Coronavirus deals 2nd blow to businesses in Toronto’s construction-laden Little Jamaica

Toronto's Little Jamaica, already walloped by years of heavy construction from the Crosstown LRT, has been dealt a second blow from the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Petition against mask mandate in schools concerning to Alberta teachers, health expert
A petition has been started questioning the use of masks by children in Calgary schools.
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Public office holders should spend carefully, Freeland says after report on Rideau Hall renos
Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland wouldn't say whether she believes the expenses were appropriate but she did say she thinks questions about them are legitimate.
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Poundmaker Cree Nation scholar wins $105K to rethink the education system
A PhD student at Concordia University in Montreal, Alexandra Nordstrom has been awarded a $105,000 Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship.
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Caisse CEO not ruling out further investment in Cirque du Soleil
Two conditions are necessary for the Cirque to succeed, Charles Émond says, less debt and a “strategic operator” who knows the industry.
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Frequent, intense snowstorms bad for certain breed of bird: Western University researchers
A recent study shows sparrows have increased stress levels when exposed to more frequent and severe winter storms.
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'Like a nuclear explosion,' Montrealer Estephan says of Beirut tragedy
For local boxing promoter, Tuesday's blast rekindles memories of carnage he witnessed while growing up amid civil war in Lebanon.
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Kremlin trying to denigrate Biden so Trump wins re-election, U.S. officials believe
U.S. intelligence officials believe that Russia is using a variety of measures to denigrate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden ahead of the November election and that individuals linked to the Kremlin are boosting President Donald Trump's reelection bid, the country's counterintelligence chief said Friday in the most specific warning to date about the threat of foreign interference.
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Canada Energy Regulator names Indigenous advisory committee
Canada's energy regulator has named a new advisory committee that aims to change how it interacts with Indigenous Peoples in Canada.
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Homeschooling Got A Bad Rap This Year. For Some Kids, It's A Game Changer
When my son’s school moved online in March, I, like many parents, hated it. There were too many moving parts, and I was overwhelmed trying to figure out things like where and when we were supposed to log in, in between attempting to get my own work done, as a freelance writer. My nine-year-old doesn’t know how to type, so completing assignments online took him forever. We don’t have a printer, meaning that I had to copy out the worksheets his teacher posted by hand so he could fill them out, which also took forever. On top of all that, I wondered just how much he could be getting out of it. Surely one hour of online teaching per day was a weak substitute for hours and hours of in-class learning? I assumed my son felt the same way as I did about distance learning. To my surprise, he actually loved it. He missed his friends, of course, but for him there ended up being a lot of upsides. Some of the positives were predictable: There was no morning rush to get ready and catch the bus. The condensed schedule meant he had hours of free time to do whatever he wanted. And he got a hot home-cooked lunch every day. Some were more unexpected, like the fact that being able to fidget or idly play with LEGO or even get up and walk around during lessons was actually hugely beneficial to him, both from sensory-seeking and learning perspectives. I’d always known my son processed information better when he was physically active, but my focus as a parent had been on helping him try to adapt to the classroom, to learn to sit still. Now that the learning environment had accidentally adapted itself to his needs, he was thriving. Previously a reluctant reader, by the end of June, he’d jumped several reading levels in the span of a few months. When I spoke to other parents about my son’s surprising appreciation of learning at home, I found out he wasn’t the only one.Sabrina Holland, a former high school English teacher who currently works as a technology director for an education non-profit, was also leery about distance learning at first. When her local schools in Bozeman, Montana, shifted online in the spring, she offered to oversee the education of her two step-children, Mikhail (12) and Louise (9), but she worried about how well it would work. She was especially anxious for Mikhail, who has a diagnosis of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and who, even with supports and accommodations at school, struggled to feel confident in the classroom. MORE FROM HUFFPOST PARENTS See How Classrooms Around The World Are Changing Because Of COVID-19 Refugee Teen Receives Laptop From Anonymous Donor Following