Coronavirus live updates: Montreal will move to yellow alert today: report

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Case of Corey Hurren, who faces 22 charges in Rideau Hall incident, delayed until October
Corey Hurren is accused of ramming his truck through a gate at the Governor General's official residence on July 2.
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Catholic board reports COVID-19 case at elementary school in Niagara Falls
The school board's director says students and staff were exposed.
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Queen Elizabeth strips Harvey Weinstein of honorary title
Disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein is currently serving a 23-year prison term for multiple charges, including sexual assault and rape.
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Your job and COVID-19: Is it time to cut the work week to boost productivity?
Banks Benitez had great plans for his staff for 2020: a four-day week on full pay. Then the pandemic struck. The lockdown and economic downturn caused the chief executive and co-founder of Uncharted, a Denver-based accelerator helping start-ups aiming to solve social and community problems, to doubt whether the four-day plan would work. “The question became, is this the best time to do it? Or is it the worst time to do it? We had lost some funding and revenue and things were tight. We had to lay off a few people in early April.” It seemed logical to encourage workers to put in more rather than fewer hours. Yet after a few weeks of remote working, Mr Benitez saw employees were overloaded from video calls and juggling work with home schooling. “We decided [it] was not the worst time but actually the best time [to go to four days].” So in June, to boost productivity, he cut his 13 employees’ working week. Coronavirus has disrupted working life across the world. Many white-collar workers discovered they did not have to go to the office every day to continue to do their jobs. Yet it was not just where work was done that changed but also when, prompting some businesses to re-evaluate conventional nine-to-five (if you were lucky), five-day working patterns. Those who have had to work around childcare or other caring responsibilities have demonstrated that as long as the work is done, it may not matter when it takes place. A study of 3.1m remote workers in North America, Europe and the Middle East during the pandemic by the US National Bureau of Economic Research found that employees’ working days increased, and they attended more — although shorter — meetings. The report concludes, however, that it was “unclear if this increase in average workday span represents a benefit or drawback to employee wellbeing”. The data did not show whether workers were choosing to work around their family, or if the increased hours were “overwork due to the lack of clear delineation between the office and home”. There were also gender differences in the way working time was protected. According to research by the UK’s Institute for Fiscal Studies, during lockdown mothers’ work was more likely to be interrupted. “Mothers combine paid work with other activities (almost always childcare) in 47 per cent of their work hours, compared with 30 per cent of fathers’ work hours”, the IFS found. Gemma Dale, a human resources consultant and lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University, says that when it comes to debates about work in the Covid era and beyond, there has been too much focus on where work is done, rather than on the hours worked. “People are using this [period] as an opportunity of reflection. It is showing up in the desire to live differently,” she says. Executives have reappraised the necessity of commuting and business travel, for example. Though she acknowledges it is impossible to generalise about how reflective workers could be. “People’s experiences have been very different from being burnt out to baking banana bread,” she says. For those adults who did enjoy aspects of the restrictions to their lifestyle imposed by Covid-19, the Office for National Statistics found that many liked the slower pace. Almost nine in 10 (86 per cent) of adults who reported that they were enjoying spending more quality time with the people they live with wanted to continue doing so after the pandemic was over. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, author of Shorter, which lays out the case for boosting productivity through a shorter working week, says that working from home has also made employees think about how much time had been spent on “supporting activities” such as commuting and personal grooming. As offices open up, organisations may need to stagger start times. This could allow them to take in employees’ scheduling preferences, say researchers, including the times of day they are most productive, as well as helping to avoid overcrowding at work and on public transport. The key is consultation and predictability — lacking control over hours can harm employees’ wellbeing. Full pay for reduced hours? Against the backdrop of widespread job losses, employees will hardly feel able to dictate their working conditions. And shorter working hours on full pay will not be front of mind for employers struggling to keep their companies afloat. Heejung Chung, reader in sociology and social policy at the UK’s University of