle toward her golf bag and tried to figure out the next option.
    foxnews.com
  20. 135 children hospitalized for COVID in Florida as state sets new overall hospitalization record Florida just set a new record for COVID hospitalizations, with 135 of those being children, the highest ever. Governor DeSantis is now blaming immigration for the spread of COVID. CBS News correspondent Manuel Bojorquez spoke to locals and medical experts about what's truly driving the spike in cases.
    cbsnews.com
  21. Eye Opener: Evacuations underway as Dixie Fire spreads Urgent evacuations across North Central California as the state's largest wildfire engulfed a small town. Also, Florida sets a pandemic hospitalization record. All that and all that matters in today’s Eye Opener. Your world in 90 seconds.
    cbsnews.com
  22. Aussie skater uncorks 'stealthy' trick for gold in Tokyo As the coronavirus pandemic shut down competitions and clouded the future for the Tokyo Olympics, Australian skateboarder Keegan Palmer and his coach were hatching a cunning plan.
    foxnews.com
  23. Kourtney Kardashian goes topless to show off haircut by Travis Barker The Poosh founder used the recent chop to conceal her nipples.
    nypost.com
  24. Reality television is heading to outer space Two upcoming reality television shows plan to offer a once-in-a-lifetime grand prize: A trip to space. Mike Massimino, a former astronaut, talks to CNN Business about the feasibility of these shows taking off.
    edition.cnn.com
  25. Gregg Popovich ‘felt badly’ about knocking Patty Mills out of Olympics First, Gregg Popovich lost Patty Mills to the Nets, then his team eliminated him from the Summer Olympics. Neither made the Spurs’ coach very happy. The United States men’s basketball team’s coach didn’t want to lose, but he couldn’t help but feel for the 32-year-old Mills in what could be his Olympic finale after the...
    nypost.com
  26. American teen Harrison wins first Olympic women's canoe 200 Nevin Harrison saved her tears for the finish line, where they came pouring out over a golden smile.
    foxnews.com
  27. Exclusive: Intel agencies scour reams of genetic data from Wuhan lab in Covid origins hunt US intelligence agencies are digging through a treasure trove of genetic data that could be key to uncovering the origins of the coronavirus -- as soon as they can decipher it.
    edition.cnn.com
  28. Robinhood brings the meme stock phenomenon full circle Earlier this year, when GameStop shares exploded out of the blue, all eyes were on Robinhood, the commission-free trading app that was helping millions of amateur investors gain access to financial markets. Coordinating on social media, the app's users showed an uncanny ability to supercharge a wide array of stocks.
    edition.cnn.com
  29. Fauci: US 'may sooner or later get another variant' The more the virus spreads, the more it has "ample opportunity" to mutate, Fauci said.
    abcnews.go.com
  30. Scherzer Ks 10 in debut, Dodgers hit 4 HRs to beat Astros Max Scherzer has accomplished many things during his 14-year major league career, but it wasn't until his first start for the Los Angeles Dodgers on Wednesday night that he got to enjoy this particular experience:
    foxnews.com