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Συνελήφθησαν το απόγευμα της Τρίτης σε περιοχή του Δήμου Χερσονήσου, από αστυνομικούς του τμήματος Δίωξης Ναρκωτικών της Υποδιεύθυνσης Ασφαλείας Ηρακλείου...
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Shia LaBeouf banned FKA Twigs from making eye contact with men, she says
"I just was living a very regimented and contained life that I felt got me in the least trouble."
nypost.com
Senate to receive article of impeachment, triggering Trump trial
House managers are presenting the article of impeachment against former President Trump to the Senate, triggering a trial into whether the former commander in chief incited a riot at the Capitol. Kris Van Cleave reports.
cbsnews.com
Brian Geraghty makes return to ‘Big Sky’ as creepy Ronald
Brian Geraghty is enjoying his role as creepy psycho man child Ronald Pergman on "Big Sky" -- but says that playing the role has its awkward moments.
nypost.com
Leonard Fournette’s abrupt redemption story reaches Super Bowl 2021
Players have all sorts of reactions after they reach the Super Bowl for the first time in their lives. Some exult. Others reflect. Leonard Fournette wept. “I was crying for like 30 minutes,’’ Fournette said after the Buccaneers outlasted the Packers 31-26 in the NFC Championship game. ‘’I was on the phone with my mom...
nypost.com
Race to roll out vaccine intensifies as new COVID strains emerge
There's confusion about how much coronavirus vaccine is available as states struggle to keep up with demand. Adding to the urgency is a rise in new variants. Jonathan Vigliotti has the latest.
cbsnews.com
Gorilla Gets Monoclonal Antibody Therapy For COVID-19
An older silverback gorilla in San Diego, Calif., received an array of treatments after it and others in the troop contracted the coronavirus. The therapy came from a supply meant for non-humans.
npr.org
California officials reveal more details of homegrown coronavirus mutation
California officials on Monday revealed more details about the new homegrown coronavirus strain that could be partly responsible for a sharp uptick of cases and deaths in the state. Two research groups discovered the B1429 variant while looking for the highly-contagious B117 variant that has been linked to the United Kingdom, officials said at a...
nypost.com
GameStop 300% stock rise is at center of Wall Street battle royal
Investors in popular Reddit group push retailer's stock and are accused of threatening those betting against it.
cbsnews.com
Twitter launches crowd-sourced fact-checking project with 'helpfulness score'
Twitter said it wants both experts and non-experts to write Birdwatch notes. It cited Wikipedia as a site that thrives with non-expert contributions.       
usatoday.com
Arizona Republicans embrace Trump despite election losses
Former President Donald Trump may be out of the White House but his influence on the Republican Party continues to loom large. Dylan Smith, the editor and publisher of TusconSentinel.com, joins CBSN's "Red & Blue" host Elaine Quijano to discuss why the Arizona GOP is censuring some of the state's most prominent political figures.
cbsnews.com
The hard-to-believe saga of Pam Anderson and Tommy Lee’s X-rated marriage
The volatile relationship between “Baywatch” babe Pamela Anderson and Mötley Crüe rocker Tommy Lee is the subject of an upcoming Hulu show “Pam & Tommy.”
nypost.com
These entertainment industry workers are offering to help Biden with the Covid-19 vaccine rollout
Out-of-work backstage crews in the entertainment industry are volunteering to help in the fight against Covid-19.
edition.cnn.com
What is the TikTok Tailgate? Everything you need to know
The NFL recently announced it will be teaming up with the social media giant TikTok to deliver the TikTok Tailgate — a unique pregame experience for “7,500 vaccinated health care heroes” prior to the 2021 Super Bowl.
foxnews.com
Gutfeld on the media going easy on President Biden
foxnews.com
Keira Knightley talks 'male gaze,' why she won't film nude scenes with male directors
Keira Knightley says she isn't interested in shooting scenes with nudity, unless they're made by a female filmmaker. Here's why.        
usatoday.com
California lifts stay home rule as virus rates ease
California has lifted regional stay-at-home orders statewide in response to improving coronavirus conditions. The change allows restaurants and churches to resume outdoor operations and hair and nail salons to reopen in many areas. (Jan. 25)       
usatoday.com
Biden: I don’t blame teachers or their unions for schools staying closed
At the White House, the president told reporters that reopening schools is “complicated.”
