Legal challenge to Quebec common law rules seeks equal rights for unmarried spouses
The case involves a woman and her former partner, a prominent Quebec businessman who contended he should not have to pay alimony because they were never legally married.
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Biden says lifting mask mandates a ‘big mistake’ as COVID-19 remains threat in U.S.
Biden said it is critical to remain vigilant about wearing masks, washing hands and social distancing as Texas and Mississippi rolled back restrictions and mask mandates.
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March 6 – Leading Edge Physiotherapy
Leading Edge Physiotherapy will be on Talk To The Experts this weekend!
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Saskatoon Blades throwing support behind Bobby Kirkness during cancer treatment
The Saskatoon Blades will be wearing special helmet decals this season in honour of locker room attendant Bobby Kirkness, who was recently diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer.
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March 6 – MacMillan Estate Planning
MacMillan Estate Planning will be on Talk To The Experts this weekend!
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COVID-19: Metro study to gauge how much music therapy can improve health-care workers’ mental health
‘I’m just very excited to try and find new ways to help them and to find new approaches to improving mental health,’ says study coordinator Shaun Fickling
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‘These young people were treated like pieces of furniture:’ Province under fire for decision to abruptly close youth jails and relocate children further away from their families
Some of the children — who are between the ages of 12 and 17 — were transferred hundreds of kilometres away from their home communities without any advance notice
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Quebec's minister for seniors considering policy on sex lives in CHSLDs
"A new policy should be unveiled by summer."
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LGBTQ2S+ organization Rainbow Railroad reflects on its mission a year into the COVID-19 pandemic
International LGBTQ2S+ organization Rainbow Railroad says it was 'tested' by the COVID-19 pandemic, but a year on it's reflecting on the 'silver linings.'
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Vaughn Palmer: B.C. defends decision to extend second-dose timeline
Analysis: Some 100,000 people who have already received their first doses will have to wait as long as another month to receive a second
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B.C.'s Endangered Killer Whales Need Winter Chinook Salmon To Survive: Study
VANCOUVER — Endangered southern resident killer whales would have a much better chance of survival if chinook were in their hunting grounds during winter off the coast of British Columbia, a new study says.The whales expand their menu and the distance they travel as they forage for food from October to March in the waters off California up to Alaska, which leaves them with little energy, says the study published Wednesday in the scientific journal Plos One.Brad Hanson, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said this is the first study that looks at the diet requirements of killer whales from their perspective.Hanson, fellow author Robin Baird and others collected and analyzed the prey and fecal samples of northern and southern resident killer whales for 13 years, starting in 2004.They found that chinook salmon made up almost all of the whales’ diet in spring but fell to around 70 per cent in mid-winter and plunged to about 50 per cent heading into the fall.Baird said the animals supplemented their diet with coho and chum salmon, as well as other fish including lingcod, halibut and flounder, which are bottom dwellers.Chinook salmon are energy denseOf all the fish in the sea, whales prefer chinook salmon because they are the largest, richest, most energy dense and easily intercepted, said Baird, who is a research biologist at Washington’s Cascadia Research Collective.“The whales have become these chinook specialists probably over tens of thousands of years because of the great availability of those fish,” he said in an interview Wednesday.“If the whales have to expend a lot more energy getting that prey then they basically get less bang for the buck.”The whales then don’t have enough energy to store fat that helps them keep warm in the cold waters. This leaves them weak and unable to reproduce, he said, adding most mothers are not able to feed a calf even if they do give birth.“Reproduction of southern residents is directly or indirectly related to chinook abundance,” he added.Chinook populations have fallen dramatically over the last 100 years by human actions including farming, the construction of dams, industrial activity and the destruction of estuaries, he said.All 14 stocks of chinook salmon that are preferred by whales are threatened, he said. These fish would move in and out of inshore waters at different times of the year and ensure a steady supply of food for the orcas.“Let’s say, just for sake of argument, there was one river that had 100 million chinooks that all came back during the same time of the year,” Baird said. “That’s going to be a lot less beneficial to the whales than 100 rivers, each of which have a million chinook and those chinooks all come back at different times of the year.”One way to ensure a steady chinook supply for orcas is to catch fish at the mouths of rivers after they’ve passed through areas where whales forage, he said.“Unfortunately, there is no one simple solution.”Overfishing and large-scale degradation of spawning and rearing habitat are some of the biggest threats to chinook salmon and by extension the southern resident killer whales, Baird said. The southern resident killer whale population is just over 70.Killer whales are top predators, which means they are often ecosystem indicators, he said. A reduction in the southern resident killer whale population is indicative of a degraded environment, which affects everyone, he said.“So, I think that killer whales are an indicator,” Baird said. “And the big question is whether or not we’re listening.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 3, 2021.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDOttawa Expands Protections For Endangered Southern Resident OrcasOrca Who Carried Dead Calf For More Than 2 Weeks Gives Birth AgainKiller Whales Pay Visit To Uncharacteristically Quiet Vancouver Shore
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Richard Littlemore: Permafrost carbon feedback could be the disaster that saves us all
Opinion: What if the thawing of northern permafrost turned out to be the catalyst that allows us not just to tackle climate change more effectively, but also to resolve additional global governance issues?
