Watchdog probes death during SQ pursuit of speeder in Mascouche
As the motorist tried to leave the highway, he lost control of his vehicle and skidded off the road.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Activists warn coronavirus vaccine could be hoarded by rich countries
While no country can afford to buy doses of every potential vaccine candidate, many poor ones can't afford to place such speculative bets at all.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
A metre-long python's on the loose in Gatineau. Police say it's unthreatening
The local SPCA says the snake, which has been on the loose for days, simply rolls itself into a ball when it feels frightened or threatened.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
60 MPs urge sanctions against Chinese officials
A letter quoting the PM's own foreign minister calls on the government to take action against Chinese and Hong Kong officials over 'human rights atrocities' The post 60 MPs urge sanctions against Chinese officials appeared first on Macleans.ca.
Macleans.ca - Canada's national...
IN PHOTOS: A look back at the Pine Lake tornado 20 years later
It's been 20 years since a devastating tornado ripped through central Alberta, killing 12 people and injuring 100 others.
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Dutch duplex is a ship-to-shore innovation
Pirates and open seas inspired the design of the Freebooter duplex in Amsterdam
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Premier Doug Ford launching campaign-style tour of Ontario
Ford is going on an election-style summer tour of the province, making stops in places like Cambridge, Kitchener and Essex County, as they reopen after months of the COVID-19 pandemic.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
The hunt for a vaccine: Canadian company begins human testing of COVID-19 candidate
A Quebec City biopharmaceutical company began clinical trials on humans on Monday for a plant-derived COVID-19 vaccine.
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U.K. to stop using Huawei for 5G networks by 2027
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson ordered Huawei equipment to be purged completely from Britain's 5G network by 2027, risking the ire of China by signaling that the world's biggest telecoms equipment maker is no longer welcome in the West.
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Poll suggests Canadians are torn on scaling back COVID-19 benefits to save money
The poll suggests that Canadians are torn on whether the government ought to immediately and quickly begin to scale back pandemic support programs to keep the national deficit from flooding Canada’s future.
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Lethbridge city council passes bylaw banning conversion therapy
Lethbridge has joined a handful of other Alberta municipalities, including Calgary and Edmonton, in the banning of conversion therapy. 
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India’s coronavirus cases spike again, bringing total closer to 1 million
India has largely lifted its nationwide lockdown, and the virus has been spreading at a significant rate, prompting several big cities to impose partial lockdowns.
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Family ‘shocked’ after police release mug shot to identify Toronto homicide victim, advocate calls for review
'This will never go away. This will always be the last memory, particularly in these days of social media.'
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Bus driver in China deliberately crashed, killing 21 after house was demolished
A driver deliberately crashed a bus full of passengers into a reservoir in southwestern China, hours after discovering his house had been demolished, local police said Monday.
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QAnon conspiracy theory followers step out of the shadows and may be headed to U.S. Congress
This October will mark three years since the inception of the QAnon movement after someone known only as Q posted a series of conspiracy theories on the internet forum 4chan.
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Man charged after used condoms found on vehicles in Mississauga parking lots, police say
Peel Regional Police say a 74-year-old man is facing charges after used condoms were found tied to vehicles in parking lots of shopping centres across Mississauga. 