washingtonpost.com
House Dems revive 'For The People Act' aimed at 'voter suppression,' 'dark money,' and gerrymandering
House Democrats are engaged in a new push to pass comprehensive legislation this month they say is aimed at strengthening voting rights and fighting voter suppression and gerrymandering
foxnews.com
Why the Supreme Court didn't want to hear the Trump emoluments cases and what it means going forward
Early in the Trump administration, a novel dispute arose concerning whether the President had violated the Constitution by illegally profiting from his business ventures while in public office.
edition.cnn.com
Janet Yellen confirmed by Senate as Biden’s Treasury Secretary
WASHINGTON — Former Federal Reserve chair Janet Yellen has been confirmed as President Biden’s Treasury Secretary, becoming the first woman to hold the role. Yellen was confirmed by the Senate on Monday evening in a bipartisan vote, 84-15, and became the third secretary in Biden’s cabinet to pass the confirmation process. The Brooklyn-born economist is...
nypost.com
Wholesome TikTok of Young Men Helping Older Woman Use Skateboard Goes Viral
People quickly showed love for a clip of two skaters gently guiding an older woman down the street.
newsweek.com
SUNY college applications plummet 20 percent amid COVID-19
The number of students applying to attend one of the State University of New York’s 64 campuses plummeted by 20 percent this year amid the coronavirus pandemic, Chancellor James Malatras said. Malatras dropped the bombshell in an op-ed published on Empire Report New York. “This year at the largest system of public higher education in...
nypost.com
California officials say unemployment fraud now totals more than $11 billion
In addition to the confirmed fraud, the state has stopped tens of billions of dollars in payments on bogus claims through tougher security measures, officials said.
latimes.com
Biden thinks US can get to 1.5 million vaccine doses daily
President Joe Biden says that he expects that the US will soon be able to vaccinate 1.5 million people a day, raising the bar by roughly 500,000 more vaccinations than his previous target of 1 million per day.
edition.cnn.com
Yellen confirmed as Treasury chief with more economic aid at top of agenda
She will be working with Congress on a Covid relief package.
politico.com
Igor Shesterkin ‘dejected’ as Rangers pressure mounts
During training camp this month, Igor Shesterkin said he wouldn’t consider himself the No. 1 goalie on the Rangers. But the rookie netminder expressed his insatiable desire to earn that title. Fast-forward to the morning after his third start of the season, a 3-2 loss to the Penguins that dropped his record to 0-2-1, and,...
nypost.com
Apollo’s Leon Black to step down after probe into Jeffrey Epstein ties
Leon Black is stepping down as CEO of Apollo Global Management following an internal probe into his ties to convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, the company said Monday. The monthslong probe, conducted by law firm Dechert, found no evidence that Black engaged in any of Epstein’s alleged criminal activities but determined that he paid Epstein $148...
nypost.com
Subway video honors transit COVID-19 worker deaths
New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority is honoring its 136 employees who have died of COVID-19 since the pandemic began with a digital memorial at 107 subway stations. (Jan. 25)       
usatoday.com
What Rob Portman's retirement *really* tells us
Nothing in American politics happens in a vacuum.
edition.cnn.com
Former San Diego mayor launches exploratory committee to challenge Gov. Newsom: 'Ready for new leadership'
Former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer said on Monday that he is seriously considering challenging California Gov. Gavin Newsom in the next election, amid mounting support for a recall campaign seeking to oust the Democratic governor.
foxnews.com
These Are the 30 Most Popular Small Dog Breeds
Dogs might be "man's best friend" but sometimes man does not have a lot of space. These are the 30 most popular dogs to fit in even the tightest of living quarters.