Kent, says: “What you will probably see more in companies is [they] get people to go on four-day week contracts to save costs. What happens to mothers all the time is the work doesn’t decrease, just the pay.” Many — particularly those on lower incomes — who have had their pay cut will want more hours rather than fewer. Campaigners for shorter working weeks argue that the four-day week could be a way of redistributing work. A recent proposal by Autonomy, a UK think-tank focused on the future of work, made a case for a shorter working time subsidy scheme to prevent lay-offs, reallocate hours and retain jobs as the German Kurzarbeit scheme does. Will Stronge, Autonomy’s director of research, recognises that most businesses’ priority is survival. Nonetheless, he says, this downturn is different to previous ones. “The financial crisis [of 2008 resulted in] job losses. It didn’t disrupt the way people were working. At the same time, there’s been a swell of new policy and thinking around the future of work, around automation and welfare.” In May, New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, raised the prospect of four-day weeks to boost leisure and travel industries. Whatever the rationale, reducing hours needs careful planning. In May, Uncharted’s staff were given a month’s notice to prepare to reduce their working week by clarifying goals and streamlining work. “It was really figuring out what we say ‘no’ to,” says Mr Benitez. All employees were asked to be available on Mondays to Thursdays between 10am and 3pm for meetings and collaboration but otherwise they could arrange their time themselves. While Fridays are the company-wide day off, Mr Benitez wants to ensure flexibility, for example, a parent working five short days to fit with school hours. After monitoring progress through an independent evaluation, he is convinced of the benefits of the four-day week. On average, the working week reduced 23 per cent from 45 hours. Some employees were concerned that by making every hour count, there was less room for fun, although that could also be a result of remote working during a pandemic. Plans for a four-day week had already been under way before the pandemic at 3D Issue, a software company based in Donegal, Ireland. But Paul McNulty, founder and chief executive, says the crisis has sharpened his resolve to cut hours as a way of attracting new talent in a competitive local market. When the working week was cut, he saw “greater happiness among employees. Some of them talk about having a day to themselves when kids go back to school. They are more refreshed and engaged.” For David Cann, managing director of Target Publishing, it was coronavirus-induced financial difficulties that pushed him to make difficult decisions. “To get us through this we needed to take a 20 per cent pay cut to ride the wave. I didn’t feel quite comfortable. For people on a lower wage it felt like a big ask.” So he cut hours too, giving everyone Fridays off. “The team started to work well together. We produced the same amount of magazines.” He says his 20-strong workforce are not working compressed hours but rather that they are more efficient — remote working had shown Mr Cann that meetings could be streamlined. “It’s early days but it feels right. What that’s achieved is thinking you shouldn’t be scared of change. Covid makes you think differently — I probably wouldn’t have done this unless it was forced on us.”
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Peterborough family dispute leads to assault charges: police
Peterborough police say two people were taken to hospital following a family dispute that turned violent.
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Wasaga Beach resident charged after interfering while firefighters respond to blaze: police
Police say a man released a dog that he said was trained to attack.
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Bill Zacharkiw's Wines of the Week: Sept. 18, 2020
A pinot noir that's worth the extra five cents, a big red to finish off the barbecue season, an expressive verdicchio and a Champagne that justifies the cost.
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New ‘Toronto’ sign unveiled at Nathan Phillips Square
'This new and more durable Toronto sign will ensure that it continues to be part of our city’s landscape for years to come,' Mayor John Tory said.
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OPP seize 235 cannabis plants in Caledon, Ont.
Police say that a Cannabis Act warrant was executed on Wednesday and that officers seized 235 cannabis plants that were about five to seven feet in height.
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Doug Ford makes an announcement ahead of the Throne Speech: Live video
Ontario's premier will be joined by Québec Premier François Legault, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney The post Doug Ford makes an announcement ahead of the Throne Speech: Live video appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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New Brunswick reports no new COVID-19 cases on Friday
One case remains active in the province.
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Housing deal 'a victory,' now give us the details: Quebec mayors
Nationally, the agreement will see $55 billion invested in low-cost housing during the next decade to construct.
