Crime Beat podcast: Narrowing in on a killer — the Kelly Cook story

Global News crime reporter Nancy Hixt shares the latest leads in the hunt for Kelly Cook's killer.
Read full article on: globalnews.ca
Trump declares himself ‘future’ of the Republican party in CPAC speech
Trump fervor at the four-day event has been so strong that Trump's son Donald Trump Jr. declared it "T-PAC" and participants rolled out a golden statue of the former president.
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Vancouver gender reveal party host fined $2,300 for breaking COVID-19 restrictions
Police shut the party down and issued a ticket to the host under the COVID Related Measures Act.
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A Quick Reminder That The Golden Globes Are A Scam
In normal, non-plague years, the Golden Globes are a fun awards show to watch. They honour movies and TV, so there are a lot of good categories and relatively little filler. (Sorry, sound-mixing enthusiasts.)Unlike the Oscars or the Emmys, the awards typically happen over dinner. That means the celebrities are drinking throughout, and often get looser and more fun towards the end of the night. Take, for instance, Emma Thompson presenting a screenplay award barefoot with a martini in her hand, tossing her heels behind her, or Brendan Fraser’s now-iconic full-body laugh at a since-forgotten joke about Martin Scorsese.For all these reasons, the awards ceremony is an entertaining watch. It’s a show we’ll be tuning in to (or at the very least, watching the highlights from). But it’s important to remember that the awards themselves, for all intents and purposes, are a total scam.The Golden Globes are voted on and presented by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Who is that, exactly? Their names aren’t publicly available, but according to their website, it’s a non-profit group made up of 87 international journalists based in Southern California. Sounds prestigious, right?Some of them do work for well-respected overseas outlets. But according to the LA Times, many members of the HFPA work at obscure or unknown publications. And many of them are rich people with very little journalistic experience or output: the newspaper identified one member as Yola Czaderska-Hayek, a socialite, party host and writer who calls herself “the First Polish Lady of Hollywood.” Another is Alexander Nevsky, a Russian bodybuilder who segued into producing and has had bit roles in several action movies.I think I'm the only producer who can lift 100 pound dumbbells and the only bodybuilder who votes for @goldenglobes and produces films..
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Gregor Chisholm: Teoscar Hernandez doesn’t want to be a DH. The Blue Jays should pay attention after the best stretch of his career
After waiting several years for Hernandez to develop, the last thing this organization should be doing is messing with the outfielder’s routine just a few months removed from a Silver Slugger performance, Gregor Chisholm writes.
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Will Ontario’s summer camps be allowed to open? Here’s how they're trying to make it happen
The odds are looking better for overnight camps to resume operations in Ontario this summer, but there are no guarantees as more contagious variants of COVID-19 remain a wild card.
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New Program Tackles Vaccine Hesitancy By Connecting Experts With Community
When it comes to vaccine hesitancy, misinformation and mistrust sparked by “medical racism” are among issues confronting scientists, doctors and community groups trying to provide assurance as immunization programs roll out across Canada.Dina Guarin, 56, hasn’t decided if she’ll get vaccinated but said her sister, a nurse in Seattle, has already been immunized.“Will it be safe? Will it really keep us from getting COVID?” Guarin said from Vancouver.She said she knows someone who’s worried about possible long-term consequences including infertility and that her 81-year-old mother and others in the Filipino community want information in Tagalog.Tara Moriarty, an infectious diseases researcher at the University of Toronto’s faculties of dentistry and medicine, started a project in January to host seven-nights-a-week Zoom sessions with residents and staff of long-term care and retirement homes, along with family members, in order to provide reliable information on vaccines.“I had no idea when we started about just how much need there was,” said Moriarty, whose past experience as a personal support worker in Montreal had her concerned about the slow deployment of vaccine and the potential for widespread deaths, especially among older adults.The initiative is run by COVID-19 Resources Canada, which Moriarty co-founded last March, and has expanded so anyone hesitant about getting vaccinated could join to get their questions answered by a rotating group of about 30 volunteer health-care experts.They include virologists, pharmacists, family doctors and scientists who offer jargon-free explanations.Moriarty said some of the top questions asked include how vaccines could have been developed in under a year and whether they can be administered to people taking certain medications, pregnant women or those with a chronic illness.