A 25-year-old man has been charged in the shooting death of 5-year-old Cannon Hinnant
Police have charged a 25-year-old man with first-degree murder after they say he shot and killed a 5-year-old boy last week in Wilson, North Carolina.
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Activists raise alarm as Ontario passes environmental assessment redesign during pandemic
Bill 197, the COVID-19 Economic Recovery Act, will change dozens of pieces of Ontario legislation.
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Kirk Muller expects Claude Julien to be watching Canadiens on TV
"I wouldn’t be surprised to get a text from him or a phone call between periods," Muller says about coach recovering from heart surgery.
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Kingston lottery winner claims $73K a day before his winning ticket expired: OLG
A Kingston man claimed his OLG prize money a day before his winning ticket was set to expire, waiting almost an entire year to accept $73,000.
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The Weeknd Has Quietly Donated More Than $2 Million To Charities Since June
The Weeknd is famously laconic. He doesn’t talk much. Ever since the Canadian singer materialized on the music scene back in 2010, identity shrouded in the dense haze of anonymity, his energies have been spent on cultivating a distinctive sense of mystery. He’s dark. The music is bruised, melancholic. Fatalistic. You wouldn’t expect a man with an album called “Starboy” to be so averse to the idea of global spotlight, but here we have him, parrying interview requests and only ever tweeting impersonal, career-related dispatches.Instead, Abel Tesfaye prefers to put his money where his mouth is. And he often does. On Wednesday, the singer quietly donated $300,000 to Global Aid in Lebanon, a relief effort committed to supporting the victims of the country’s recent disaster. On Aug. 4, twin explosions tore through the nation’s capital of Beirut, leaving behind $10 to 15 billion USD in property damage, displacing 300,000 from their homes and killing more than 200 others to date. “I am so honoured an humbled to work with artists who have such deep care for the world and right now for our brothers and sisters of Lebanon who are in pain and need our collective help,” The Weeknd’s manager, Wassim “Sal” Slaiby, wrote in a post on Instagram announcing the donation. “I want to thank my brother @theweeknd for his generous and class act of donating $300,000 to the Global Aid for Lebanon campaign.”  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Wassim Slaiby - CEO SAL (@salxo) on Aug 12, 2020 at 12:59pm PDTThe devastating seismic blast in Beirut was loud enough to be registered 241 kilometres away, on the island of Cyprus. A port that was vital for the country’s trade and imports was totally levelled, and hospitals already backed up with COVID-19 patients were left to treat those injured by the blast out on the city streets. “There is an acute shortage of everything,” Hamad Hasan, the country’s health minister, told reporters.The last couple of months have been marked by such donations from The Weeknd, made in relative silence. Since June, the singer, who is estimated to be worth $92 million, has given away around $2.15 million to various social justice organizations — that we know of so far, that is. $100,000 went to National Bail Out, a collective of Black abolitionist organizers working to end mass incarceration. $200,000 went to the Know Your Rights Camp Legal Defense Initiative, to support those who were arrested or fell prey to police brutality while protesting the extrajudicial murders of Black people. $500,000 went to the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund. Another $500,000 to frontline health workers at Scarborough Health Network.When he donated $200,000 to Black Lives Matter, the singer wrote a post on Instagram, asking others to do the same: “Keep supporting our brothers and sisters out there risking everything to push for actual change for our black lives,” he wrote. “Urging everyone with big pockets to give and give big and if you have less please give what you can even if it’s a small amount.   View this post on InstagramA post shared by The Weeknd (@theweeknd) on Jun 1, 2020 at 9:18pm PDTAnd on Aug. 7, The Weeknd held an interactive virtual concert on TikTok, which managed to raise $350,000 for the Equal Justice Initiative through the sale of some limited merchandise.Though his music has always refused to be sweet or spritely, the man himself has often shown his heart over the years, insisting on leveraging his stardom for social justice. In 2016, he donated $250,000 to Black Lives Matter shortly after releasing a statement: “Enough is enough. It’s time to stand up for this. We can either sit and watch, or do something about it. The time is now.”enough is enough. it's time to stand up for this. we can either sit and watch, or do something about it. the time is now. #blacklivesmatter— The Weeknd (@theweeknd) July 7, 2016Earlier that year, he gave $50,000 to the University of Toronto to fund a new class on Ethiopic studies, in the hopes of preserving the Ge’ez language. (Tesfaye is Ethiopian Canadian.) “The Weeknd Is Helping Communities Around The World Flourish,” reads a Global Citizen headline, from 2018.Quiet as he might be, Tesfaye’s actions make a statement when it counts.RELATED Feds To Match Donations From Canadians To Beirut Relief Efforts How You Can Help The People Of Beirut Right Now Lebanese-Canadians Band Together To Help Beirut Following Deadly Explosion Also on HuffPost:
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Alberta Open Farm Days brings urban and rural together during COVID-19
Local farmers are inviting Albertans to get a deeper understanding of resources made in their own province.