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A More Comfortable COVID-19 Test Is Coming For B.C. Children
VICTORIA — British Columbia is introducing a new saline gargle test for students from kindergarten to Grade 12 to help make COVID-19 testing easier for children and teenagers.Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said B.C. is one of the first places in the world to use a mouth rinse gargle test for the new coronavirus.“Unlike the [nasal] swab, this is a new saline gargle where you put a little bit of saline water, that is sterile water, in your mouth, you swish it around and spit it into a little tube,” she said at a news conference Thursday.“This test is kind of cool and something we’ve had in the works for a while. This new method is more comfortable, particularly for our younger children.”It is developed by a B.C. company, which reduces the province’s dependency on the global supply chain, she said.Henry described the test as more efficient, which shortens the long lineups and wait times. READ MORE B.C. Nurses Will Soon Be Able To Prescribe Drugs To Help Curb Overdose Deaths Is Halloween Cancelled Because Of COVID-19? What Parents Should Know Will There Be Another Lockdown? Not In The Way You Might Think B.C. Closes Nightclubs And Banquet Halls As COVID-19 Cases Climb Getting tested is key in the fight against the pandemic and the test will make it easier to collect samples from young people, she said.The test can be done without a health professional by parents or children themselves.With schools reopening, Henry said the focus of this new and “easier” method of testing will be on children until there are more supplies.“And we’re hoping to make it more broadly available as we go forward.”The province announced a record daily high of 165 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday and one additional death, bringing the death toll to 220.There has been a total of 7,663 cases of COVID-19 in the province.Watch: B.C. laid out their winter coronavirus plans last week. Story continues below.  The uptick is caused by a combination of increased testing, awareness and contact tracing, Henry said.“Remember that today’s cases are people who have been exposed over the last two weeks.”The province tested 7,674 people for COVID-19 on Wednesday, the highest number of COVID-19 tests ever conducted in B.C. in a single day.Health Minister Adrian Dix reminded people to keep groups small and limit social gatherings.“So, this weekend, and as we plan for Thanksgiving in the fall months ahead, let us once again close ranks on COVID-19, and change its course,” he said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 17, 2020.
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Bloc Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet tests positive for COVID-19
Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet has been diagnosed with COVID-19, the party has confirmed.
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Guelph is opening more recreation centres
The Victoria Road Recreation Centre is resuming operation after it served as the city's assessment clinic for six months.
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With Cake, N.L. artist Barbara Pratt celebrates her late mother Mary Pratt
The pans are empty, save for the carefully placed parchment paper lining the bottom, and both cast long shadows on the edge of the wooden table. Barbara Pratt first took pictures of them a decade ago, when she was baking a wedding cake for her brother. “They looked so gorgeous, empty like that, and I...
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Soccer club plays socially distant game, loses 37-0 to merciless rival
Players on the team tried to maintain two metres of distance while their opponents scored goal after goal in Germany.
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Forecast models show hurricane Teddy could hit Maritimes next week
The storm was churning northward in Caribbean today, with maximum wind speeds over 200 kilometres per hour.
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The Right Chemistry: What, exactly, poisoned Russia's Alexei Navalny
Blood tests confirmed the presence of a nerve agent in the system of the opposition politician and anti-corruption activist.
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Canada-U.S. border closure extended to Oct. 21
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair says the partial closure of the border with the United States is being extended another month, to Oct. 21.
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Peterborough police use drone to help locate 3 teenagers lost in woods
Three teenagers reported they were lost in the woods in Cavan-Monaghan Township on Wednesday afternoon.
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Killer parties: University students' get-togethers are putting lives at risk, officials warn
University officials say students may face ‘significant penalties’ for flouting COVID-19 guidelines as part of an effort to cut down on ‘superspreader’ events, warning that outbreaks sparked by students put vulnerable communities at risk.
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No known active cases of COVID-19 are reported in Nova Scotia
The province says 1,166 negative tests were completed on Thursday, and 86,031 in total.
