Air Canada indefinitely suspends 14 routes in Atlantic Canada, closes 2 stations

The region hit the hardest by the changes to the nation's largest airline is Atlantic Canada.
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Lethbridge councillors ask for delay in conversion therapy ban, want public hearing
Coun. Hyggen says he has been receiving many inquiries over the last few months about having a public hearing on the matter. 
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Deadline for second Torstar bid is now Monday
The decision buys extra time for Proud brothers and Neil Selfe to make their offer official. They will be competing with a $52 million offer made earlier by entrepreneurs Jordan Bitove and Paul Rivett.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Trump issues order commuting Roger Stone’s sentence in Russia probe
The move, though short of a full pardon, is sure to alarm critics who have long railed against the president's repeated interventions in the nation's justice system.
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More than a quarter of Toronto’s coronavirus deaths in the community have occurred in the city’s poorer northwest corner
Data released by Toronto Public Health reveal of 221 COVID-19 deaths in Toronto, 58, or 26 per cent, were people who lived in hard-hit northwest neighbourhoods. But the area is home to just 12 per cent of the city’s population.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Q and A with medical director of Edmonton’s Misericordia Hospital about COVID-19 outbreak
On Friday, Global News spoke with Dr. Robert Black, the hospital’s medical director.
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Premier John Horgan expects U.S. border shutdown to continue through at least August
B.C. Premier John Horgan says he expects Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the U.S. government to announce soon the border between countries will remain closed to non-essential travel. In a ride ranging Facebook Live interview on the Global BC page, Horgan said there are still substantial concerns from his government over the impact a bordering...
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This app helps you create pro-quality videos to celebrate from afar
Video tributes are a great way to celebrate special moments, at a time when people can't gather together. This app makes it easy.
Toronto Sun
Interior Health issues coronavirus advisory for downtown Kelowna, B.C.
Interior Health has issued an advisory that people who visited downtown Kelowna from June 25 to July 6 may have potentially been exposed to coronavirus.
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Alma's 650 Rio Tinto workers approve new contract
Union workers at the Rio Tinto plante in Alma have approved a new four-year collective agreement, six months before their existing one was set to expire.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Boat owners unhappy with city’s $25M transformation plans for Lachine marina
Montreal city plans to spend upwards of $25 million to turn the Lachine marina into a waterfront park that will be open to the public as of next year.
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Two men face second-degree murder charges in May killing of Fredericton man
Police were called early on May 2 to the Dr. Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital, where 29-year old Justin Leigh Finnemore died after being admitted with a gunshot wound.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Man charged after 1,902 fentanyl pills seized at London’s airport: police
The seizure, which occurred March 1, is being described by police as their largest single seizure of fentanyl pills to date.
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Businesses implementing mask policies in Durham Region
Businesses are implementing mask policies amid a mandatory bylaw now in effect for Durham indoor public spaces.
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NHL/NHLPA announce Toronto, Edmonton as hubs, and CBA extension
The NHL board of governors and NHL Players' Association have ratified the return-to-play plan and a four-year extension to the collective bargaining agreement, paving the way for the league to resume its pandemic-hit season later this summer in Canada.
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Saskatchewan’s plan to rebound from coronavirus shutdown relies on its Crown corporations
Saskatchewan's Crown corporations are still financially healthy and expected to play a large role in kick-starting the provincial economy coming out of the coronavirus pandemic.
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Coronavirus and use of wet wipes blocking sewers, leading to challenges at treatment plants
In London, flushed material can cause damage to equipment, takes up labour and can lead to blockages throughout the entire sewer system.
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The NHL is back: Players, owners ratify return-to-play plan and CBA extension
All players will be allowed to report to their team’s training camps on Monday, with teams heading to Toronto and Edmonton July 26.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
TikTok stars race to land reality shows
The boundaries between the online influencer world and reality TV are porous. Reality stars often amass large audiences on social media and pivot to full-time influencer-dom. And casting directors are known to pluck potential characters from the internet and put them on the big screen.