newsweek.com
How a bunch of Redditors made GameStop’s stock soar
A pedestrian wearing a protective mask walks past a GameStop store in the Herald Square area of New York City on Friday, November 27, 2020. | Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images How a bunch of Redditors made GameStop’s stock soar, much to the chagrin of the hedge funds attempting to short it. Who knew the first big 2021 stock market story would be … GameStop? But here we are. There’s been a boom in day trading and individual investing over the past several months — activity that’s often taking place or being discussed on platforms such as Reddit and Robinhood instead of in more traditional arenas. And one big question amid the frenzy has been how much the little guys really matter. Sure, small-time investors trade a lot, sometimes to the annoyance of more traditional institutions, but are they really consequential? When it comes to the GameStop saga, at least, the answer is yes. An army of traders on the Reddit forum r/WallStreetBets helped drive a meteoric rise in GameStop’s stock price in recent days, forcing it to halt trading multiple times and causing a major headache for the short sellers betting against it and banking on the stock falling. Famed investor and CNBC personality Jim Cramer called the GameStop drama the “squeeze of a lifetime.” Bloomberg opinion columnist Matt Levine posited that one possible explanation for what happened could be “utter nihilism” on the part of the Reddit crowd, a story “perhaps best told with a series of rocket emojis.” Or maybe one of the WallStreetBets moderators put it best to Wired: “It was a meme stock that really blew up.” There’s been a lot of hand-wringing about the day-trading trend and this new crop of investors playing the markets, many of whom are treating stocks more like a spin at the roulette wheel than a long-term strategy to build wealth. It’s not clear how many of them are looking at the underlying fundamentals of companies, or whether they’re just “YOLO-ing” themselves across the market. On GameStop, the answer is probably a mix. There’s a reasonable business case to make for the game retailer’s valuation; there’s also a case that this whole thing has just been quite fun for everyone — the possible-trolls of Reddit, market watchers, commentators, and certainly GameStop — except for the short sellers, who have been in for a pretty miserable ride. “It’s dramatic, and you don’t see this magnitude very often,” said Nick Colas, the co-founder of DataTrek Research. “But when it happens, it’s spectacular.” This doesn’t mean GameStop’s stock price will stay up forever, or that the company is suddenly in a perfect spot. But if it were to, say, offer more stock, it would probably have some buyers. An attempt at an explanation of what is going on here, for people who don’t follow markets at all So let’s back up a bit to go over some of the very basics of what is even going on here, because it’s kind of a lot. GameStop is a video game retailer headquartered in Grapevine, Texas, that operates more than 5,000 stores. Between malls dying out and the pandemic, if you forgot the company existed, that would be fair. But it’s still out there, trucking along. GameStop has become a popular play among short sellers, who are basically investors who think a stock will go down. In Wall Street terminology, these investors are bearish on a stock’s prospects. Again, dying malls plus pandemic. You get the reasoning. Though the buying frenzy around GameStop hit this month, this one has been in the making for a while. Brandon Kochkodin at Bloomberg recently laid out how GameStop, which isn’t expected to even turn a profit until 2023, has seen its market skyrocket, and what Reddit has to do with it. By Kochkodin’s recounting, a bull case for GameStop (basically, an argument that it’s stock is good) started showing up on WallStreetBets about two years ago and has, off and on, been bubbling up. Scion Asset Management, the hedge fund run by Michael Burry, who you might know from The Big Short, revealed he had a position in the company, which inspired some confidence, and then Ryan Cohen, the co-founder of the pet e-commerce company Chewy, disclosed last August that he had a big stake in GameStop. Earlier this month, he was added to its board. That’s been interpreted as positive for GameStop. As Reddit and retail traders started to take notice of GameStop, they also took notice of how heavily shorted the stock was — information that’s generally pretty easy to get. And they figured out a way that, if they acted all together, they could sort of screw the shorts over and make a profit doing it. Kochkodin points to a post from four months ago starting to plot. Its subject: “Bankrupting Institutional Investors for Dummies, ft Gamestop.” How a short squeeze is making Reddit happy and short sellers sad GameStop’s stock price has skyrocketed by 400 percent from where it was at the start of the year at under $20 to more than $76 at market close on Monday. It’s been super volatile, even spiking above $150, thanks in no small part to Reddit and the short sellers its after. WallStreetBets has an antagonistic relationship with shorts — many retail traders are betting stocks will go up, not down. Lots of hedge funds and investors are shorting GameStop, but at the center of the current saga is Citron Research, which is run by famed short seller Andrew Left. Last week, Citron announced on Twitter that it would be hosting a livestream event laying out the short case against GameStop and arguing people buying the stock were “suckers at this poker game.” They predicted shares would go back to $20. The event was put off, first because of the presidential inauguration, then because of attempts to hack Citron’s Twitter. Eventually, they got the video out, and the battle has continued. Left has said he’ll no longer comment on GameStop because of the “angry mob” that’s formed against him and complained he’d “never seen such an exchange of ideas of people so angry about someone joining the other side of the trade.” Retail traders have been able to orchestrate what’s known as a short squeeze against Citron and the others betting against GameStop, which screws up the short trade and