HuffPost Story Prince William Says Homeschooling His Kids Is Testing His Patience  “The first two or three weeks were really challenging as we found our rhythm, but it was neat to be able to figure out the ways that he learned,” says Holland. Having one-on-one time with Mikail meant she could teach him new ways of tackling school assignments, like using the Pomodoro Technique for time management. “We did every optional assignment, we went hard, and he did so well. His confidence has skyrocketed. And now he knows the ways that he learns best, and how he can stay organized and approach new stuff.” Holland was amazed to discover that not only did Mikail take to distance learning easily, but his grades actually improved under the new system.Holland also credits the teachers in their district, who she says went above and beyond in making sure that kids were adjusting to distance learning. Their school board will be offering a hybrid plan in the fall, with the option for students to do everything online, and her family is seriously considering taking that route.Liz Moore, a distance learning teacher in Merritt, British Columbia, has known for a few years that her daughter does far better with online learning than conventional schooling. Seventeen-year-old Olivia, who has been diagnosed with autism, ADHD and anxiety, had always found face-to-face learning very challenging, even with classroom accommodations. Then, two years ago, she enrolled in an online class over the summer. Moore was skeptical at first, thinking that it might be too much for her daughter, but Olivia thrived. She could get up and walk around while learning, or play music – both of which are things that help her focus and that are (understandably) distractions for others in a classroom. She also found the predictable nature of online courses helpful.“In distance learning, you can see the entire course from start to finish, you know what your goals are, and the rubrics are so clear,” says Moore. “She always knew what was expected of her. And with the distance learning design, there’s no time limit, which means lots of time to review. It made it easy for her to succeed.”Olivia spent the next few years cross-enrolled, which meant that she was doing some classes online and some face-to-face. When all of her classes moved to distance learning during the pandemic, her engagement, enjoyment and grades all improved. Moore is hopeful her daughter will be able to continue to do all of her classes online in the fall. But while she’s glad they’ve found what works for Olivia, she worries, nonetheless, that not enough attention will go into offering families a range of educational choices, so they can opt for what works best for them. “I hope that every parent has the option to keep their kid safe – physically, mentally, emotionally, academically – which will look different for everyone,” she says. “We’ll need a bit of a buffet.”  Janine Hubbard, a registered psychologist who works with children in St. John’s, Newfoundland, isn’t surprised that some children who struggled in the classroom are succeeding when it comes to distance learning. She suspects it will benefit many children with a range of learning styles and needs: those who move at a faster or slower pace than their peers, those who need more movement or sensory input, those who process information differently. For children who have more of a self-directed learning style, online learning gives opportunities to delve deeper into topics that pique their interest. For children who have been resistant to using assistive technology in the classroom, due to embarrassment, it means they can do so without being observed or judged by their classmates.“It also means more participation in group discussions for kids with social anxiety or who struggle with communication,” says Hubbard. “And it gives them the opportunity to ask their teacher for help separately, through emailing or a private chat box [on their learning platform].”But, Hubbard cautions, it’s not automatically for everyone. Some students whose learning style might seem to lend itself to distance learning could still do better in the classroom, for a range of reasons: how much parental support is available at home, how much privacy they have, the level of access they have to devices and wifi. Hubbard echoes Moore about what education could and should look like going forward: “In an ideal world, we’d offer families the choice.”When it comes to my son, I’m not entirely certain what his future holds. I know that even though he enjoyed distance learning, he’s eager to be with his school friends again. It’s hard to figure out what would be best for him and, like many other parents, I go back and forth on what to do this September. But it does feel like a strange gift to suddenly have this new information about how he learns best that I might not have figured out, had there been no pandemic. If there is anything good that comes out of this awful time, maybe it will be a better understanding of how schools and parents can work together to customize learning for all the kids who operate outside the box. WATCH: HOW TO GET READY FOR HOMESCHOOLINGRELATED STORIES 5 Signs Your Kid Is Anxious About Going Back To School Dissatisfied Ontario Parents Are Making Pricey Choices For Back-To-School What Parents Should Look Out For In Their School's Reopening Plan