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Tropical Storm Josephine remains weak in Atlantic Ocean
The storm had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph) and was located about 680 miles (1,090 kilometres) east-southeast of the northern Leeward Islands, the U.S. National Hurricane Center stated in its 5 a.m. advisory.
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Ryan Reynolds to B.C. partiers spreading COVID: ‘Don’t kill my mom’
Voice message comes after premier’s plea for help from ‘Deadpool’.
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Pense needs votes as it looks to be first Sask. community to win Kraft Hockeyville
Voting has officially begun for Kraft Hockeyville 2020 as Pense, Sask., is in the running to host an NHL preseason game along with $250,000 for arena upgrades.
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Coronavirus: B.C. is trending towards massive growth of new cases in September
    New data presented by the provincial government shows if British Columbia continues its current trend there will be more new cases of COVID-19 than during the virus’s current peak. The province’s modelling shows if British Columbians don’t change their behavior then cases will continue to up through August and into September. The data...
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No injuries reported after vehicle strikes house on Grey Street, severs gas line
London police say no injuries were reported after a car struck a house on Grey Street Friday morning.
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NDP wants ‘full investigation’ into whether WE Charity engaged in improper lobbying
NDP's ethics critic Charlie Angue wrote to the lobbying commissioner on Aug. 10 requesting she investigate WE Charity's communications with government officials.
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Police release shocking video of shooting ambush that killed 45-year-old Scarborough man
Police say they have released the footage in an effort to identify and locate two suspects in the case.
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Nova Scotia reports one new COVID-19 infection, only case active in the province
The province said today the new case was identified Thursday and involves someone in the northern zone.
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Macpherson: What the latest Quebec language report says, and doesn't say
The report on French in the workplace published by Quebec's language-law enforcement agency doesn't actually say what it's reported to say.
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COVIDIOTS: Canadian Edition Strip club compromises almost 600 people!
WATCH ABOVE as we find out the City of Toronto is asking patrons of a local strip club monitor themselves for Covid-19 symptoms after a staffer at the club tested positive for the virus. What do YOU think? Tweet and Facebook us! And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel. 