drives the stock price up. (Don’t worry, we’ll explain what that is.) When a hedge fund or investor shorts a stock, they basically speculate that its price will go down. They do that by borrowing, usually from a broker-dealer, shares of a stock that they think will lose value by a set date and then selling them at the market price. “It’s a much more sophisticated investor kind of play,” Colas said. “[The bet] has to work pretty quickly, because what you don’t want is your short stock at $10 and it goes up to $100, because you can lose more than 100 percent of the capital that you put down.” When you short a stock, you have to at some point buy back the shares you borrowed and return them. If the trade works, you buy them at a lower price and get to keep the difference. But if the price of the stock goes up, it doesn’t work. At some point, you’ve got to buy the stock back and return it, even when the price is higher and you’re going to lose money. What happens with a short squeeze is that when the price of the stock being shorted starts to climb, it forces traders who are betting it will fall to buy it to try to stem losses. That winds up driving up the price of the stock even higher, so it’s a bit of a double whammy for shorts. The worst-case scenario is, theoretically, unlimited. “The short squeeze is when somebody says, ‘Oh, I know a lot of guys are short. I’m going to go long and make them buy the stock back even higher,’” Colas said. To add on another layer to this, a lot of the activity around GameStop hasn’t been people directly buying the stock but also buying call options, where they basically gamble that it will go up. It’s complicated, but the takeaway is that call option buys may have also driven up the stock because the market maker selling those options hedges by buying more stock. And there was a lot of options buying, namely among day traders — volumes have skyrocketed, and one WallStreetBets trader claimed to have turned $50,000 into $11 million playing options. Levine summed up what amounts to a snowball effect here: Something started the ball rolling—the stock went up for some fundamental or emotional or whatever reason—and then the stock going up forced short sellers and options market makers to buy stock, which caused it to go up more, which caused them to buy more, etc. The shorts are definitely hurting: Melvin Capital Management, a hedge fund betting against GameStop, is down 15 percent in just the first three weeks of 2021, according to the Wall Street Journal. It’s had to call in some help. “They’re smarter than we think” The GameStop episode is a mix of serious and silly — part retail traders demonstrating some actual power in the market, part accepting that some of this just makes no sense. Whether GameStop took off because it’s a meme stock — a stock about which interest is as much cultural or social as it is financial — or because there is something to the business case is unclear. There is a business case, there is a cultural interest; the balance between the two in driving the price is indeterminate. Part of it might basically be a joke. What is clear is that a lot of what’s happening with the stock now isn’t because of a potential turnaround; it’s because the trade went viral. “It doesn’t make business sense,” Doug Clinton, co-founder of Loup Ventures, told Bloomberg. “It makes sense from an investor psychology standpoint. I think there’s a tendency where there is heavy retail interest for those types of traders to think about stocks differently than institutional investors in terms of what they’re willing to pay.” Day traders are hardly a monolith, including the ones at WallStreetBets, which boasts 2.2 million members, or as they refer to themselves, “degenerates.” But just because this is a bit of an odd (and somewhat unexplainable) episode doesn’t mean it doesn’t signal some bigger things that are important. For one thing, it seems like the WallStreetBets crowd has learned a tactic that it can replicate in orchestrating short squeezes. “What they’ve done is target large short positions,” Cramer said on CNBC on Monday. “They’re smarter than we think. They’re after the ones that are too shorted.” Some observers have raised questions about whether what’s happened with WallStreetBets and GameStop might draw regulatory scrutiny and whether this might count as market manipulation. Colas said he’s doubtful there’s much of a case for that here. “Everything is known. There’s no insider information here,” he said. If a hedge fund shorting a stock can put out a presentation and video about why a company is bad, why can’t random people talking to each other on the internet talk about why a company is good? To be sure, on the legal front, reasonable minds might disagree. One of WallStreetBets’s moderators addressed the impression that the community is “disorderly and reckless” in a post on Sunday while at the same time pushing back against any suggestions there’s an organized effort among moderators to promote or recommend any stock. “What I think is happening is that you guys are making such an impact that these fat cats are worried that they have to get up and put in work to earn a living,” the moderator wrote. “Some of these guys [who] traditionally used the media as a tool for them to manipulate the market have failed to further line their pockets and now want to accuse you guys as being manipulators.” GameStop has been the perfect storm for the current retail trend. It’s a recognizable name, there’s some business case for it, and it’s turned into a meme. And it’s heavily shorted, which is bound to irk the recent crop of retail traders who subscribe to the mantra that “stocks only go up.” This isn’t the first time day trading has become trendy, nor is it the first time day traders have been accused — often rightly — of being a little bit reckless. Last summer, a bunch of them piled into bankrupt Hertz, for which there was really no good case. Many of them treat trading like a game, which can obviously be dangerous. But it’s hard to root against them. Plenty of hedge funds, short sellers, billionaires, and institutional investors treat investing like a game, too. And every once in a while, they’re bound to lose, too, even to the little guys.