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Ottawa's retaliatory tariffs on U.S.-made aluminum could hit everything from washing machines to golf clubs
OTTAWA — Tariffs proposed by Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland on American-made aluminum products could extend into a wide range of consumer products in Canada, including everything from staples to washing machines to golf clubs. The retaliatory tariffs, floated on Friday in response to U.S. President Donald Trump’s 10 per cent levies on some raw aluminum products, is the latest salvo in a revived trade dispute between the two countries. Government officials estimate the Canadian tariffs will amount to roughly $3.6 billion on imported raw aluminum and aluminum products. They will come into force September 16 following a 30-day consultation. Mark Warner, lawyer at Toronto-based MAAW Law, said Ottawa’s response was restrained in the sense that it exclusively targets aluminum products, rather than escalating the dispute by introducing tariffs on a range of other goods. Even so, the move does widen the scope to include consumer products, unlike levies by Trump that exclusively targeted raw supplies of the metallic element. Canada and the U.S. signed a joint statement in May 2019 that limited retaliatory tariffs to in-kind imports, stipulating that only “affected sectors” could be included in reciprocal levies. “It’s a broad list of products, but narrow in the sense that we stuck to the terms of the agreement and it’s products containing aluminum,” Warner said. “It’s not as bad as it could have been — I feared that we might actually go beyond that to something outside the scope of the agreement itself.” Tariffs introduced by Ottawa will raise costs for Canadians, Warner said, but said those added costs are unlikely to make a noticeable difference to average consumers. The products that could be hit with a 10 per cent levy in Canada include livestock trailers, wheel rims for bicycles, nuts and bolts, aluminum foil, aluminum oxide, and even leg bands for migratory birds and pigeons, according to a proposed list supplied by Finance Canada on Friday. “The list is kind of spread out,” he said. “Are people going to even notice it when they go to buy the bicycle parts? Maybe not — it seems unlikely that they are going to get upset.” Canada to impose $3.6 billion in tariffs against U.S. in retaliation for aluminum duty in new tab Doug Ford calls U.S. aluminum tariffs a 'slap in the face' to Canadians, urges Ontarians to buy local Observers who spoke to the National Post said it was unclear what specific products might eventually be targeted under the proposed list. Michael Agosti, senior business advisor at Dentons law firm, said in a written response that the proposed tariffs by Ottawa indicated “no aim to proactively escalate” the ongoing trade spat. The response from Canada marks something of a departure from a host of tariffs announced by Ottawa in May 2018, which targeted up to $16.6 billion worth of steel, aluminum and a wide array of other unrelated products in retaliation for U.S. levies. Those tariffs, similar to the comparable tariffs levelled by the U.S., were eventually dropped in 2019. The decision by Trump to revive the trade war heaps more pressure on the Liberal government under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, which has already suffered a moderate drop in public polling amid the WE controversy. Some observers on Friday said the recent escalation in Canada-U.S. tensions is not entirely out of the ordinary, as disputes over trade between the two countries has persisted for decades. Canada, the U.S. and Mexico battled for years under Chapter 19 of the former NAFTA, which lays out a dispute mechanism for anti-dumping and countervailing allegations similar to those levelled by Trump this week. “It’s not like this is unusual,” Warner said of the recent scuffle. The Trump administration has made claims for years that Canada has been flooding the U.S. market with raw steel and aluminum products, which has in turn lowered market prices enjoyed by American producers. Canadian officials reject those claims. “Canada has been taking advantage of us,” Trump said in a speech Thursday, when he announced the tariffs would be re-imposed. The U.S. tariffs will come into force Aug. 16. Many U.S. lobby groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, has warned against the tariffs, saying it would only raise costs on American products like beer and household appliances. In a statement Thursday evening, Freeland called the levies “unwarranted and unacceptable.” Supplies of Canadian aluminum “strengthens U.S. national security and has done so for decades through unparalleled cooperation between our two countries,” she said.
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Nova Scotia union leaders happy to see Premier Stephen McNeil go
Disputes with teachers and health-care workers, as well as the film and forestry industries will all play a role in defining McNeil's time as premier.
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Boat Harbour Act decision likely Premier Stephen McNeil’s toughest, but telling for his legacy
Chief Andrea Paul of Pictou Landing First Nation said Premier Stephen McNeil's legacy will be that he kept his word on the Boat Harbour Act and ending environmental racism.