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A look at Huawei’s involvement in telecoms networks around the world
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to ban Huawei from Britain's 5G network on Tuesday, angering China but delighting U.S. President Donald Trump.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Quebecers most likely to resume hugging, hand shaking as COVID-19 fears persist across Canada: survey
Quebec might have been the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, but its residents are more willing than most Canadians to resume shaking hands with friends or attending weddings and funerals, according to a survey. In a coming poll by the Association for Canadian Studies, 47.8 per cent of French-speaking respondents said they would hug or shake hands with friends within the next six months, compared with just 33.5 per cent of English-speaking Canadians. It also found that 16 per cent of Quebec respondents would attend a sporting event, concert or play within the next six months, the highest among provinces along with Manitoba and Saskatchewan. That was followed by Atlantic Canada (15 per cent), Alberta (14 per cent), British Columbia (10 per cent), and Ontario (eight per cent). Asked when they would be willing to attend a wedding or a funeral, 24.1 per cent of French respondents said they would attend in the next six months, compared with 19.4 per cent of English respondents. The survey pointed to a wide disparity between the provinces (and the sexes) in their view toward the COVID-19 pandemic, which has entered its fifth month in Canada. It also underscored a broad hesitancy among many Canadians to return to so-called “normal life” following the first wave of viral spread. Thirty-one per cent of respondents across Canada expect that life will “never” return to normal following the pandemic outbreak, while 58 per cent say it will “take time” before they resume normal life. As COVID surges in the U.S., some experts worry about plan to further open up Ontario In Canada, the cases of COVID-19 and deaths are declining. Here's the story behind the numbers Quebec again had the rosiest outlook toward the staying power of the pandemic. The province had the highest proportion of respondents saying it would take some time before life returns to normal (66 per cent), and the lowest proportion saying it would never return (22 per cent). Ontario had the highest share of people suggesting life would “never” return to normal, at 36 per cent, followed by Atlantic Canada (32 per cent), Alberta (32 per cent) and British Columbia (31 per cent). “Quebecers — and francophones in particular — seem to not feel as threatened by the virus, and are less likely to think they’re going to get the virus,” said Jack Jedwab, president and CEO of the Association for Canadian Studies. The survey polled 1,517 Canadians between July 3 and July 5, with a margin of error of 2.5 points, 19 times out of 20. It also surveyed 1,006 Americans over the same period, with a margin of error of 3.1 points, 19 times out of 20. Results of the poll also showed a hesitancy to attend public events within the next year. The largest share of Canadians (51 per cent) said they would not attend a sporting event, concert, or play within the next year, with just 12 per cent saying they would attend in the next six months. Perhaps surprisingly, 13 per cent of respondents said they would “never” again attend a public event. Jedwab said those results conflict with ongoing attempts by various professional sporting leagues to resume competitions with live audiences, as he said demand to attend those events could remain stifled for some time. “There’s a very significant gap right now between getting professional sports back on track, and the nervousness that is being expressed in the survey about attending large-scale gatherings,” Jedwab said. “This may not be a temporary thing,” he said. “The ramifications of this going for one more season are very serious for lots of economies.” There was a significant gap between men and women around questions of attending public events, with 16 per cent of men saying they would attend in the next six months, compared with just eight per cent of women. Men are also more likely to shake hands with friends or family in the next half year, at 37 per cent, compared with 33 per cent of women. Across Canada, people aged 18-34 were more likely to resume attending events, with 17 per cent saying they would do so in the next six months. Eleven per cent of people aged 35-54 said they would attend within six months, and nine per cent of people 54 and up. Zain Chagla, disease specialist and associate professor at McMaster University, said the results fit broadly with past research that suggests women are typically more risk averse than men. “Young men tend to be the group that takes the most risks,” he said. “So that probably fits into that; young men have a bigger sense of being immortal or at least not susceptible to things.” Chagla said a broad avoidance of public gatherings, particularly sporting events or concerts with thousands of attendees, is likely to persist for some time as public officials continue to warn about the threats of the virus. But one-off interactions like hand shaking and hugging are likely to return to normal earlier, as people return to long-held habits. “It’s just so ingrained in our culture,” Chagla said. “We’ve been doing handshakes since the Middle Ages. We’ve been hugging for even longer than that.” • Email: jsnyder@postmedia.com | Twitter: jesse_snyder • Email: cnardi@postmedia.com | Twitter: ChrisGNardi
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
Carter or Bautista? High scoring or low? Canadian baseball survey uncorks a few surprises
Along with shorter games, respondents also want to see: a universal designated hitter (which will be tested this season), no leaving the batter’s box during an at-bat, a 20-second pitch clock and expanded playoffs. The responses in several categories, however, revealed a generational split.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
5 things to know for Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Canada has surpassed 108,000 total cases of COVID-19, with nearly 8,800 associated deaths.