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Tatiana Maslany cast as lead in Marvel’s ‘She-Hulk’ TV show
Tatiana Maslany, born in Regina, SK, hasn't had a leading role since sci-fi show 'Orphan Black' ended in 2017.
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Queen anuls CBE honour bestowed upon Harvey Weinstein, now a convicted rapist
Queen Elizabeth II has cancelled the honorary Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) accolade bestowed upon Harvey Weinstein, the former film producer and mogul, according to a notice in The Gazette , the U.K’s paper of public record. Variety reports that the move comes after Weinstein’s conviction in February of committing a criminal sex act in the first degree and rape in the third degree. The former chief of movie studio Miramax still faces five charges of felony sex crimes in Los Angeles. “The Queen has directed that the appointment of Harvey Weinstein to be an Honorary Commander of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, dated 29 January 2004, shall be cancelled and annulled and that his name shall be erased from the Register of the said Order,” read the notice in The Gazette.  Weinstein was at one point one of the most powerful men in the Hollywood film industry, holding sway over big-budget productions and the careers of hundreds of workers in front of and behind the camera. That all came to a halt beginning in October 2017, after articles in The New York Times and The New Yorker included accusations from actresses and others who detailed their accounts of the producer’s past predatory behaviour including rape, harassment and sexual assault. Since then, more than 80 women, including many big-name actresses, have come forward with stories accusing him of sexual misconduct stretching back decades.  The award conferred by the Queen — the Honorary Commander of the Civil Division of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) — is conferred to those who have made a “distinguished, innovative contribution to any area.” Weinstein and his brother Bob’s company Miramax had produced many feature films in the U.K., perhaps most notably the 1998 seven-time Oscar winner “Shakespeare in Love” starring Judi Dench (playing Queen Elizabeth I), Gwyneth Paltrow, and Joseph Fiennes.    Recipients of the honour conferred by the British monarch are “expected to be, and remain, good citizens and role models.” These honours can be withdrawn at any time for a number of reasons, which according to the regulations can include “being found guilty of a criminal offence, behaviour which results in censure by a regulatory or a professional body, or any other behaviour that is deemed to bring the honors system into disrepute,” according to Variety . The group behind the decision is the Forfeiture Committee which can revoke an honour when a recipient has been found guilty of a criminal offence and has been sentenced to more than three months of imprisonment. Weinstein is currently serving a sentence of 23 years for rape and sexual assault in upstate New York.   You might also be interested in … Martha Stewart’s ‘gourmet-flavoured’ weed gummies ready for public Stuck inside? Cannabis may help in getting some chores done Net fail: Drone delivering weed to friends in jail downed when caught in security fence Read more on The GrowthOp, the grownup’s guide to cannabis news and culture
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8 Great Movies From TIFF You'll Want To See This Year
A virtual film festival is a strange thing. There’s none of the usual fanfare. No directors introducing their movies to packed auditoriums, no industry hobnobbing, no tangible momentum for what would have been the launch of another typical awards season. Those of us covering the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) over the past week have done so from our computers, streaming titles that would otherwise be seen on a big screen. Without the energy of an audience, it almost feels like the event didn’t happen at all.And yet it did, with 50 features on the lineup instead of the usual 300. A few of them have already seen glory, like “Bruised,” Halle Berry’s directorial debut, which reportedly sold to Netflix for a hefty $20 million. The Frances McDormand drama “Nomadland,” meanwhile, generated some of the year’s best reviews, as did Spike Lee’s concert film “David Byrne’s American Utopia.” Even in a year as off-kilter as 2020, autumn will bring with it a number of prestige projects to hold our attention.Of the movies I saw during TIFF, here are eight worth your time. (FYI: For some odd reason, “Bruised” did not screen for press during the festival, so I wasn’t able to see it.)"Nomadland" “Nomadland” is an adjective movie. The second it ended, my mind was swimming with them: beautiful, serene, painterly, honest, heartbreaking. I