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The economy is getting even worse for Americans with high school degrees or less education
Nearly a million people with a high school education or less lost work in November and December, reversing job recovery since April.
washingtonpost.com
Pension funds demand BlackRock disclose its political activity in the wake of U.S. Capitol riots
Public worker retirement funds controlling more than $1 trillion are pressuring BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager, to reveal more about its political activity — the start of a broader push to convince Wall Street to curtail support for some Republicans.
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washingtonpost.com
House opens investigation of pandemic ventilator purchases overseen by White House
A Washington Post investigation earlier this month found that the 11,200 ventilators made by a well-connected company were ill-suited for covid-19 patients and remain in a warehouse.
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washingtonpost.com
How ‘Flows Before Pros’ Is Disrupting Stock Markets
It seems inevitable that the populist forces that have disrupted almost everything else in recent years would eventually arrive to democratize investing. But the sheer impact of retail trading has been shocking, primarily to financial professionals who appear ill-equipped to deal with it. Organizing via social media, the amateurs have been able to send so-called “meme stocks” like GameStop Corp. soaring, while hedge funds that have been betting against the chosen companies are in pain. Some worr
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washingtonpost.com
Under Biden, Democrats are ready to revive net neutrality rules
The White House, Federal Communications Commission and Congress face early pressure to bring back open-Internet safeguards scrapped under former president Donald Trump.
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Once a rural village, D.C.’s Mount Pleasant now an ‘oasis in the city’
WHERE WE LIVE | The area at the edge of Rock Creek Park is known for its diversity and eclectic vibe.
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washingtonpost.com
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, muzzled under Trump, prepares to renew tough industry oversight
After taking a largely hands-off approach in the Trump era, the consumer watchdog hatched by Elizabeth Warren is expected to resume issuing tough penalties and rules.
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washingtonpost.com
Why Covid and Empty Containers Have Sailors Swearing
Sixty-five years ago, a North Carolina trucker named Malcom McLean pioneered the standardized shipping container, launching a global trading system that lifted millions of people out of poverty and created a generation of discount-minded American shoppers. Those boxes are now at the center of a worldwide transport puzzle as a shortage of containers in the right places has disrupted supply chains, idled car factories and sparked a surge in costs that’s pinching companies and consumers. Here’s a l
washingtonpost.com
Why Delaying the Second Covid Vaccine Shot Is Messy
As hospitalizations and deaths from Covid-19 rise, governments are grappling with whether to prioritize getting a first shot of vaccine into as many arms as possible, or to take a slower approach that reserves some of the limited supply to deliver a second dose at the optimal interval to attain maximum protection. Some governments seem willing to accept the trade-off of lower immunity to inoculate more people. Some scientists have cautioned that untested timing regimens have the potential to und
washingtonpost.com
Twitter bans MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell
The fierce Trump ally has repeatedly violated policies barring the spread of election misinformation, the social media giant says.
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Meet the people paying $55 million each to fly to the space station
The first space crew composed entirely of private citizens includes two grandfathers and a father with three young children. All are extremely wealthy.
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washingtonpost.com
Giuliani wasn’t just a Trump partisan but a shrewd marketer of vitamins, gold, lawsuit says
Trump’s personal lawyer sought to turn unfounded conspiracy theories and voter fraud videos into online moneymakers, attorneys said in a lawsuit seeking more than $1.3 billion in damages.
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washingtonpost.com
Five things to know about the latest efforts to bring unions to Big Tech
New efforts to unionize tech employees are cropping up. Here’s what you need to know.
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washingtonpost.com
Now is the perfect time to rethink your wardrobe, with an eye toward sustainability
Buying secondhand or from companies that are promoting clothing recycling and other environmentally friendly policies can help reduce your carbon footprint.
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washingtonpost.com
YouTube suspends Rudy Giuliani from its ad revenue sharing program
The video streaming service said Giuliani repeatedly violated rules against posting false information about the recent election.
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washingtonpost.com
Many people may not get promised stimulus payments in hand if they owe back taxes
Backlogs and timing could prevent some Americans who owe Uncle Sam back taxes from receiving stimulus payments when they file their 2020 return to claim the Recovery Rebate Credit.
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washingtonpost.com
‘When covid is over’ sounds like ‘when I meet Harry Styles’: The new pandemic meme, explained
It’s become a trend to compare the phrase “when covid is over” to other seemingly unreachable milestones.
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washingtonpost.com
What to Know About Trump’s Second Impeachment Trial
The same Senate chamber that was overrun by insurrectionists will be the somber court for Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, as senators weigh whether to make him the first president permanently disqualified from future office. A year ago, following a trial largely drama-free because its end result was never much in doubt, the Senate acquitted Trump of two articles of impeachment. Much is different this time. Trump is an ex-president, the first to face impeachment proceedings after leaving office
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washingtonpost.com
How Biden Wants to Trim a Mountain of Student Debt
Among the economic issues facing the new Biden administration is how to help alleviate the weight of $1.7 trillion in student debt, a figure that had ballooned from $1 trillion in 2012. All but about $100 billion of that money is owed to the federal government by some 43 million people. President Joe Biden has said he supports a plan for Congress to cancel as much as $10,000 in debt for federal student borrowers, in part as a response to the pandemic. It’s a proposal that’s been welcomed by some
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washingtonpost.com