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Terror suspect Mohamed Mahjoub wages legal war against feds to stave off deportation
A terrorism suspect is waging a new court fight against the federal government for information he says he needs to mount a full argument against deportation to his native Egypt and possible torture.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Coronavirus: Ontario’s top doctor thinks NHL’s COVID-19 testing plan works for all parties
Ontario's top doctor doesn't see COVID-19 testing capacity being an issue in the province once the NHL hunkers down in Toronto for its restart.
2 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Canadians torn on whether feds should scale back coronavirus benefits to save money: poll
A new poll suggests Canadians are torn on whether the federal government should tighten the taps on COVID-19 spending to keep the deficit from flooding the nation's future.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
‘It’s a death trap’: Families horrified by lack of air conditioning in long-term care homes
Many provinces across Canada do not require long-term care facilities to have air conditioning, even during a heat wave.
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Ontario health care workers to announce ‘political action’ in response to emergency orders
A spokeswoman for the union confirms that 98 per cent of its membership voted in favour of some form of political action over the weekend.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Allison Hanes: Struggling to make sense of sisters' senseless deaths
The search for Norah and Romy may have ended with the worst possible outcome. But the search for answers has only begun.
3 h
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Drive-ins fill the void while the brakes are on most live entertainment
Going to a drive-in event may not compare to a concert in a typical venue, but it feeds a hunger to consume culture outside of our living rooms.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Already binged everything on Netflix? Topic has your back
Topic's programming ranges from comedic talk shows to political documentaries you won't find anywhere else
3 h
Toronto Sun
Alberta report says Canada can't hit Paris climate targets without major hit to jobs and investment
EDMONTON — Canada’s economy will contract by $54 billion, with the loss of 300,000 jobs, should the country manage to reach its commitments made under the Paris climate agreement, says new research from Alberta’s energy war room. The Canadian Energy Centre — widely known as the “war room” created by Premier Jason Kenney’s government to fight misinformation about the oil and gas sector — argues that given policy promises in place now, even if all those are actually realized, there would still be an emissions “gap” of 112 megatonnes of greenhouse gases by 2030, the date by which Paris signatories must have their emissions slashed. “If you promise policy first and try and figure out a roadmap later you can hit a lot of potholes on the way to your goal and you may not reach your goal,” explained Mark Milke, the executive director of the Canadian Energy Centre. The Paris Agreement, signed in 2016, commits governments to reducing carbon dioxide emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels. In 2005, Canadian emissions were 730 megatonnes; to reach its Paris targets Canada would need to bring emissions in 2030 down to roughly 511 megatonnes. Using data commissioned from Navius Research, the report says that current policy announcements and measures in place — measures aside from the Paris targets — were expected to drop emissions to 657 megatonnes in 2030, from 714 megatonnes in 2015. That, obviously, is not reaching the Paris goal of 511 megatonnes. “These are not numbers picked out of the air,” said Milke. Alberta probe into foreign funding of anti-oil groups extended to October Alberta energy war room opens, ready to fight 'campaign of lies' against oil and gas industry According to the report, that amounts to a 112-megatonne “Paris gap” between the best-case emissions-reductions figure in Canada and the target the country committed to with the Paris Climate Agreement. The report also considers what impact bridging the “Paris gap” might have on investment in Canada. The Canadian Energy Centre uses an increase in the carbon tax as the mechanism to close the Paris gap. In order to achieve that, the carbon tax would need to be $116.02 per tonne by 2030. The 2020 carbon tax rate is $30 per tonne. In Alberta, the Paris target is 209 megatonnes, but this is lower than the achievement of the “promised policy,” which would decrease emissions to 263 megatonnes by 2030, leaving a gap of 54 megatonnes. The study notes that 54 megatonnes is nearly one-half of Canada’s overall Paris gap of 112 