“There are no talking heads,” Moriarty said of the experts’ conversational approach as they also address issues like bogus treatments being promoted online and the findings of the latest clinical trials.The project has been so successful that she has also started daytime Zoom sessions for unions representing health-care workers.Helps experts understand concernsPrital Patel, a public-health scientist with a PhD in medical biophysics from the University of Toronto, is a regular participant in the sessions and said they also provide experts like her a chance to understand the concerns of people as they “let their guard down” if they’re hesitant about being immunized.“As scientists, we’re a bit oblivious to what people are hearing on the ground and the kinds of misinformation that’s leading them to perhaps become a bit hesitant. So we can actually really try and speak to the truth and the science behind everything in a way that’s understandable.”Those who may have experienced racism in the health-care system and are disproportionately affected by the pandemic are a key focus for her, Patel said from Sydney, Australia, where she is working on a project to understand the risk factors associated with health-care workers becoming infected with COVID-19.“As a person of colour, I’m there to represent any people who are from the South Asian background who may not speak English,” said Patel, who speaks Gujarati and Hindi as well as some Kiswahili, which she learned in Kenya.British Columbia and Ontario have prioritized immunization for Indigenous communities, and federal Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller has said the government is working with other provincial and territorial health authorities to prepare mass vaccination programs for First Nations, Metis and Inuit communities.In northern Ontario, for example, residents of 31 remote communities, mostly of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation, are currently being inoculated as teams of health-care workers are deployed there for a weeklong stint.Dr. Lisa Richardson, an internal medicine specialist and a strategic lead in Indigenous health at the University of Toronto’s faculty of medicine, said she will be part of a team going north this week.The initiative headed by Ornge, the province’s air ambulance service, requires health-care providers to take nine hours of training in Indigenous cultural safety to work with vulnerable communities that have historical reasons for vaccine hesitancy, Richardson said.“When I talk about vaccine hesitancy, I actually invert it and I say, ‘problems with the health-care system that have led to vaccine hesitancy.’ So, when you start to explain that historical context, people can then situate the mistrust in that,” she said.“As an Indigenous practitioner, I hear about stories of mistreatment in the health-care system, even just locally, every week. So, it’s an ongoing problem,” said Richardson, noting the example of Quebec resident Joyce Echaquan, who posted a video of herself being verbally abused as she lay dying in hospital last October.Richardson said people who get adequate information about COVID-19 vaccines feel empowered to make their own choice, and the vast majority of people in Indigenous communities are getting immunized.“You’re going to mull it over and make the decision yourself. That’s really key so that it’s not forced because there’s been so much forced activity in health care, things that are done without consent.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 28, 2021.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDToronto Will Prioritize Vaccinating People Living In SheltersAstraZeneca's COVID-19 Vaccine Approved By Health CanadaOntario's Vaccine Rollout Should Prioritize Both Neighbourhood And Age: ExpertsVaccine Access Urgently Needed For Migrants, Undocumented Workers
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Police: Winnipeg rides-for-hire stabbing leaves 2 injured
The suspect stabbed both the female driver and the male victim who was keeping her company during the rides after an argument ensued.
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Brewing for a good cause: new Nova Scotia craft beer creations support local community
New brews released in the province support the Black Loyalist Heritage Centre, Change is Brewing Collective and a local food bank.
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P.E.I. urges residents in their 20s to get tested for COVID-19 amid uptick in cases
P.E.I. recorded six new COVID-19 infections on Saturday, all among people in their 20s.
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Protestors calling on federal government to sign emergency order to save Île-Perrot forest
Protestors against deforestation of the White Oak Forest in Île-Perrot say their calls have been ignored, as clear cutting has continued over the last two weeks.