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‘Pillar of our life’: Calgary veteran, oldest SAIT alumnus Clarence Hollingworth turns 106
This is the second pandemic he has lived through.
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‘We were Black’: Surrey family questions RCMP after being ordered from home with their hands up
Blanche Monabeka and her three sisters, one of whom is just 10-years-old, were ordered from their home with their hands up, while police investigated a report of a weapon.
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Joint Canada-U.S. Rescue Operation Saves 31 People On Sinking Ship
HALIFAX — Canadian and American rescuers are describing a tightly choreographed effort in heaving Atlantic seas that saved 31 seafarers early Wednesday before an offshore scallop dragger sank off Nova Scotia.The hoisting of the crew aboard the 39-metre FV Atlantic Destiny onto helicopters began late Tuesday night and extended into the next morning after the ship caught fire at sea south of Yarmouth, N.S.Lt.-Cmdr. Edward Forys, commander of a United States Coast Guard fixed-wing aircraft that flew above the scene, outlined the close co-operation of the two countries in the frightening seas.“It (the Atlantic Destiny) was taking on water when we arrived and they didn’t have any power or ability to steer,” Forys said Wednesday in an interview from the coast guard base in Cape Cod, Mass. “So they were bobbing in the water and it was imperative we started to get people off that ship.”Additional Imagery of the FV Atlantic Destiny last night. pic.twitter.com/ISTmpCHBCr— HfxJRCC_CCCOS (@hfxjrcc) March 3, 2021He estimated that winds were gusting from the northwest at more than 90 kilometres per hour, with sea swells of between five to seven metres pitching the stricken ship up and down as the hoists were lowered.The lieutenant-commander said that at first, Canadian Forces CH-149 Cormorant helicopter lowered two of its search and rescue technicians on board the floundering vessel. He said the Cormorant carried out the first hoists, followed by lifts conducted by two American Jayhawk helicopters, with a total of 27 people brought into the rescue aircraft.The 43-year-old officer said it was the most hoists during one incident he’s witnessed in his 13-year career with the coast guard.Each time the basket came down to lift up crew, the two Canadian search and rescue technicians on board would help them strap in, as the teams from the two countries communicated by radio and international hand signals, Forys said.As this was going on, the American and Canadian fixed-wing aircraft were relaying information from the helicopters back to command centres on shore to provide updates on the condition of the survivors and indicate where they needed to be taken.Imagery of the transfer of the final four crew from the FV Atlantic Destiny and the two SAR Techs to the CCGS Cape Roger this morning. At 1036 AST, the FV sunk.The Cape Roger is now heading towards Shelburne, NS. pic.twitter.com/dAMrSPnwmK— HfxJRCC_CCCOS (@hfxjrcc) March 3, 2021Lt.-Cmdr. Brian Owens of the search and rescue co-ordination centre in Halifax, confirmed the Atlantic Destiny sank at 10:36 a.m. Wednesday morning after succumbing to damage it sustained in the fire. Owens said 27 crew members were taken to Yarmouth by the three helicopter crews during the night, where they received medical attention, food and accommodations.The remaining crew members, as well as two search and rescue technicians who were on board, were transferred at about 8 a.m. from the fishing vessel to the Canadian Coast Guard ship Cape Roger, Owens said, adding that they were on their way to shore on Wednesday afternoon.The rescue co-ordination centre said it had received a call from the ship around 8 p.m. Tuesday night reporting there was a fire on board and that it had lost power and was taking on water as it drifted in the rough seas and powerful winds.Ocean Choice, the owner of the ship, said other offshore fishing vessels, including the Cape LaHave, Maude Adams and the Atlantic Protector, took part in the rescue effort. “They’re professional seamen and we have an experienced captain and crew members that handled this incredibly well,” Ocean Choice CEO Martin Sullivan said in an interview Wednesday.“The collective efforts of our crew and all those who came to assist the crew and the vessel resulted in the best possible outcome for this situation,” Blaine Sullivan, the president of Ocean Choice, said in a statement. “We are sincerely thankful to everyone that helped ensure that every single crew member is safe and accounted for.”Ocean Choice said an investigation into what caused the fire will begin in the coming days, adding that no injuries were reported as a result of the fire. The company said the Atlantic Destiny, one of six of its offshore fishing vessels, harvests and freezes sea scallops. Its home port is Riverport, N.S.The Atlantic Destiny was involved in a similar incident in 2017 when its main engine broke down, causing a blackout on the ship while it was southwest of Nova Scotia. No injuries were reported.Martin Sullivan said the trawler had a major overhaul about a year ago and the ship was signed off by a classification society, which inspects and certifies vessels on behalf of Transport Canada.Meanwhile, Forys said the teams returning from the international rescue were tired but satisfied by Wednesday’s outcome. “This is a major case,” the lieutenant-commander said. “This is one of the search and rescue cases you’ll remember.