megatonnes, and reaching that target would be a burden on the western province. The report also looks specifically at the oil and gas sector. In Alberta, the Paris gap for the sector would be 24 megatonnes; this is just four megatonnes more than the emissions of the agriculture sector in the province. Under the scenario promised at present, investment will be roughly $375 billion in 2030. If the government manages to close the gap, investment will be roughly $19 billon less, for a total of just under $356 billion. In the Alberta context, the war room says investment in Alberta will be $95 billion in 2030 under the promised scenario. If the Paris gap is closed, it will be about $91 billion. More specifically, on the oil and gas front, the difference in investments between the proposed outcome and the Paris outcome is $3.5 billion less. Should the Paris gap be closed, GDP overall in the province will be down by $13.5 billion. Milke told the  National Post  that this doesn’t necessarily mean a contraction in the economy. Rather, the losses  are  money and  jobs that may have existed if the policies needed to reach the Paris commitments weren’t acted upon. “This is based on sacrificed GDP and foregone jobs, it’s not that we’re saying 2030 will be a smaller economy than in 2020,” Milke explained. • Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter: tylerrdawson
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
Montreal weather: A mixed bag with potential for a thunderstorm
Not quite as hot as last week, so that's good right?
3 h
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
ASK AMY: Rent-paying parent wonders where cheques landed
Dear Amy: I am retired. My grown daughter has always held a job and paid her bills on time. Because of the COVID virus, her income has dropped substantially. I offered to pay her rent, and have done so for the past four months. My concern is this: I write the cheque payable to the […]
3 h
Toronto Sun
What is Randonautica, the app that led teens to a dead body stuffed into a suitcase?
Randonautica, the latest craze to consume Gen Z, is an app that has led to a group of teens finding a dead body, another boy finding a grave with his last name on it and a teenaged girl reportedly witnessing a person get fatally shot. The app launched earlier this year, but started gaining more mainstream traction when the world went into lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. The basic premise of the app is to encourage users to explore “blind spots” in their so-called consciousness, but before they set off on their explorations, the user, dubbed a Randonaut, is urged to set an intention. Teens, filming a TikTok, find dead body in suitcase after using popular exploring app Randonautica When the app prompts a Randonaut to set an intention, it’s asking the user to think of something he or she hopes to encounter while exploring the area. Before venturing out, a person might think, for example, about dogs, intending or hoping to see a dog. Another person could set their intention as guidance, or even the colour orange. There are no rules as to what a person can set as an intention. Where the user goes is determined by a quantum random number generator. What the heck is a quantum random number generator, you ask, reader? Well, to keep it simple, there are random number generators (RNGs) and quantum random number generators (QRNGs). A simple random number generator can return a random sequence of numbers, however the results are not considered truly random. That’s because random number generators run by computers, which are inherently deterministic, have limits and predetermined number sequences that the generator spits out. @ughhenry Something traumatic happened that changed my life checkkkk
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
New Sci-Fi books to keep you one page ahead of the headlines
Technology and politics all figure in these latest titles, and they might just help us save the world
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
How do I stop my adult children from being so lazy and entitled? Ask Ellie
Young adult children back from school and in isolation with family need direction and definite expectations to avoid them becoming entitled.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
An updated $1.45M farmhouse surrounded by 50 acres: Home of the week
Spacious home 90 minutes from Toronto has original plank floors, a two-bedroom apartment, plus a horse barn and outbuildings
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Coronavirus: COVID-19 updates Toronto GTA Ontario Canada July 14, 2020
Meanwhile, Vice-President Mike Pence travels to Louisiana, which has re-emerged as one of the nation’s hot spots for the coronavirus only months after seeming to contain its outbreak.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...