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‘This was my father’s focus: keep Chinatown alive’: Vancouver business icon Jack Chow dead at 90
"He was most proud of being in Chinatown and and serving the Chinese community," his son Rod Chow said.
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20 bison re-introduced to Poundmaker Cree Nation
Poundmaker Cree Nation is hoping to grow their recently acquired bison herd by the 100s after welcoming them back to the community on Feb. 19.
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Faceoff failures killing Canadiens’ offence | HI/O Bonus
Habs’ young centres are experienced growing pains.
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‘Suicide can happen to anyone and any age’: Warning signs to look for
Every year, one in six Albertans will seriously consider taking their own life and more than 400 will die by suicide, according to the University of Alberta.
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Is A Federal Election Coming? The Way The Parties Are Acting Might Suggest So
OTTAWA — All federal party leaders maintain they don’t want an election in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic but the Conservatives appear to be pursuing a strategy that could give the Liberals justification for calling one.Liberals are accusing the Conservatives of systematically blocking the government’s legislative agenda, including bills authorizing billions in pandemic-related aid and special measures for safely conducting a national election.The Conservatives counter that the Liberals have not used the control they have over the House of Commons’ agenda to prioritize the right bills; other parties say both the government and the Official Opposition share the blame.“They’re playing politics all the time in the House. It’s delay, delay, delay and eventually that delay becomes obstruction,” the Liberals’ House leader Pablo Rodriguez said in an interview.“It’s absurd. I think it’s insulting to Canadians and I think people should be worried because those important programs may not come into force ... because of the games played by the Conservatives.”He pointed to the three hours last week the Commons spent discussing a months-old, three-sentence committee report affirming the competence of the new Canadian Tourism Commission president.That was forced by a Conservative procedural manoeuvre, upending the government’s plan to finally start debate on the pandemic election bill, which contains measures the chief electoral officer has said are urgent given that the minority Liberal government could fall at any time if the opposition parties unite against it.A week earlier, MPs spent three hours discussing a committee report recommending a national awareness day for human trafficking — something Rodriguez said had unanimous support and could have been dealt with “in a second.”That debate, also prompted by the Conservatives, prevented any progress on Bill C-14, legislation flowing from last fall’s economic statement with billions in expanded emergency aid programs and new targeted aid for hard-hit industries.That bill was introduced in December but stalled at second reading, with Conservative MPs talking out the clock each time it did come up for debate. After eight days of sporadic debate — more than is normally accorded for a full-fledged budget, Rodriguez noted — Conservatives finally agreed Friday to let the bill proceed to committee for scrutiny.Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole has argued that “modest debate” is warranted on C-14, which he maintains is aimed a fixing errors in previous rushed emergency aid legislation.Last December, the Conservatives dragged out debate on Bill C-7, a measure to expand medical assistance in dying in compliance with a 2019 court ruling.For three straight days last week, they refused consent to extend sitting hours to debate a motion laying out the government’s response to Senate amendments to C-7, despite a looming court deadline that was extended Thursday to March 26.Conservatives note they offered the previous week to extend the hours to allow a thorough debate but the government waited five days before tabling its response to the amendments.For Rodriguez it all adds up to “a pattern” of obstruction aimed at blocking the government’s legislative agenda.Procedural machinations are commonly used by opposition parties to tie up legislation. But Rodriguez argued it’s inappropriate in a pandemic when “people are dying by the dozens every day.”If the government held a majority of seats in the Commons, it could impose closure on debates. But in the current minority situation, it would need the support of one of the main opposition parties to cut short debate — something it’s not likely to get.In a minority Parliament, Rodriguez argued, all parties share responsibility for ensuring that legislation can at least get to a vote.But Conservative House leader Gerard Deltell lays the blame for the legislative impasse squarely on Rodriguez.