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Self-Care Items That Brought Us Joy And Got Us Through This Week
In the however many months since the start of our stay-home orders (reader: it’s been five, in case you’ve lost track), we’ve all been scrambling to find ways to keep our moods intact. The fact alone of a global pandemic is enough to make any grown person cry, and so it’s as important now as it always is to take care of ourselves, and to pay attention to what our bodies are telling us.Here at HuffPost Canada, our team of editors have been sharing some of the things we’ve been doing to bring a little joy to our lives. It’s much easier now to take a moment to look at the arrangements of our lives and notice all those little things we often take for granted. The dog walks in the sun. The great television show we can’t stop thinking about. The favourite meals, cooked for comfort. The finer things, which don’t always have to be fancy to make us happy. Now is the perfect time to celebrate the small, private joys we love to indulge in — and it’s an even better time to share those things with you!All product choices are made independently by our editors. HuffPost Canada may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Le Creuset tableware in sage For most of my adult life, I've added to my tableware piecemeal, mostly from estate sales, thrift stores, boxes on the sidewalk, and friends' cast offs. I decided, during the pandemic, that my stay-home treat would be to have good dishes that actually matched. I waited until Le Creuset Canada did a sweet two-for-one deal on tableware, and then opted for sage plates and bowls from the classic collection. I also bought a French oven on sale, in flame, because I've wanted one for two decades. And then mugs. And then a balti pot. After that my kid wrote a mock e-mail to Le Creuset saying, "If my mom orders anything else, just ignore her... this obsession has to stop." So now I have to check their Specials page at night when everyone else is in bed. Here's the link, so you can too.— Valerie Howes, Parents editor Le CreusetScandal eau de parfum, Jean Paul Gaultier I got a free sample of this from the Shopper's Drug Mart, one of my few regular outings during the early part of the pandemic, which were so welcome but always tinged with low-level anxiety. I miss stress-free shopping, y'all. But, I spritzed this on my wrists and it made me feel like I was in a big, shiny department store, maybe Nordstrom's, or, if you want to really escape, the Rinascente near the Duomo in Milan. I imagine myself browsing in the cosmetics section when a well-dressed woman in neutral tones whisks by me to the exit. I catch a waft of her fragrance as the warm air rushes into the air-conditioned store, and it's Scandal. And for a second, I don't worry about whether she's two-metres away. — Lisa Yeung, managing editor, LIFE. Jean Paul GaultierLighting candles in the morning and at night For my 23rd birthday, which just recently passed, a friend from New York sent a box of scented candles from Brooklyn Candle Studio. There are four of them: jasmin, “Italia,” palo santo, and one called “Woman No. 3,” which smells like sage, pine, spruce, and heaven, and which made me wonder what happened to the other two women. I’m not a terribly scent-sensitive person, but lighting candles in the mornings — while reading old Fran Lebowitz columns and drinking a cup of coffee — or just when I’m unwinding and preparing to go to bed — and watching, say, Sex and the City — has been a perfect way to relax: it’s like romance, but for one. — Connor Garel, associate editor, LIFE. Brooklyn Candle Studio InstagramWatching random episodes of "Sex and the City" Lately, I find I can’t focus. Blame the pandemic. My attention span is flying dangerously close to ground zero, and there's little to be done about it. What I’ve found comfort in — what I turn to when I can’t seem to concentrate on anything — is watching random episodes of Sex and the City, on Crave. It doesn’t matter which episode. Any will do. There’s something soothing about revisiting familiar things. Like old sweaters, or childhood blankets. Nostalgia, or whatever. Watching Sex and the City works because I have a near-encyclopedic knowledge of it, and because I can still get lost in the busyness of the characters’ exciting lives in New York as my own stands still in the suburbs. It's entertaining even when it's playing in the background. Low commitment, high reward. Plus, it’s easy to get swept up in the zest of the romantic entanglements, the inevitable bad decisions, the constant hysteria, and the loving candour between friends that makes it all OK in the end. In short: it makes me miss life! — Connor Garel, associate editor, LIFE HBOWorm on a string Meme mutation is one of my favourite internet niche topics, especially brain-related catchphrases right now. With pandemic mental fog rolling in thick sometimes, I relate to owning “one brain cell,” “no thoughts head empty,” or having “worms for brains.” During one of these foggy weeks, a wonderful friend pulled out all the stops to make a pandemic care package as stupidly