Cogeco accuses Rogers, Altice of ‘bad faith tactics’ in takeover bid

In a letter released two weeks after Rogers and Altice USA Inc. announced a $10.3 billion offer, Cogeco's lead director says they failed to disclose to the public that they'd already rejected the previous night by the Montreal-based Cogeco.
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Walmart Canada to end its price-match program
One of the country’s largest retailers, Walmart Canada, will no longer offer its price-matching program come October.
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New COVID-19 cases in Ontario top 400 for second straight day
Ontario is reporting another increase in COVID-19 cases, recording more than 400 new infections for the second straight day.
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Doctors fear for the life of boy hit by car in Bas-St-Laurent region
Police say it appears the driver did not have time to react when the boy, who was with a friend, decided to cross Route 132.
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Thousands rally in Thailand’s capital, call for democratic reform
Organizers predicted that as many as 50,000 people would take part in the two-day protest in an area of Bangkok historically associated with political protests. A march is planned for Sunday.
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COMMENTARY: Helpful FAQs as kids go back-to-school with mandatory mask policies in place
Here are answers to some of the most common mask questions, from Dasantila Golemi-Kotra a biology, York University.
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Walmart, Amazon among donors to U.S. lawmaker promoting QAnon conspiracy theories
The corporate support for a QAnon-promoting politician is another example of how the conspiracy theory has penetrated mainstream politics, spreading beyond its origins on internet message boards popular with right-wing extremists.
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Ontario hospital workers’ union concerned with Doug Ford’s pharmacy testing plan
Ontario is expected in the coming days to unveil a plan to grant community pharmacies the ability to test for COVID-19 as it grapples with hours-long waits at some of the province's 148 assessment centres.
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Suspected impaired driver arrested following fatal pedestrian collision in Etobicoke: police
Police said they were called to the area of Kipling Avenue and Stevenson Road, just north of Finch Avenue, around 6:15 a.m.
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One man in custody for impaired driving after pedestrian struck and killed
Toronto police arrested a man for impaired driving after a pedestrian was struck and killed in Etobicoke.
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‘Move into the 21st century:’ George Floyd trial ignites push to allow courtroom cameras
The judge overseeing the case has yet to decide whether cameras will be allowed. Supporters of audio and visual coverage say the high-profile nature of Floyd's death, the outrage that led to worldwide protests, and courtroom restrictions caused by the coronavirus pandemic make this the right time and case to allow cameras in court.
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How Ginsburg's death could reshape the U.S. presidential campaign
A U.S. presidential campaign that was already tugging at the nation's most searing divides has been jolted by the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, potentially reshaping the election at a moment when some Americans were beginning to cast ballots.
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Karl Lohnes: Make the best of your small space for the long winter ahead
These tips for finding more storage and decorating for a lighter look will make your space look and feel larger.
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COMMENTARY: Here is how the winner of the U.S. election actually gets formally declared
The U.S. also differs from most other democracies in that it has no independent electoral commission to certify the final vote count, says Amy Dacey of American University.
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Emily Osmond’s family still wonders what happened 13 years after her disappearance
Tragedy struck twice for Myrna LaPlante and her family with the disappearance first of her aunt, Emily Osmond, then her nephew, Cody Wolfe.
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Heather Mallick: In midtown Toronto, condo dwellers fighting a highrise have no reason to complain
The latest NIMBY outbreak in midtown Toronto is an unusual one. It’s midrise condo owners in a neighbourhood zoned for condos who don’t want more highrise condos built near them. That’s not house-condo NIMBYism, that’s condo-condo, Heather Mallick writes.
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Nova Scotia residents concerned over dusty cement plant emission that coats cars
One Halifax resident says he witnessed a hazy cloud coming from the Lafarge cement plant Saturday night.
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COVID-19 task force worries Trump’s rush to approve vaccine will spook Canadians
Members of the task force say they are concerned about “vaccine hesitancy” in Canada, the phenomenon where people have doubts about taking a readily available vaccine because of concerns about its safety.
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2 dead, 14 wounded at party in Rochester, New York: police
Gunfire at a backyard party killed two people and wounded 14 others early Saturday in Rochester, New York, a city that has been roiled in recent weeks by outrage over the suffocation death of Daniel Prude.
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Russia's Navalny says he's now more than 'technically alive'
Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny said he is recovering his verbal and physical abilities at the German hospital where he is being treated for suspected nerve agent poisoning but that he at first felt despair over his condition.