Toronto Sun
How professors and students across Canada are preparing for a university year like no other
On a recent morning, at just about 9 a.m. Stephen Heard, a professor of biology at the University of New Brunswick, stood in a stream near his Fredericton home, dripping sweat and turning over stones. It was a hot day in the middle of summer, the time of year when Heard, who studies the interaction between plants and insects, would typically be focussing on his own research. But this is not a typical year, to say the least. So instead of working in his own lab, Heard was perched that day between wet rocks, in hiking shoes and cargo shorts, looking for larvae and trying to remember to smile. Like professors and university instructors all over Canada, Heard has spent his summer preparing to teach almost entirely online this fall. Some undergraduate classes at UNB, where Heard runs a research lab and teaches entomology, among other subjects, will be delivered in person this semester. But most of them, including almost every lecture, will be done remotely, via live and recorded video. For Heard and hundreds of his colleagues, though, that hasn’t meant taping old talks, posting them online and heading for the dock. Instead, they’ve been through a breakneck summer of Zoom seminars, new technologies, course overhauls and, in Heard’s case, the creation of time-consuming videos on the in-and-outs of catching larvae. “Nobody,” he said, “should think that this is coming easy.” The 2020 university and college year in Canada, which begins for most schools the Tuesday after Labour Day, will be unlike any other in this country’s history. Students and professors will be undertaking what amounts to a massive, forced experiment in online learning writ-large. Less than a month out, no one is sure how it’s going to go. Some students are outraged they’ll be paying as much, and in some cases more, tuition to study at home as they did last year for face-to-face learning. International students are worried about getting in to the country, quarantines when they get here, or, alternately, studying at home, where they could be 12 time zones away from their professors. Everyone, meanwhile, is stuck wondering what exactly it means to go to university when you can’t go to university. Students aren’t the only ones wondering. Instructors are coming into the fall less refreshed, in many cases, than dazed. Courses that might, in a normal year, have been updated with an afternoon’s tweaking have each had to be fully re-thought for the COVID world. Brenda Fine, who teaches math and statistics at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, said it’s taken her 40 hours, so far, to redo an assessment she normally could have tweaked in four hours tops. For another course, she’s created multiple versions of all her tests to cut down on potential cheating and added a video component where all 130-plus students will have to explain the steps they took to answer one of the questions. On a larger scale, though, Fine is tangibly rethinking how she actually gets her information across. In the normal world, she can literally walk around a class looking at papers to gauge who’s getting it and who isn’t. With online lectures, that isn’t possible. “It’s just so tempting to not be 100 per cent there,” she said. Jamil Jivani: Ontario's old 'streaming' policy ruined the chances of boys like me 'I don’t think anyone should be sending their kids back': Ontario teachers worried about return to school That broad idea, of rethinking the teaching itself, is a challenge for every discipline, including mine. I teach feature writing to third-year university journalism students at Humber College, in Toronto. Like other instructors, I’ve spent parts of my summer taking seminars on online teaching, learning what works and what doesn’t remotely, and really trying to think through how I’ll get concepts across when I can’t sit down with a student and show them how to make their work better. For what I teach, I think those challenges are real, but not insurmountable. In the end, what I’m doing is giving students tools. To get better, they have to go out and use those tools to report and write their own stories, pandemic or no. For Marlis Schweitzer, who chairs the theatre department at York University, it’s a different scale of challenge altogether. There may be no single academic discipline that relies on proximity as much as drama. The theatre is about interaction, physicality and presence, and not just for actors. Drama programs teach students to build sets, hang lights, plan soundscapes. And none of that is possible remotely in the same way it is face-to-face. That doesn’t mean Schweitzer and her colleagues are giving up. They still plan to teach all the same skills this fall they would in a normal year. In fact, they’ve already started. The York theatre department ran a full summer term this year with video acting lessons, movement seminars and vocal coaching. For the fall, they’ve commissioned two new plays specifically written for online performance that the students will stage and put on. “Once we all had a collective ‘ahhhh! What are we all doing?’ we began to work really hard and that work has been continuing throughout the summer,” Schweitzer said. “There’s really been no rest for faculty.” Still, no one expects things to be perfect. Ken Coates, a senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, has spent years looking at the transition students make between high school and university. He is particularly worried about first-year students this fall. “When you put the pieces together, you have, I think, the potential for a really serious calamity,” he said. “This is the least prepared cohort of high school students probably ever. They lost a quarter or a third of their academic year in their grade 12 year. They’ve been off school since March. The high school shift to online learning was extremely uneven…. So it’s been a horrible year for them.” Even in the best of times, Coates said, many students struggle to make the leap into university. Expecting them to do so now, from home, with little or no in-person teaching may be a jump too far. He’s worried many universities will have smaller first year cohorts to begin with, and then, in the first month, when students get a sense of what they’re in for, many will drop classes or drop out altogether. You’re dealing with teenagers who signed up for a social experience, to meet new people, see new places, experience new things, he said. “What they get to do instead is sit downstairs in the basement and look at a computer monitor.” Eesha Kohli graduated from high school in Mississauga this spring. She had planned to move into residence at Queen’s University in Kingston this fall. Instead, she’ll be starting her business degree in September at home, with her family. Kohli didn’t really consider taking a gap year. She can’t travel and there isn’t much relevant work. At the same time, she also didn’t see much point in moving to Kingston, just to be on or near a campus she can’t really attend. “The decision was pretty much instant,” she said. “It just didn’t seem worth it to go and pay money to live somewhere where I’d just be stuck in my room all day when I could be at home.” In terms of the academic side, Kohli said she’s expecting a harder version of the online courses she took in high school. What she’s really worried about missing out on are the extracurriculars — the clubs and societies she could have joined to meet people and grow her network. That’s something that’s been on Kate Korte’s mind all summer. In a normal school year, Korte, the editor in chief of the University of Victoria’s student newspaper, would be spending her first weeks behind a table in the Student Union Building, drumming up volunteers. But this year, with the campus mostly closed, that’s out of the question. Instead, Korte has a one-minute slot in a virtual campus tour to make her pitch. But finding new writers is just one of the problems Korte will face as the editor of a campus newspaper on an empty campus. “The fact that the social aspect of campus life will be nonexistent during these non-in-person semesters, it creates a massive challenge for us,” she said. Some of her staff won’t be in Victoria, while many of the students she covers may not even be in Canada. “I feel like I’m reporting on a town of 20,000 people that’s all over the world and all disconnected,” she said. Bridging that gap may turn out to be hardest thing of all this year. The academic side will come. Online courses are not in and of themselves new. Technology has come a long way. But the social aspects of campus, the clubs and friendships, the life that gets lived, will be harder to recreate. For universities, online learning is very real. Online life has a long way to go. National Post rwarnica@postmedia.com
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‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds responds to Premier Horgan’s call for COVID-19 help
Vancouver born movie-star Ryan Reynolds has a simple message for young people across British Columbia: Don't kill my mom. 
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Victim of deadly stabbing in Manchester Industrial area identified by Calgary police
Officers were called to Macleod Trail and 55 Avenue Southwest just before 3 a.m. for reports of an assault.
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Orillia OPP investigate parking lot altercation after 2 dogs left in car
Shortly before 6 p.m. Wednesday, a couple spotted two dogs in a car at a Front Street North business, officers say.
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Younger students required to wear non-medical masks in Nova Scotia schools
Education Minister Zach Churchill announced today that all students in Grades 4 to 12 will be required to wear a mask while inside school, except when they are seated at desks two metres apart that face the same direction.
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550 Brass Rail strip club patrons exposed to COVID-19
Toronto Public Health is asking hundreds of patrons of a popular Toronto adult entertainment establishment to keep their eyes peeled for COVID-19 symptoms. The advisory, issued by the city Friday morning, says an employee of the Brass Rail Tavern on Yonge St., south of Bloor St., tested positive for COVID-19, potentially exposing nearly 550 people […]
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Toronto Sun
Fredericton-based company launches COVID-19 contact tracing app 2metre
The new app is meant to help businesses manage their customer lines and waiting areas by creating a “virtual” waitlist.
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8 new cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa on Friday
Ottawa Public Health has identified eight new cases of COVID-19 in the city Friday.
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Canada’s own Jordan Romano bringing the heat in Blue Jays bullpen
BUFFALO – Jordan Romano, Canadian-born reliever and early-season sensation on the Blue Jays pitching staff is having a flashback to his youthful days on the other side of the border. He’s at the Tim Horton’s counter near the team’s downtown hotel here in this oddly displaced summer and is savouring a taste from his real […]
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Toronto Sun
Flying wheel crashes into vehicle on Queensway: OPP
OPP say the driver whose vehicle was struck by the wheel was lucky to escape the collision with only minor injuries.