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 3, 2021.With files from Sarah Smellie in St. John’s, N.L.This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDBoeing Calls For Airlines To Ground Dozens Of Planes After Denver Engine FireTiger Woods ‘Fortunate’ To Be Alive After Major Car CrashOntario Traveller Dies After Getting Lost On Vancouver-Area Mountain
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‘I waited so long:’ More than seven months after a Brampton man was accused of killing his ex-girlfriend then shooting himself, he has been formally charged with first-degree murder
Court records show that Darnell Reid was barred from having contact with Darian Hailey Henderson-Bellman when they were found suffering from gunshot wounds at the same Brampton address.
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180 John Deere employees losing jobs as Edmonton remanufacturing plant set to close
Agriculture and heavy machinery company John Deere is consolidating all of its parts remanufacturing in the U.S., meaning 180 Edmonton employees are losing their jobs.
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Canada sees 2,812 new COVID-19 cases as country receives first AstraZeneca vaccine shipment
Health authorities also reported 60 new fatalities related to COVID-19.
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County Official Plan back to committee level to deal with designations and boundary definitions
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Former staff, residents call for removal of managers at Street Workers Advocacy Project
Joined by the FSIN, a group of former staffers of the program alleged improper management contributed to the January 3 overdose death of a former resident.
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Sagkeeng First Nation mourns loss of another member in custody
A Manitoba First Nation is "extremely concerned and saddened" after it says a second community member in less than a month died while in custody.
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Benchmark price for single-family home in Central Okanagan now at $776K
The Okanagan real-estate market is currently red-hot, with the region seeing sizable increases of sales in recreation and vacation homes.
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Losing sense of smell could be early symptom of Alzheimer's, researchers find
Smell could be a "value added" diagnostic tool, says Charles Ramassamy, of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique.
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NDP wants Alberta government to make changes to post-secondary budget
The NDP describes the Alberta government's 2021 post-secondary budget as "devastating."
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Court rules that B.C. government efforts to limit trials in minor injury claims unconstitutional
Defeat could erase $390 million in savings projected for ICBC as a result of moving minor claims from courts to civil resolution tribunal.
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Calgary charitable organization hosting electronics recycling roundup amid COVID-19
A recycling event is part of the organization's efforts to provide housing and employment for people facing physical and mental challenges.
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‘It was a gut punch’: Shock expressed over impending closure of Penticton addiction treatment centre
Pathways Addictions Resource Centre has been providing addiction treatment services to South Okanagan residents for 47 years.
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Shell Canada employing ‘agile teams’ to power energy transition, reduce emissions
The president and country head for Shell Canada says its transition into a provider of cleaner energy is being driven by a network of "agile teams'' of employees.
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March is Musical Therapy Awareness Month in Vancouver
Pivoting from traditional event fundraisers, the new Turn Up for Music Therapy campaign was born
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University of Saskatchewan awarded $6.8M for bison conservation research
University of Saskatchewan researchers are working with the livestock industry and First Nations to develop the world’s first bison genome biobank for conservation research.
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Man pleads guilty to manslaughter, sentenced to 5 years for death of Saskatoon father
The 27-year-old is the first of four to see the end of his court proceedings regarding the death of Kevin Nataucappo. The other three are set for trial later this month.
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