could keep going, but you get the idea. This is a film so full of emotion that no single word can capture its power. For her third feature, director Chloé Zhao cast Frances McDormand as Fern, an itinerant widow who lives out of her van and finds short-term gigs throughout the American West (an Amazon fulfillment center, restaurants, manual labor, whatever she can get). Fern’s story isn’t unique; she is part of a community of kindhearted nomads unable to sustain the country’s white-picket-fence fantasy in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. “Nomadland” observes her as she adjusts to life in the wild.Zhao’s first two films, “Songs My Brothers Taught Me” and “The Rider,” starred mostly nonprofessional actors, establishing her as a virtuoso who thrives with limited resources. Here, she gets a bigger budget and a movie star but still maintains the verisimilitude that makes her work seem excerpted from someone’s diary. McDormand is surrounded by first-time performers, and what she achieves amid their rawness ranks high in her already impressive career. Her weathered face telegraphs the anguish and euphoria of human connection.“Nomadland,” which takes inspiration from Jessica Bruder’s 2017 nonfiction book of the same name, asks how an individual might function when distanced from the conventions of modern life. It is far more than an “Into the Wild”-type saga about a hippie communing with nature, though Zhao seizes plenty of opportunities to emphasize the great outdoors’ allure. This is a miniaturized character study about a population not often legitimized in the American imagination. It is ravishing. I’m not sure we’ll see a better movie this year.“Nomadland” is scheduled for release on Dec. 4.Searchlight Pictures"One Night in Miami" Oh, to be a fly on the wall when famous people talk to other famous people without the public’s prying gaze. “One Night in Miami,” Regina King’s feature-length directorial debut, imagines what one particularly electric meeting of the minds might have looked like. On the evening of Feb. 25, 1964, Cassius Clay won a high-stakes boxing championship against the supposedly unbeatable Sonny Liston, after which Clay (played by Eli Goree) met up with three other titans: Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) and NFL fullback Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge). Amid the swelling civil rights movement, “Miami” shows the four friends at personal and professional crossroads, determined to use their positions for good but unsure how to move forward as figureheads of such a critical era in American history. Kemp Powers adapted “One Night in Miami” from his 2013 play of the same name. Even though the dialogue’s rhythm can’t escape its theatrical roots, this quartet’s philosophical quandaries are well worth King’s lens. The heart of the movie is one rambling, thorny conversation about race, religion and cultural gatekeeping. (“Taking the world on your shoulders is bad for your health,” Cooke tells Malcolm X.) What does it mean to fight for equality when few agree on how to achieve it? And does the burden of fame — living up to a tokenized image assigned by supporters and detractors alike — turn a person into an ouroboros steadily losing his sense of self? King minimizes any stylistic flourishes to let her actors shine, especially Ben-Adir, who captures Malcolm X’s intellect with a wise blend of charm and fury. What a night indeed.“One Night in Miami” will be released by Amazon, but no date has been announced.Amazon Studios"David Byrne's American Utopia" The opening number in David Byrne’s recent Broadway show, “American Utopia,” is about how much of the human brain goes unused, an apt sentiment given how dumb the United States has seemed over the past few years. In between Talking Heads classics and songs from his recent solo album, Byrne talks about forces that have dulled civilization, specifically an unwillingness to welcome others’ perspectives. His monologues are short and poetic, political but not preachy. They complement his smooth musical vistas, during which Byrne surrounds himself with 11 dancers and instrumentalists whose movements form a chorus representing the best of what people can do when they operate as a community.Spike Lee directs this filmed version of “American Utopia” with panache. His camera swirls around the performers’ motion, cutting between closeups and wide shots that accentuate the sharp choreography. A blue glow that functions as the stage’s spotlight lends the movie an immersive feel, like we are privy to the deepest workings of one artist’s mind. Byrne is an egalitarian, letting each member of his troupe flourish and thereby underscoring his message about the shared human experience. With Lee’s help, he has crafted one of the all-time-great concert films — a treat for longtime fans and newcomers alike.