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Canadian Immigrants Share The First Photo They Took In Instagram Series
There is no universal immigrant journey, but many Canadian newcomers share a common experience: Someone back home misses them dearly and wants to see how they’re doing. Capturing the backstories behind this special exchange is “First Photo Here,” a new Instagram project that shares the first photos newcomers take in Canada. Watch the video above to see series curator Joella Cabalu share some notable submissions.From eating an iconic cheesy Canadian dish for the first time to anxious rain-soaked arrival woes, the Instagram page is filled with photos shared from around the country. Some are filled with wonder over snowy backdrops and mountain views; others snap cherished memories with family or friendly Canadians.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by First Photo Here (@firstphotohere) on Jul 15, 2020 at 11:40am PDT View this post on InstagramA post shared by First Photo Here (@firstphotohere) on Aug 5, 2020 at 11:12am PDTThen there are the less straightforward entries, that were clearly snapped for a specific audience: A sleeping silhouette, a shot of an open refrigerator. Of these ones, Cabalu makes ample use of Instagram’s caption format and gives space for people to reflect on what their life was like back then. Just as eye-opening are the entries where captions put a different spin on what viewers may assume. A selfie of a young woman in a parka, like that of project participant Huda, may appear fairly ordinary when we come across it on our social feeds. However, behind her portrait is a startling reality: Huda took the photo to inform her family of her safe arrival, right before applying for asylum. View this post on InstagramA post shared by First Photo Here (@firstphotohere) on Jul 21, 2020 at 11:01am PDTCabalu said the project is meant to bust stereotypes about how the newly arrived should feel about their newfound home. While some may feel ecstatic, not everyone’s first impression of a place they’ve never been to before will be pleasant.Other perspectives may be coloured by a rollercoaster of emotions related to leaving friends and family behind: Laura, a newcomer who fled violence in Colombia, wrote that she felt confused and unsettled when reflecting on her first photo.“We really wanted to challenge the narrative that immigrants should be grateful,” she told HuffPost Canada. “That is true, but at the same time they hold other emotions like loss and grief.”Done in partnership with the National Film Board of Canada, those interested in sharing their own photos with the project can submit via email or by filling out an online form.MORE BORN AND RAISED Refugee Shares Story Of Living Through Pandemic In Homeless Shelter If You Hate Anti-Chinese Racism, You Should Hate Anti-Black Racism, Too Syrian Refugee's Education Was First Derailed By War, Then The Pandemic Also on HuffPost:
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Concerns raised over $100M Centennial Bridge project following recent setback
N.B. Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Bill Oliver says barring new setbacks, the project should be completed in 2022.
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Trans Dad Yuval Topper-Erez Shares Stunning Childbirth Photos
“We have a right to exist.” This simple, but powerful statement on the importance of trans representation is why Yuval Topper-Erez recently decided to share his childbirth photoshoot with the world — intimate images of him sitting naked in a pool in England, during the home birth of his fourth child last year. In a Facebook album that’s been shared over 230,000 times, Topper-Erez is seen in ways trans men are not often seen: Trans dads are rarely represented, with childbirth especially seen as an act only cisgender mothers can go through. “The pictures were my way of saying we have a right to exist, to make our choices, to love, and to be respected,” he told PopSugar, following his remarks on international examples of transphobic laws. Topper-Erez kept the photos within his own social circles at first, thinking they would solely be a “beautiful memoir” for his family. However, that changed once he saw the finished results.“I suddenly got the sense that they need to be out there, as they represent so well two causes very close to my heart: Normalization of home birth, and normalization of trans and non-binary people giving birth,” he wrote in the album’s description. Topper-Erez’s emotions are on full display as he deals with birthing pains in the album. Throughout, he’s seen being cared for by family and supporters, including two midwives and a doula. View this post on InstagramA post shared by Yuval Topper (@yuvaltoppererez) on May 18, 2020 at 3:47pm PDTAbove all, the father of four hopes that the album is seen by other trans people, particularly trans dads-to-be. “I know how meaningful images like this could have been for me before my first pregnancy and how meaningful it is for me to see images of fellow birthing trans and non-binary people to this day,” he wrote.Topper-Erez gave birth to Tig, a happy, healthy baby boy last May. He’s continued to share Tig’s adventures, along with those of the rest of his family, on Instagram. View this post on InstagramA post shared by Yuval Topper (@yuvaltoppererez) on Aug 6, 2020 at 2:10pm PDTMORE ON TRANS PARENTING Gender Reveals Look A Bit Different When They're For A Non-Binary Teen What Fatherhood Means To A Trans Dad Raising Black Sons Fredericton Dad Gives Master Class In Supporting Your Trans Kid Also on HuffPost:
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Saskatchewan doctors want masks, smaller class sizes in back-to-school plan
Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe’s government plans to send students back to class in as normal a way as possible. There are some restrictions, but masks will not be mandatory and class sizes won’t be reduced.
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Vinay Menon: Is Britney Spears sharing creepy videos to send an S.O.S. to fans inside the #FreeBritney movement?
To thousands of fans, Britney Spears is no longer a pop star — she’s a prisoner. And after seeing a video of Spears trapped silently in a bizarre selfie loop, I can no longer dismiss #FreeBritney as an insane conspiracy theory, writes Vinay Menon.