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Ontario reports more than 400 new coronavirus cases for 2nd day in a row
Nearly 39,000 additional tests were processed, marking a record for the province.
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Manitoba RCMP looking for suspect with stolen vehicle, firearms
Police in Stonewall say a 24-year-old woman has been arrested but a male suspect is still at large, and believed to be armed.
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Police investigate robbery at Eastern Passage Needs store
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Ontario wasn't ready for the COVID-19 testing surge, even though it was entirely predictable
Dr. Andrea Chittle started sounding the alarm in late June. For weeks, the numbers at the COVID testing site where she works, in Guelph, Ont., had been climbing. “Today, we will likely perform 400 covid tests in #Guelph,” she wrote on Twitter on June 24. The current #ONhealth testing strategy is not rational. It is a waste of system resources.” The new demand, she said, was being driven by people who didn’t really need tests. They didn’t have COVID symptoms. They had no known exposures. They hadn’t travelled out of province. But the new mandate from the provincial government, after months of test austerity, was clear: anyone who wants a test can get a test. And so get them people did. Patients were coming in because they wanted to go to a wedding, or a cottage weekend with friends. Some were getting tests before seeing family. Others were getting them just for peace of mind, “’I haven’t contracted COVID from this possibly risky thing that I’ve done,’” Chittle said. Even back then, Chittle knew this was going to be a problem. She said so, publicly, online, all summer long. “We need to free up testing capacity in advance of (an) expected fall surge,” she wrote on August 19. Suffice to say, Chittle isn’t thrilled at how right she turned out to be. COVID testing centres in many parts of Ontario have been completely overwhelmed in recent weeks, driven, experts believe, by a mix of lax testing criteria, an increase in community spread and strict daycare and school rules that require anyone with a sniffle to get a test before returning to class. National Post View: Ontario's COVID-19 testing nightmare Marni Soupcoff: Withholding rapid COVID-19 testing just doesn't make sense Erin O’Toole, the new leader of the federal opposition, couldn’t get a test in Ottawa this week after being exposed to a known case. He had to go across the river to Quebec. One Ottawa testing centre reached its maximum daily capacity the moment it opened Friday morning. Online, tales abound of day-long waits in outdoor lines that stretch blocks and spill out into fields and parking lots. The thing is, experts and frontline workers say, this surge was entirely predictable. Chittle, among others, had been literally predicting it for months. “Not only should we have seen this coming,” said Dr. Isaac Bogoch, an epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto. “There are many who did see it coming and who were vocal about this.” The question now is, if that’s the case, why wasn’t the government ready? “It’s just absolutely shocking that we are where we’re at today,” said Dr. Andrew Morris, also an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto. “We’ve had months to do this.” After a slow start, Ontario rapidly ramped up its COVID testing capacity this spring. The province hit 10,000 tests a day in late April, 20,000 daily tests by late May and 33,500 on June 26. After that, growth basically stalled. The province didn’t hit 35,000 tests a day until last week. As of Sept. 17, it still had yet to hit 36,000. Those numbers were fine in a province still on lockdown, with schools out, daycares closed, offices still empty and cold and flu season still months away. But experts say the fall was always going to be worse. Was the current surge predictable? “Yes,” said Dr. Nitin Mohan a physician epidemiologist at Western University. “And I don’t even want to elaborate on that. It’s a yes. And it’s a yes with an exclamation point.” Right now, getting a COVID test in some parts of Ontario is an experience akin to buying a pair of Levi’s in communist Warsaw. Laura Desveaux came down with a mild sore throat last Friday. Her six-month-old younger son already had a runny nose, so when her symptoms didn’t go away by the next morning, she decided to get a test. That decision sparked a multi-day odyssey for Desveaux that saw her try four different centres, spend hours in lineups, on foot and by car, and still not come out the other side with a test. On her third try, at a Toronto-area hospital she had been turned away from the night before, Desveaux arrived in the morning to find a line that already stretched out of sight. “ You could see the front door, because it had wrapped all the way back around (the block),” she said. “I was like, this is insane. What happens when it gets colder?” Desveaux, who works in health care herself, had nothing but praise for the actual staff she dealt with. “They’re just overwhelmed,” she said. The question is, why don’t they have more resources? The National Post asked Health Minister Christine Elliott’s office why the province wasn’t more prepared for this surge. Anna Miller, a spokeswoman for Ontario Health, replied in a statement that the ministry is looking at allowing pharmacies to perform some COVID tests and is considering some new, more rapid testing technology. The province is also adding pop-up testing centres and increasing the hours at some existing sites in the hardest hit regions of the province, including Toronto, Peel and Ottawa. “As the ministry continues its broad capacity planning efforts into fall, the Testing Strategy will also evolve to ensure testing continues to be available to those who need it most,” she said. Experts, however, say all of that should have happened months ago. “Why are we not up to a capacity of a hundred thousand (tests) per day?” said Morris. “To me it is mind boggling.” For now, Bogoch and others believe, until the situation dramatically improves, the message should be made clear: if you don’t have COVID symptoms or known exposure, you shouldn’t be getting a test. “In a perfect world with infinite resources, it would be great to provide testing for everyone on a regular basis,” Bogoch said. But this is not a perfect world. It’s just Ontario. • Email: rwarnica@nationalpost.com | Twitter: richardwarnica
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Protests resume in Portland after smoke from wildfire clears
Protesters returned to the streets of Portland, Oregon, following a dayslong pause largely due to poor air quality from wildfires on the West Coast.