“David Byrne’s American Utopia” premieres Oct. 17 on HBO.HBO"The Truffle Hunters" After premiering at Sundance in January, “The Truffle Hunters” is building momentum by making the fall-festival rounds. Michael Dweck and Gregory Kershaw’s lovely documentary follows a handful of aged truffle excavators — humans as well as their trained dogs, who do most of the actual hunting — in Northern Italy. On the surface, the film depicts a niche business through the eyes of a select few. But what’s really on display is a lifestyle, specifically one that revolves around the bond between canine and human. With lush cinematography and a commitment to the folksiness its subjects represent, “The Truffle Hunters” is one long swoon.“The Truffle Hunters” is scheduled for release on Dec. 25.Sony Pictures Classics"Shiva Baby" “You look like Gwyneth Paltrow on food stamps,” Danielle’s mother (Polly Draper) tells her. They’re attending a shiva, but Danielle (Rachel Sennott) can’t even remember who died. She’s a mildly discombobulated college senior tired of questions about what she’ll do after graduation and who she’s dating. Already inconvenienced by nosy relatives, Danielle encounters among the mourners two people she’d rather not: a high school ex-girlfriend (Molly Gordon) and the wealthy man (Danny Deferrari) who’s been paying her for sex despite arriving with his wife (Dianna Agron) and newborn. Over the course of 77 taut minutes, “Shiva Baby” goes from cringe comedy to bristling psychodrama and back again.Emma Seligman expanded “Baby” from a short film she made at New York University. Even with such an accessible running time, Seligman only narrowly avoids stretching the premise to its breaking point. And yet the movie’s biting wit keeps everything afloat. As Danielle careens through one nuisance after the next, the shiva house becomes increasingly claustrophobic, much like the mental state of any 20-something awaiting the supposed self-actualization of adulthood. “Shiva Baby” heralds a sparkling new talent in Seligman, who understands how to blend screwball humor with profundities about what it means to discover yourself. “Shiva Baby” does not yet have a release date.Courtesy of TIFF"Concrete Cowboy" “Concrete Cowboy” gives familiar coming-of-age tropes a fresh setting: urban cowboydom. When unmoored Detroit teenager Cole (Caleb McLaughlin of “Stranger Things” fame) gets expelled from school and sent to live with his semi-estranged father Harp (Idris Elba) in Philadelphia, he finds himself drawn to the community of horse wranglers with whom his stony pops has made a home. Harp calls them “cowboy orphans,” the last of a fading breed trying to maintain their sense of place as developers seek to gentrify the land they occupy. Adapted from a 2011 novel by Greg Neri, “Concrete Cowboy” is a delicate, sure-handed debut for director Ricky Staub. Juxtaposing inter-city grit with opulent orange skies, Staub has the hand of a jazz maestro, gliding the movie along with ease. Some subplots — particularly one concerning Cole’s cousin (Jharrel Jerome), who's embroiled in a clichéd neighborhood drug ring — are undercooked, but the core father-son drama is masterfully rendered. Elba’s marble-mouthed weariness and McLaughlin’s pleading eyes complement their characters' search for a companionship neither knew he needed. “Concrete Cowboy” does not yet have a release date.Courtesy of TIFF"Summer of 85" This beachside romance has shades of “My Own Private Idaho” and “Call Me by Your Name,” applying its sumptuous but nonintrusive gaze to two French teenagers as they embark on a scorched fling. When budding young writer Alexis (Félix Lefebvre) capsizes his sailboat one afternoon, he is rescued by a dashing conundrum of a boy (Benjamin Voisin) who quickly becomes his first love. Ever-sensual director François Ozon (“8 Women,” “Swimming Pool”) makes clear from the start that their courtship is doomed, giving the film a thrilling sense of danger. Ozon’s metaphors get a bit heavy-handed, but “Summer of 85” is effective nonetheless, unfolding more like a memory piece than a coming-of-age enchantment. “Summer of 85” does not yet have a release date. Courtesy of TIFF
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1 In 4 Canadian Credit Card Users Couldn’t Make Payments This Spring: Survey