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36-year-old man wanted on arson and mischief charges, Toronto police say
Officers say the 36-year-old man was involved in five separate incidents in the Woodbine and Danforth area dating back to July 11.
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Virtual Drake? Selected fans will be part of the Raptors playoff experience in Florida, where the games are starting to feel more real
There are about 320 “seats” occupied by the visages of fans that, in the case of the Raptors, will be chosen from the team’s season-ticket base of about 15,000 when the playoffs begin later this month. They expect to see regular “fans” at post-season games, meaning the likes of Superfan Nav Bhatia and global ambassador Drake might be there — so to speak.
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Saskatchewan government files court application against Tristen Durocher
The Regina Court of Queen's Bench confirmed a court application was filed Thursday naming Tristen Durocher.
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Ottawa man identified as homicide victim near Guelph, Ont.
OPP say a 25-year-old man from Ottawa was found dead on the road near Guelph, Ont., on Tuesday evening.
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Fredericton Regional Museum offers research material for a Black history curriculum
After Black Lives Matter New Brunswick unveiled their plans to integrate Black History into public schools the Fredericton Regional Museum offered decades of research and historical documents to enrich the program.
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Northumberland OPP investigate armed robbery at CIBC in Colborne, Ont.
According to police, a man entered the CIBC branch allegedly armed with what appeared to be a handgun, and allegedly stole money and a necklace.
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Heather Mallick: Here’s one thing the pandemic might change forever: officewear
Post-pandemic, work clothes will need to say, “I am competent. I can move nimbly from place to place, absorbing new information and acting on it,” Heather Mallick writes.
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Avoid all onions with unclear origins amid growing salmonella outbreak: warning
Do not eat any onions without knowing their place of origin, Canada's public health agency warns.
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Donald Trump wants a protectionist world. Don’t let him win
‘Self-respect demands that Ottawa stand up to Trump’s unjustified tariff. But let’s not lose sight of the real goal: defending a rules-based system of free and truly fair trade that benefits everyone.’
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Canadian man who was set to be deported from U.S. gets COVID in custody, dies
James Hill, 72, died at a Virginia hospital on Wednesday, four weeks after being transferred there from a nearby detention facility run by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).
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Child drowns in Rouge River, father in critical condition
Police say the two were swimming when the current took hold of the four-year-old girl, causing her father to swim after her.
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Quebec’s top doctor says a return to lockdown this fall is ‘unlikely’
Horacio Arruda, director of public health, told reporters that forcing people to stay home can have negative consequences on society, including for children and the elderly.
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Number of employees test positive for COVID-19 at Regina’s K-Bro Linens
A number of employees of K-Bro Linens’ Regina location have tested positive for COVID-19.
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B.C. unemployment rate improves to 11.1% in July with boosts in hospitality, tourism
New numbers from Statistics Canada show 70,200 new jobs were created in B.C. from June to July, mostly in service and producing industries.
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Canadian man in U.S. immigration custody dies after contracting COVID-19
A Canadian man died Wednesday night after spending months in a United States immigration detention centre where a large number of COVID-19 cases had been reported.
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Lebanese community in London, Ont., hosting vigil for victims of Beirut explosions
Londoners are invited to Victoria Park this Sunday for a rally and vigil to remember the lives lost in the Beirut, Lebanon explosions.
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Nova Scotia to provide $1 million to Lebanese Red Cross after Beirut explosion
Premier Stephen McNeil said today in a news release the Lebanese community has deep roots in the province, adding Nova Scotians are keeping the people of Lebanon in their thoughts.
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$55,000 in drugs, cash seized after home in Sarnia, Ont., searched: police
Sarnia, Ont., police say four people are facing drug-related charges.
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Founder of Juripop legal clinic resigns amid sexual misconduct allegations
Marc-Antoine Cloutier said no criminal complaint has been filed against him and denied wrongdoing.
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Collapse of Nunavut ice shelf ‘like losing a good friend,’ glaciologist says
The Canadian Ice Service says a huge chunk has broken off Canada's last fully intact ice shelf on the northwest coast of Nunavut's Ellesmere Island. The Milne Ice Shelf is 40 per cent smaller after the split that began late last month.
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Okanagan weather: Mix of sun and clouds, then warming temperatures
Environment Canada is forecasting slightly cooler weather for Friday, with sunny periods Saturday through Monday.
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Public-health officials gather in Montreal to discuss coming second wave
One in three Montrealers have reported the pandemic has had a considerable effect on their mental health.
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