“The government House leader has failed to set clear priorities, and has therefore failed to manage the legislative agenda,” he said in a statement to The Canadian Press, adding that “my door is always open for frank and constructive discussions.”Bloc Quebecois House leader Alain Therrien agrees the Liberals have “mismanaged the legislative calendar and must take their responsibilities.” But he doesn’t exempt the Conservatives.He said their obstruction of the assisted-dying bill and another that would ban forcible conversion therapy aimed at altering a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity is “deplorable.”“These are files that require compassion and rigour. It is inexcusable to hold the House hostage on such matters,” Therrien said in an email, suggesting that O’Toole is having trouble controlling the “religious right” in his caucus.Both Liberals and Conservatives want election: NDPAs far as NDP House leader Peter Julian is concerned, both the Liberals and Conservatives are trying to trigger an election.“We believe that is absolutely inappropriate, completely inappropriate given the pandemic, given the fact that so many Canadians are suffering” he said in an interview.Julian accused the Liberals of bringing forward unnecessary legislation, like the election bill, while”vitally important” bills, like one implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and another on net-zero carbon emissions, languish.The Liberals’ intention, he said, is to eventually say there must be an election because of “all these important things we couldn’t get done.” And the Conservatives “seem to want to play into this narrative” by blocking the bills the government does put forward.Veteran Green MP Elizabeth May, however, agrees with Rodriguez, who she says must be “at his wits’ end.”“What I see is obstructionism, pure and simple,” she said in an interview.She blames the Conservatives primarily for the procedural “tomfoolery” but accuses both the Bloc and NDP of being “in cahoots,” putting up speakers to help drag out time-wasting debates on old committee reports.“It’s mostly the Conservatives but they’re in league,” May said.“They are all trying to keep anything orderly from happening that might possibly let the Liberals say we’ve accomplished a legislative agenda. Whether the bills are good, bad or indifferent is irrelevant in this strategy.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 28, 2021.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDNDP Calls Out Liberals For Voting To Kill MP’s Pharmacare BillTories Back Failed Bloc Bill To Make French Mandatory For Quebec ImmigrantsProrogation ‘Saved’ Trudeau From WE Charity Scandal: Opposition MPsNDP Pledges To End For-Profit Long-Term Care In Pre-Election Pitch
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Rosie DiManno: ‘Major league stupid:’ Toronto cop accused of harassing female cadets while awaiting discipline for forcing himself on a woman in a McDonald’s bathroom
Lawyer for Toronto Const. Michael Fernandes says the officer plans to plead guilty to the latest disciplinary charges.
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Okanagan snowmobiler rescued by helicopter after suffering back injury
A VSAR spokesperson believes having the helicopter available for the rescue helped ensure the patient wasn't injured further during transport.
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COVID-19: Outbreak up to 23 cases at Peterborough student residence
The health unit cites a "private gathering" at the student residence home to 200 students.
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Man fatally shot by Tofino RCMP during confrontation in First Nations village
RCMP went to a home in Opitsaht after receiving a report of a woman in distress.
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Saskatchewan reports no new coronavirus deaths, 141 new infections
The government of Saskatchewan is reporting 1,662 new vaccinations across the province.
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A look at coronavirus measures across Canada as spring break approaches
Canada's pandemic hotspots are taking diverging approaches to handling the COVID-19 crisis as spring break nears.
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In the Habs' Room: Ducharme sees signs of progress as overtime woes persist
"Normally, working, putting in the effort and performing well as we did this evening, that produces results," said the new Montreal Canadiens coach.
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‘Enormous opportunity’: Regina developer helping Sask. cash in on gaming market
Kai Hutchence, CEO of Regina's Massive Corporation, moved home from game development hotspot Ontario to grow the industry locally.
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Jack Todd: Habs need more imagination behind the bench
Dominique Ducharme took the most conservative possible route through his first two games behind the bench by playing not to lose, rather than going for it.
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B.C. should prioritize essential workers in vaccine rollout, experts say
A new study from SFU suggests prioritizing the vaccination of essential workers would be more effective than the current age-based strategy.
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