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Coronavirus: Calgary public schools mandate masks for all K-12 students, teachers for fall semester
The Calgary Board of Education and Calgary Catholic School District have mandated face masks for all staff and students for the upcoming school semester.
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MP Michelle Rempel Garner assures she went 'above and beyond' quarantine obligations since return to Canada from U.S.
OTTAWA – Conservative MP Michelle Rempel Garner assured she quarantined for the mandatory 14 days upon returning from the United States, where she was based for a significant part of the COVID-19 pandemic. During the latest meeting of the federal COVID-19 parliamentary committee on Wednesday, many people on social media were surprised to see Rempel Garner sitting in a seat in the House of Commons in Ottawa. That’s because in April, the Toronto Star reported that Rempel Garner was working remotely from Oklahoma, U.S., since the beginning of the pandemic. At the time, she said the travel was due to an “unexpected and urgent private personal matter”. Oklahoma is where her husband and stepchildren live. Since then, there had been no indication that the Conservative MP had returned to Canada … until her appearance in the House. In an interview, Rempel Garner assures that she went “above and beyond” public health guidelines when crossing the border back into Canada, including going into a mandatory 14-day quarantine. “If you think that I would not be in compliance with Canada’s quarantine laws, and that I hadn’t been in contact with public health authorities, you would be mistaken,” the Calgary MP said. She declined to identify where and when she spent her time in quarantine, for “obvious security reasons.” “I went as far as to ensure that we had contacted PHAC (Public Health Agency of Canada) to make sure that we were counting things right. We planned every minute of it out to make sure that I was in extra super compliant, not just for political reasons, but because I set an example” as an MP, she added. According to quarantine laws put in place by the Trudeau government to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, any person arriving in Canada from a foreign country must isolate completely for a minimum of 14 days. Some essential workers, such as MPs, could request an exemption to the rules, but Rempel Garner says she did not. In a statement, her office also confirmed that she arranged for private transport to bring her to her quarantine location upon arriving in Canada, and wore a mask during the transit.  
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No new coronavirus cases confirmed in Simcoe Muskoka Friday, local total remains at 669
The Simcoe Muskoka District Health Unit confirmed no new cases of the novel coronavirus on Friday, with the local case count remaining at 669, including 37 deaths.
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Hundreds of Americans are still trying to enter Canada for shopping, recreation: CBSA
As Canada and the U.S. move to extend the border closure by another month, more than 12,000 Americans have been turned away at our shared border — and almost half of them were coming to Canada to sightsee, shop or have some fun, despite the ongoing pandemic.
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Inmate sent to hospital after assault at Atlantic Institution: officials
Correctional Service Canada said two inmates were injured as a result of the altercation on Wednesday, with one receiving treatment at an outside hospital.
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Contact tracing underway following 3 confirmed cases at Okanagan Correctional Centre
Interior Health says there is no evidence of community transmission, and that it is closely monitoring the situation.
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Rethinking the theme park in the age of social distancing
Experts say pandemic will likely lead to increased focus on interactive, play-based experience.
2 h
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Ontario increasing room capacity limits at gyms, fitness, recreation facilities
Starting Saturday, August 15 at 12:01 a.m., these facilities can have up to 50 people for each indoor sport or fitness room, while ensuring physical distancing of at least two metres.
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Stu Cowan: Does it really matter now that Kirk Muller isn't French?
The timing of Canadiens GM Marc Bergevin's apology seemed bizarre and out of place while Claude Julien was about to have heart surgery.
2 h
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Montreal’s Notre Dame Basilica faces funding crunch as COVID-19 curbs tourism
One of Canada's best-known religious landmarks, the Notre-Dame Basilica in Montreal, is seeking urgent government assistance to withstand a budget shortfall caused by COVID-19.
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'No question' of involving Quebec in liquefied natural gas project, Legault says
The premier's comments probably drew a sigh of relief from Québec solidaire, which has called for the project to be scrapped.
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