TORONTO — Nearly one in four customers of the major credit card companies were unable to make monthly payments this spring, according to a survey released on Thursday by J.D. Power.J.D. Power’s May and June survey of more than 6,700 credit cardholders also suggested that consumers whose income was dented during the COVID-19 pandemic were generally less satisfied with their credit card companies.John Cabell, director of banking and payments intelligence at J.D. Power, said that Canadian credit card companies are “falling behind in key areas related to the customer experience.”“In terms of what customers say is most important, the biggest is terms — interest rate, credit limit and fees — and making sure that those things align with customer expectations. And what we’re seeing right now is that customers are more sensitive in that area,” said Cabell in a phone interview from the U.S. J.D. Power said that while overall credit card satisfaction is flat compared with last year, what has changed is that people are less satisfied with the companies’ online help and call centre service. The survey indicated that wait times at credit card companies’ call centres hit 12 minutes during the pandemic, compared with less than eight minutes prior to the pandemic.The annual survey — which weighs factors such as benefits, credit card terms, customer interaction and rewards — comes in the wake of COVID-19 accommodations that allowed some people to defer payments.Watch: These are the best credit cards for those in a financial pinch. Story continues below. Since J.D. Power fielded its survey in May and June, other data have shown that households are now resuming monthly payments that were on hold this summer.As of the end of July, the average deferral rate for personal loans and credit cards at the Big Six banks fell to 4.3 per cent, down from 9.6 per cent in April, according to RBC, which said that banks deferred payments on nearly 470,000 credit cards.By August’s end, Scotiabank said that credit cards were its smallest source of payment deferrals (compared with auto loans and mortgages), noting that after deferrals ended, 96.8 per cent of customers remained current with their payments.But J.D. Power suggested that credit card companies should still consider changing tack amid an uncertain economy.“There still seems to be a fairly conservative approach to the use of credit cards … That is likely to change over time, as more consumers are able to eventually begin using their card again for things like travel and dining out. But it’s going to be a slow process,” said Cabell.“Locally, there may be some areas where restrictions are lifting or the economy seems to be brightening up a little bit. But there’s still a lot of anxiety or stress that consumers have about their financial future right now.”RELATED Here’s How Bad Credit Can Affect Your Mortgage Canadians Spending More Now Than Before Pandemic Refinancing Your Mortgage Can Save You Money Overall, respondents favoured Tangerine Bank, American Express and Canadian Tire cards the most, and Canadians were generally more loyal to their credit card issuers than U.S. cardholders. The polling industry’s professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error because they do not randomly sample the population.Cabell said that consumers are favouring straight-to-the-pocketbook perks, such as extending the duration of annual fees, over extras such as discount airline tickets. Separate data from Ratehub.ca from around the same period suggested that more consumers were shopping for cards that offered secured credit or cash back. Travel rewards cards are still popular — though less so than in 2019 — but retailer rewards were on the decline, Ratehub said.Mikael Castaldo, Ratehub’s manager of everyday banking, said that issuers such as American Express are bringing new cash back cards to the market, as consumers seem to gravitate toward cash, as opposed to low interest rates or balance transfers.While it’s early days, even if customer service is lacking, Castaldo cautioned that it may not move the needle in the current economy.“It kind of breaks into two categories. On one hand, you have consumers that had a really bad experience and are looking to switch. But I think, overall, the majority are reluctant to switch financial institutions at this time,” said Castaldo.“They might be worried that they may not be approved for a credit card. The rate of switching might actually go down — but that’s really just speculation right now.” This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 17, 2020.
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Walmart confirms 3 employees at north London location test positive for COVID-19
Three employees at the 1280 Fanshawe Park Rd. west location tested positive.
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The scariest thing about this Halloween is how quiet it's going to be
"Oct. 31 is close, but in terms of epidemiological results, it's an eternity away," Quebec public health director Horacio Arruda says.
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Waterloo police investigate reports of gunfire in Cambridge
Waterloo Regional Police continue to investigate a report of shots fired at a home in Cambridge early Wednesday.