vox.com
Arians' hiring put struggling Bucs on path to Super Bowl 55
It took five coaching changes over a decade-plus of futility before the Tampa Bay Buccaneers finally got it right, luring Bruce Arians out of retirement. Two seasons later, the 68-year-old quarterback expert has them in the Super Bowl.
foxnews.com
Residents ask high court to block removal of Richmond’s Robert E. Lee statue as Virginia prepares to act
Metal fencing goes up around traffic circle where protesters have been a constant presence since summer.
washingtonpost.com
Tom Brady's parents both tested positive for COVID-19 last year: 'It was a matter of life and death'
Tom Brady was “stressed out” at one point last year when both his father and mother tested positive for COVID-19 just before the future Hall of Fame quarterback was set to begin his first season with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.
foxnews.com
Janet Yellen Confirmed By Senate, Making History As First Female Treasury Secretary
Janet Yellen was confirmed by the Senate to serve as Treasury Secretary. She'll be the first woman to hold that post and will lead the Biden Administration's efforts to address the pandemic recession.
npr.org
Southern Hills to replace Trump National for '22 PGA
The PGA Championship is headed back to Southern Hills next year, the Oklahoma course that gets its eighth major championship earlier than expected after the PGA of America cut ties with former President Donald Trump.
foxnews.com
Two murderers in state prison and other inmates scammed state jobless benefits, DA says
New charges were announced Monday against six inmates and four others involved in scamming California unemployment benefits.
latimes.com
Uganda Security Forces Ordered To Stop Detention Of Losing Presidential Candidate
A judge ruled Monday that security forces surrounding the home of Bobi Wine, who lost a disputed election to President Yoweri Museveni, must leave. It's not clear if the ruling will be obeyed.
npr.org
Rep. Crenshaw on Biden lifting transgender military ban: 'People should serve openly'
Any American willing and able to serve in the military should be permitted to do so, Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, said Monday after President Biden lifted a Trump-era restriction on transgender people serving their country.
foxnews.com
Biden takes questions from mostly pre-selected reporters at first formal press conference as POTUS
President Biden held his first formal White House press conference on Monday, but most of the questions asked were from reporters that were pre-selected by his team. 
foxnews.com
U.S. Records Worst Poverty Spike Since 1960s, Black Americans Hit Hardest
8 million more Americans, including 2.4 million Black Americans, were living in poverty at the end of 2020 compared to one year before.
newsweek.com
Joe Biden Increases COVID Vaccine Goal for First 100 Days After GOP Criticism
President Joe Biden has upped his goal for COVID-19 vaccinations in the United States—from 100 million in his first 100 days in office to about 150 million. This comes after some argued that his 100 million-doses goal was already on track to be met by the Trump administration.
newsweek.com
Oklahoma lawmaker proposes a bill that calls for creation of a Bigfoot hunting season
Bigfoot may be a considered a myth -- but that's not stopping one Oklahoma lawmaker from proposing open season on the creature.
edition.cnn.com
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell Sues the Daily Mail Over Jane Krakowski Affair Story
GettyMyPillow CEO and MAGA diehard Mike Lindell is suing the Daily Mail over its recent viral article claiming he had a months-long romantic relationship with actress Jane Krakowski.The staunch Trump ally’s legal effort, led by celebrity attorney and infamous “Gawker killer” Charles Harder, filed a lawsuit on Monday in the Southern District of New York reiterating the pillow mogul’s claims that prior to the Mail’s article he’d never even heard of Krakowski, a Tony-winning and Emmy-nominated actress most famous for her role as Jenna Maroney on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock, and her role on Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.In particular, the lawsuit asserted that the report caused Lindell “significant humiliation and emotional distress,” and undermined his credibility as an advocate for sobriety. While the article reported that Lindell has wooed Krakowski with champagne and liquor, Monday’s lawsuit noted that Lindell has spoken publicly about his struggles with substance abuse, and runs a recovery network for addicts.Read more at The Daily Beast.
thedailybeast.com
After Biden Campaigned on 'Master Plan' to Fight COVID, McConnell Targets His Vaccine Pace
Senator Mitch McConnell has criticized President Joe Biden for being "apparently content to maintain the same vaccine pace they inherited."
newsweek.com
Former Republican: We've got a bankrupt party
CNN's Kyung Lah takes a look at how President Donald Trump changed the Republican Party in Arizona.
edition.cnn.com
CNN 10 - January 26, 2021
January 26, 2021
edition.cnn.com