lovable as possible. Among the stickers and candy was an infamous worm on a string. I had worms for brains. It was a worm with no brain. One look in its googly eyes was all it took. This blue pipe cleaner pet now has a forever home on my desk (when my roommate’s cat isn’t toying with it) and is a reminder that good friends (and silly gifts) can make even the foggiest times a little better. — Al Donato, associate editor, LIFE. AmazonAll of "I May Destroy You" Joining the chorus of people who recommend “I May Destroy You” — which is good company BTW, considering Maija's excellent piece on why everyone is obsessed with Michaela Coel's HBO show and early endorsements by Maija and LIFE's resident taste-maker, Connor. I love being emotionally destroyed every episode and you will too. Major content warnings for survivors. — Al Donato, associate editor, LIFE. HBO, via Bell MediaThe mime scene from "The Real Housewives of Potomac" Yes, a lot of people are going to see a "Real Housewives" title and dismiss it as trash. That's their loss, because the housewives boast some of the most truthful, funniest, and delightfully over-the-top women on television. Potomac (an affluent Maryland area near D.C., if you were wondering) is a criminally underrated franchise, and I'm genuinely baffled more people don't watch it. Just peep the scene (and then its followup) where one of the women sends a mime to invite her friends and frenemies alike on a trip to France, and he creeps in on a tense conversation between two strong-willed matriarchs, who assume (fairly!) that he's just a random weirdo. I guarantee it's one of stupidest and most joyful things you'll see this week.— Maija Kappler, associate Life editor Bravo TVRELATED Why Everyone Is Obsessed With 'I May Destroy You' 10 Movies About Racism And Black Identity That You Can Stream In Canada How To Pack A Zero-Waste Picnic
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Workers at seven Chartwell seniors residences go on strike
The strike, which affects seven residences in Quebec City and Saguenay, came after the two sides were deadlocked in conciliation sessions.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
NHL, players’ association announce Toronto and Edmonton as hub cities amid coronavirus
The NHL and NHLPA also ratified their return-to-play plan and a four-year extension to the collective bargaining agreement, paving a way for season play amid the pandemic
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Several police officers responding to ‘situation’ in Saint John
Several police cruisers are at the scene, including the force’s armoured rescue vehicle.
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911 Operator Falsely Accuses Black Cyclist Of 'Intimidating' White Woman
OTTAWA — A Black man from Ottawa says he wants to hear the full recording of a 911 call made about him by a white woman, after police apologized for their role in the incident.Ntwali Bashizi, 21, says he was taking a break from cycling on a trail bridge in a city park on Monday when the woman approached him and asked him to get off so she could pass from a distance.He says he told the woman she could pass with no problem because the bridge was about as wide as the rest of the trail, but told her she could wait until he was done resting if she wanted to.Bashizi says he started recording the interaction after the woman started taking photos of him and called someone on her phone.This Karen & her buckled knees decided to call the cops on my lil bro for crossing a BRIDGE because it’s not 6 feet in width. She was the assisted by @OttawaPolice who you hear telling him that he’s intimidating her, when they weren’t even there. @JimWatsonOttawa , train them plz pic.twitter.com/DaJ3hRbPnT— Joakim (@IceFresh2) July 6, 2020A video of the incident posted on Twitter this week shows the woman walking past Bashizi on the bridge while describing him on the phone to a 911 operator.In the video, posted by Bashizi’s older brother, the woman turns the call to speakerphone so the operator can talk to Bashizi.“Sir, it’s the Ottawa police. Do I really need to send a police officer just for you let this girl by?” the operator asks in the video.“I’m not stopping her from coming by,” Bashizi replies before being interrupted.“You’re intimidating her, sir, okay, can you just stand to the side?” the operator says, as Bashizi replies that he’s already doing so.Bashizi remains at a distance from the woman throughout the video and she eventually walks away while still on the phone.The police force replied to the Twitter video on Thursday, saying they have spoken with the man who posted it to offer a “full and unreserved apology.”“We are fully reviewing this incident,” the police force wrote on Twitter. “At this point it is clear that this was not an appropriate use of the 911 system and the service did not act appropriately in handling the call.”We are fully reviewing this incident. At this point it is clear that this was not an appropriate use of the 911 system and the Service did not act appropriately in handling the call.