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Man, 33, found stabbed in east-end Montreal parking lot
Officers arrived at Bossuet and Notre-Dame Sts. at 5:45 a.m. Saturday after someone called 911 about “a man in distress."
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COVID-19 task force worries Trump's rush to approve vaccine will spook Canadians
Members of the federal government's COVID-19 vaccine task force are casting worried eyes at the Trump administration's political push to get a vaccine approved before the U.S. presidential election in November.
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Why is there a shortage of canned soda pop in Canada?
You may have been to a grocery store and searched for a 12-pack of your favourite soda pop, only to come up empty-handed.
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2 dead, 14 wounded after shooting at party in New York: police
As many as 100 people were at the gathering when the shooting started just before 12:30 a.m., Acting Police Chief Mark Simmons told reporters.
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Circus company 7 Doigts de la main is inching back into action
There is finally some light at the end of the tunnel as international shows resume
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Coronavirus: 3 dos and don’ts when it comes to social gatherings
Infectious diseases specialist Dr. Susy Hota joins The Morning Show to give tips on what people should and shouldn’t do while they socially gather.
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Invited to a pandemic wedding? Weigh your risks, experts say
Experts say COVID-19 rules are hard to maintain at intimate events, where family and friends are celebrating and drinking and dancing.
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13 of the week’s best long reads from the Star, Sept. 12 to 18, 2020
From an alleged hockey ‘conspiracy’ to going back to school in the age of COVID-19, we’ve selected some of the best long reads of the week from thestar.com.
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Canadian broadcasters say 40 TV stations and more than 100 radio stations will shut down over the next few years without government aid
Pandemic plus technological change have industry seeking relief from government, regulators.
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Nursing home doctors were repeatedly asked to visit residents during the COVID-19 outbreak. They didn’t come. As virus resurges, Ontario considers new rules
Three of the hospitals called in to help run beleaguered nursing homes have released reports that detailed physician absences.
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10 stunning moments you might have forgotten from Trump's presidency
As Americans gear up for the Nov. 3 election, CTVNews.ca looks back on some of the most stunning moments from Donald Trump’s presidency, from his glowing endorsement of North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un to expressing interesting in buying Greenland.
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg death: Here’s what could happen with the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy
The death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has thrust the Senate into uncharted political terrain, with no recent precedent for a vacancy on the high court so close to a presidential election.
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Nova Scotia residents concerned over dusty cement plant emission that coats cars
Some residents say they’re concerned about a shower of sticky, white dust from the Lafarge cement plant that landed on properties and vehicles.
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Admitted to Canada under pilot program, refugee nurses ready for work as PSWs
Despite COVID-19 travel restrictions that prevent most people from coming to Canada, the nurses were exempted, resettled under a pilot project to bring skilled refugees to the country.
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Two men in hospital after suspected targeted shooting in Richmond, B.C.
There was also no immediate word on the condition of the two men who were injured, and no suspect information was released.
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Hospital workers’ union concerned with Ford’s pharmacy testing plan
Ontario is expected in the coming days to unveil a plan to grant community pharmacies the ability to test for COVID-19 as it grapples with hours-long waits at some of the province’s 148 assessment centres.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
How death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg could reshape the U.S. election
A presidential campaign that was already tugging at the nation’s most searing divides has been jolted by the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, potentially reshaping the election at a moment when some Americans were beginning to cast ballots.
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