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Teen shot in Hamilton’s east end: police
Hamilton police say a teen was hit by gunfire overnight on Friday.
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Tatiana Maslany Is Perfectly Suited To Become ‘She-Hulk.’ Here’s Why.
When news broke yesterday that Tatiana Maslany would star as She-Hulk in an upcoming series on Disney+, the actress’ name immediately started trending on Twitter.Although Maslany hasn’t confirmed the news, which was first reported by Deadline, people were overjoyed at the prospect of seeing a super talented Canadian star helm a major Marvel Studios production, including one Bruce Banner.Mark Ruffalo, who plays Banner (a.k.a. The Hulk a.k.a. She-Hulk’s cousin) in the Marvel movies, congratulated Maslany on her new gig via a tweet yesterday afternoon.Welcome to the family, cuz! @tatianamaslany#SheHulkhttps://t.co/VXcaE9Fine— Mark Ruffalo (@MarkRuffalo) September 17, 2020But stans of the actress — known as the Clone Club — know it’s about time Maslany star in a major production like “She-Hulk.” Not only did she play multiple characters in the critically acclaimed series, “Orphan Black,” for five brilliant seasons, but she’s won a ton of accolades for her work, including multiple Canadian Screen Awards, Constellation Awards, and an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series (for “Orphan Black”). For the uninitiated, here are a few reasons Tatiana Maslany is perfectly suited for “She-Hulk.”1. She has incredible rangeMaslany played 14 — YES, FOURTEEN — characters on “Orphan Black.”everyone saying they've never heard/don't know who tatiana maslany is go watch her emmy winning performance in orphan black NOW pic.twitter.com/3R8KNMy9CC— alyssa (@deanoruu) September 17, 2020The characters (most of whom are clones) range in age, gender, and personality. One of these characters was a hallucination of a talking scorpion that Maslany voiced. Yes, Maslany is so talented she can even convincingly play a hallucinated arachnid.So, taking on a character who turns green and bulks up when they’re enraged? Easy peasy.2. She reportedly almost landed a lead role in a Star Wars filmAccording to the Hollywood Reporter, Maslany tested for the lead role in the first “Star Wars” spin-off film, “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” back in 2015. Now of course we know the role of Jyn Erso went to Felicity Jones (and she rocked it), but at the time, Maslany fans knew she would have been a perfect fit in the “Star Wars” universe.Star Wars films these days are not unlike Marvel films in that both feature strong, independent, and kick-ass women who have depth and nuance. It’s a credit to Maslany’s talent that, although she missed out on hoodwinking Stormtroopers, casting agents and directors saw something in her that made her perfect for “She-Hulk.”According to Variety, Maslany’s She-Hulk will do more than just fight bad guys: Jennifer Walters (She-Hulk’s alter ego) will be “able to retain most of her personality, intelligence, and emotional control,” even when she hulks up.3. She played one of the most bad-ass women on televisionIf you’re a Clone Club member then you know who we’re talking about: HELENA. (We would have also accepted Sarah, Cosima, and Rachel. No offence to Alison — love ya!)Helena, one of the many clones Maslany plays on “Orphan Black” is not to be messed with. An orphan who was taken in by a couple who trained her to be a killer, Helena is ruthless and a survivor who has escaped near death countless times. But she’s also loyal and will literally kill to protect her loved ones, which are, admittedly, few and far between.And while it may not seem there’s many similarities between playing a Ukrainian killer who’s an excellent shot with a sniper rifle and a woman who’s an attorney by day and an Avenger ... also (probably?) by day, Maslany will be able to effortlessly channel Helena’s thirst for vengeance into She-Hulk’s fight for justice.Details on the new series are scarce — it’s just one of several Marvel projects in the works and no release date has been announced — but we’re pretty confident Maslany is going to nail it. RELATED Tatiana Maslany's Praise For Her Emmy Competitors Was So Canadian ▶Our Favourite Clone Has Strong Words About The Term 'Strong Woman' 'Orphan Black': 10 Things You Need To Know Also on HuffPost Canada:
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