— Ottawa Police (@OttawaPolice) July 9, 2020We have reached out to and spoken with @IceFresh2 today. Further conversations will take place tomorrow where we will be offering a full and unreserved apology for our role in this very unfortunate incident.— Ottawa Police (@OttawaPolice) July 9, 2020 Bashizi said he would like to see the woman identified and charged with any applicable crime, although police say they have not laid any charges at this time.The Canadian Press has not been able to identify the woman involved.“I honestly want to know what was going on in her head at the time,” Bashizi said in an interview, adding that the woman was visibly afraid although he said he didn’t approach her throughout the interaction.“I just want to understand, or I want her to tell me what was so threatening about me. Why she allowed other people to walk by her but she couldn’t walk by me.”Bashizi’s brother, Joakim Bashizi, said the incident is an example of racial prejudice in Canada.“I need people — and especially white people — to understand that Black people do not have to explain themselves unless they’re committing a crime,” said Joakim. “You never see Black people going around and asking white people what they’re doing playing hockey in the middle of the street.”The two men say police have invited them for a tour of the station, where Ntwali said he’ll ask for the full audio from the 911 call.RELATED Toronto Raptors Make Silent, Powerful Statement For Black Lives Matter Armed Rideau Hall Intruder’s Safe Arrest Shows Systemic Racism: Singh Amy Cooper Charged With Filing False Report After Central Park Incident The incident comes months after an incident in New York’s Central Park, which a white woman called police after a Black man requested that she leash her dog.In that video, the woman — since identified as Amy Cooper — told the man that she’d call police and tell them he was threatening her.She then called police and told the operator that the man was threatening as he stood at a distance from her.Cooper has since been charged with filing a false police report and fired from her job over the May incident.She has apologized and said she reacted emotionally and made false assumptions about the man’s intentions.Elsewhere in the U.S., legislative measures have been proposed to criminalize discriminatory and racist 911 calls.The Caution Against Racially Exploitative Non-Emergencies (CAREN) Act, put forward by a San Francisco politician, is named after the slang term “Karen,” which has been used to describe white women calling police with outrageous and demonstrably false allegations against people of colour.With files from Associated PressThis report by The Canadian Press was first published July 10, 2020. Also on HuffPost:
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Manitoba Public Insurance CEO Ben Graham to step down in September
Global News has learned MPI CEO Ben Graham is leaving the position as of Sept. 30 to take a new job as president and CEO of Manitoba Blue Cross.
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‘Are you wearing protection?’: Daters struggle with COVID-19 compatibility
For some, COVID-19 concerns have forced thorny conversations about intimacy and exclusivity before meeting face-to-face.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
All systems go for NHL with ratification of CBA, return-to-play plan
The NHL and the NHLPA voted in favour of extending the collective bargaining agreement four more years and a return-to-play format that will see 24 teams compete for the Stanley Cup this year. The ratification votes mean that training camps will begin on Monday, with teams traveling to the hub cities — Toronto in the Eastern […]
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Toronto Sun
NHL ACTION: Leafs-Blue Jackets playoff preview
WATCH ABOVE as Lance Hornby lays out what might be ahead for NHL action in Toronto. What do YOU think? Tweet and Facebook us! And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel. 
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Toronto Sun
Haida matriarchs plan land occupation as fishing lodge reopens over objections
In a statement, the matriarchs known as "daughters of the rivers" say the Queen Charlotte Lodge is reopening as a local state of emergency remains in effect over the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
How to work from home without compromising your data and privacy
A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is the first and most important line of defense against nefarious cyber attacks
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Toronto Sun
The way Toronto is policed must be changed, members of public tell virtual town hall
Toronto Police Services Board has finished first two of four virtual town halls on police reform. Dozens of speakers were heard, not seen, on the board’s YouTube channel where many delivered a passionate message.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Edmonton officials recommend against recreational activities on the North Saskatchewan River
Edmonton Fire Rescue's chief of special operations is warning against people going on the North Saskatchewan River for recreational activities.
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Workers affected by Phoenix pay woes to get $350 million in compensation
OTTAWA – At least another $350 million will be added to the $2.6 billion cost of the badly mismanaged Phoenix pay system, as the government has reached a deal to compensate public servants for the stress and uncertainty the flawed payroll program caused. The deal announced Friday with the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) will see 140,000 public servants receive a lump sum payment of $2,500 in compensation. The payroll software, launched in early 2016, has been mired with technical problems ever since, public servants went unpaid, sometimes for months at a time and the system struggled to handle basic payroll functions, like maternity leaves or overtime. There were widespread reports of public servants being unwilling to pursue promotions because of fears Phoenix would wreck their pay. PSAC president Chris Aylward, said even people who got paid on time were hit by the system. “All of our members have been affected by Phoenix even if your pay was not interrupted. You still woke up on pay week wondering if you were going to get paid or not,” he said. “You put off promotions and acting assignments and stuff like that because you didn’t want your pay to change.” Government backs off, won't transfer nearly 3,500 RCMP civilian members to plagued Phoenix pay system New concerns over Phoenix pay backlog raised after employees' compensation gets cut Treasury board president Jean-Yves Duclos was unavailable for an interview Friday, but in a statement said he was pleased the government had reached a deal. “PSAC will receive compensation for the toll that the Phoenix pay system has had on their lives. This is a testament to our commitment to reaching fair and equitable agreements, mindful of today’s economic and fiscal context.” The government also settled a broader agreement with 84,000 PSAC members. That three-year deal will see employees get a total raise of 6.64 per cent and also includes new rules for parental leave and 10 days leave for people experiencing domestic violence. The deal still needs to be ratified. The Phoenix system was initially pegged as a cost-saving measure, but the parliamentary budget officer determined last year, by 2023, the government is likely to spend $2.6 billion dealing with the broken system, well above the initial projections and significantly more than the old system was costing. In 2018, the auditor general called it an “incomprehensible failure of project management and oversight.” The auditor also concluded managers had prioritized getting the system launched on time and on budget over making sure it actually worked. “In our opinion, the decision by Phoenix executives to implement Phoenix was unreasonable according to the information available at the time. As a result, Phoenix has not met user needs, has cost the federal government hundreds of millions of dollars, and has financially affected tens of thousands of its employees,” read the 2018 report. The system was designed and implemented under Stephen Harper’s Conservative government and turned on when the Liberals took office, despite warnings of problems. It replaced a 40-year-old payroll system and was set up to pay some 290,000 federal workers across the country. The government had offered PSAC five days of paid leave in Phoenix compensation and several other large government unions took that offer, but PSAC rejected it. Aylward said that offer was fundamentally unfair because the leave would have a different value depending on an employee’s salary. He said someone making $50,000 a year would receive much less if they cashed in that leave than someone making $80,000 even if they both suffered through the payroll system. The $2,500 lump sum is prorated based on how many years someone has been working with the government, but anyone who has been on the job since 2016 will receive the full amount. Aylward said Phoenix is working better than it once did, but the system continues to cause problems. “The number of pay issues have decreased but every single payday there’s still issues.” The deal also includes a process to allow public servants to be compensated if their lack of pay caused other problems, like late payment charges or fines. Several other unions have previously settled with the government over Phoenix, agreeing to the five days paid leave in compensation, but they negotiated a clause that saw them able to take part in a better deal if one was reached. Debi Daviau, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, who signed the paid leave deal, said they were still assessing what it would mean to them. “We are waiting for more details about this agreement to determine if and how it will impact our members, she said in a statement. If those other unions opt to take the $2,500 lump sum instead of the paid leave it will add tens of millions to the cost for government. The Liberals are working through a process to replace Phoenix completely with testing underway on one proposed supplier but no set date for launch of the new system. Aylward said when the then Conservative government decided to create Phoenix they forgot to actually ask the people who would use it. “There was no consultation with the unions. There was no consultation with the employees who were doing pay work.” He said so far the Liberals have moved more cautiously with Phoenix’s replacement. At the peak, the government had over 260,000 Phoenix related pay issues in its backlog as of May that number is down to 137,000 problems and the government is processing more problems than new ones are coming in. Twitter: RyanTumilty Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
Were Digital Dior and Chanel any good?
The first streamed couture shows were more like mini-movies, music videos, trailers and perfume commercials — there were some clothes, too.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Laid-off geologist overcoming COVID-19 crisis by creating sanitizing wipes business
The COVID-19 pandemic has been a real test for a lot of people. A Calgary woman took her unfortunate turn and transformed it into a viable growing business.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
COMMENTARY: Canada and the U.S. are neighbours but miles apart when it comes to COVID-19
The COVID-19 situation in the United States is almost out of control in many places, unlike in Canada where the curve has largely been flattened.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
B.C. SPCA South Okanagan branch seeking new home for abandoned dog
Staff at the South Okanagan Branch of the B.C. SPCA says a recently abandoned Pomeranian is “sweetest little fella who loves absolutely everyone.”
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
NHL post-COVID training camps bring optimism — and heightened expectations
Training camps are usually a time of optimism. Every team believes it has a chance to make the playoffs. This year, with 24 teams in the post-season, that optimism has never been higher as camps open up on Monday following a four-month break because of the coronavirus. But with optimism comes heightened expectations. Here’s a […]
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Toronto Sun
Limited version of Playland reopens with new COVID-19 precautions
"What we wanted to do was start with our most popular family rides, these are rides that are clearly geared at our younger thrill seekers."
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
City of Victoria seeks court order to move homeless people in Beacon Hill Park
The order would require homeless people to shelter in permitted areas of the park and prohibit them from sheltering in areas such as the Garry oak ecosystems, which is part of a protected and endangered natural system. 
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