Frost expected in Barrie, Midland, Orillia areas: Environment Canada
The federal weather agency says frost may destroy crops and other plants and advises growers to cover them up in frost-prone areas.
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28-year-old facing sexual assault charges in Halifax
Halifax police say a man who sexually assaulted a woman who he knew was arrested on Sept. 9.
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Dubé to Quebecers: Please answer when public health department calls
"About 25 to 30 per cent of people just don't answer their phones."
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Strict limits on private gatherings requested as coronavirus cases rise in London, Ont.
The health unit is requesting that COVID-19 gathering restrictions announced by the province for Toronto, Peel Region, and Ottawa be extended locally.
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Ontario nurses’ college hit by ransomware attack, personal data at risk
The College of Nurses of Ontario, which oversees about 188,000 members, offered few details about what it had previously referred to only as a "cybersecurity incident" it discovered Sept. 8.
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Plan calls for $16.2-million Sam Lawrence Park makeover
Ward 8 Coun. John-Paul Danko says the 'signature' piece will be a pedestrian bridge over the Jolley Cut.
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London, Middlesex County under frost advisory as overnight low set to hit zero
On average, the first frost in London usually arrives in the first week of October, but an Environment Canada advisory has already been issued.
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Cold case chronicles: A Quebec brother's decades-long quest to solve his sister's murder
Theresa Allore went missing when she was 19 years old, on Nov. 3, 1978. Her body was found the following April in a river about one kilometre from Compton, Que., where she was living in an off-campus residence while attending Champlain College in Lennoxville. Four decades later, her case remains unsolved, although the Sûreté du Québec, the provincial police force, was quick to come up with a theory at the time. Allore’s family were told that the straight-A student had likely died of a drug overdose, and was dumped at the Coaticook River by panicked friends. This despite the fact the coroner found no trace of drugs in Allore’s system and she was discovered wearing only her bra and underwear. Theresa’s death forever altered the Allore family, which was left wondering if they really knew the vivacious teen who police claimed was caught up in ’70s drug culture. Theresa’s father hired a private investigator and years later her elder brother picked up the case, but they never found any evidence to challenge the police theory, which they ultimately accepted. The youngest of three children, John Allore  was 14 years old when his sister died. He was the last one to pick up the case, more than two decades after Theresa’s death. Even as some members of his family tell him it’s time to drop his investigation and move on, John says, he’s still “all in.” At first, he needed to know  why none of her friends had ever come forward, wracked with guilt, to tell the story of what happened to her that tragic night. In 2001, he reached out to journalist  Patricia Pearson, his high school sweetheart, who, at the time, was a National Post columnist. He urged her to write something that would encourage Theresa’s friends to finally break their silence. Instead, Pearson and John embarked on a five-month investigation that resulted in a three-part series published in the Post in August 2002. By the end, not only were they convinced Theresa had been murdered, they had determined the perpetrator was likely a serial killer and even identified two potential suspects. John says he had high hopes that after the report was published, someone in the police department would come forward to be a champion for Theresa and solve her case. But this “super cop” never arrived. Instead, John became the investigator, scouring other cases for potential leads, and even launching a cold case podcast — Who Killed Theresa — in 2017. In Wish You Were Here: A Murdered Girl, a Brother’s Quest and the Hunt for a Serial Killer, a new book published Sept. 22, Pearson and John have teamed up again to chronicle the ongoing hunt for Theresa’s killer and the connections they’ve made to other unsolved murders. They also take a critical look at the police culture in Quebec that enabled investigators to write off a likely rape and murder victim as a drug overdose. The National Post’s Aileen Donnelly spoke with John, who lives in Durham, North Carolina, and Pearson, who is based in Toronto, about their new book. Q This book covers a lot of ground. It not only chronicles the Allore family’s decades-long search for answers, but examines that in the context of the history of policing in Quebec and unsolved murder across Canada. Is there one thing you hope people take away from reading it? ALLORE: All of it. That was very deliberate. We wanted somebody from Quebec to get something out of it, and somebody from the rest of Canada to maybe get something different out of it. There was a way to write this book that was straight biography — we’d start with Theresa’s birth.  PEARSON: For me, what was really important was focusing on giving voice to some of these women and their families, and really exploring the trauma of being gaslit. You have a family member die, that’s a trauma; it is unsolved, that’s traumatizing; and then, on top of that, you’re treated like you’re a nuisance or you’re treated like there’s no dignity to the victim because they were a sex worker. And I don’t think people fully understand why it’s so injurious to a family to be treated that way by the police. And for me, I was in a unique position where I had seen this going for years, and my own journey was one of, essentially, misunderstanding and indifference as a teenager with John, to coming to a place, as a woman and a mother, where I finally really understood how profound this injury can be.  Q You make quite a few references to how police are portrayed in pop culture. How do you think this influenced how the Allore family interacted with officers from the Sûreté du Québec? PEARSON: We have this idea about police officers, filtered through media, that makes us feel that somehow they are more nuanced thinkers than a lot of them are, or that they are more caring. They are more like father figures. (The police) wrote off Theresa’s death as a drug overdose, and we lived with that understanding. So it wasn’t a cold case, in that sense, for a long time. It was actually written off as a drug overdose. And there was no way to question the authority of the police on that. You just assumed that if they thought that, they had reasons to think that. The fact that they were just making it up off the top of their heads because they couldn’t be bothered to investigate didn’t even dawn on us, you know? And a very similar thing happened out west with the (Robert) Pickton case. And then we also looked at it from the point of view of Calgary — those cold cases that we were looking at, same thing. I think we’re undergoing a kind of reckoning right now about how fallible policing actually is. And then starting to think about what we do about that. How do we retrain? How do we take that authority and reassemble it in a way that has integrity? ALLORE: A lot of, of what is in the book is deliberately poised to suggest, we aren’t just talking about the ’70s here. Q Was the process of writing this book cathartic, John? ALLORE: When we started, your first inclination is good, fantastic. This is going to be published, you know, what could be better than that? And that was immediately followed with, like, oh s—t, I’ve got to retell this and relive this all again. I felt I had told this story many times and that somehow Patricia would just sort of infiltrate my head. And then you realize that that was not going to happen. And that you were going to have to be opened up like an oyster again. And I think that’s why I was grateful that Patricia came along. I was not emotionally prepared to go there. I didn’t have the artistry as well. Particularly with the interviews.  Q Do you feel like you have closure after writing the book? ALLORE: It’s not my favourite word. I understand why it’s used, because it’s sort of universally understood. But I think closure’s become overused. I think the best thing I read recently on grief was actually from Meryl Streep. She was talking about the grieving process when her partner, John Cazale, died. And her words were something like, “I didn’t want to forget. You need to assimilate the grief so that it becomes part of you. Otherwise, you will obsess over it and it will take over your life.” And for me, that was the best expression of what I felt I had done — to overcome it, to turn it into an action, into a doing, rather than just sitting there moping. (Theresa’s) here right now, and I don’t mean in a spiritual way. It’s a dialogue that is going on. So I don’t really grieve my sister. And as far as something being closed, I don’t think it’s closed. I think it’s just assimilated into my being. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity and length. National Post
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PM Trudeau announces two Toronto-area byelections to be held Oct. 26
Ontario voters in two electoral ridings will head to the polls on Oct. 26, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has officially called the byelections for Toronto Centre and York Centre.
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Can Canada’s universities survive COVID?
Fewer international students, half-full residences, shuttered food services and empty parking lots add up to devastating revenue losses. And public funding has fallen over the past decade. Universities are in for a reckoning. The post Can Canada’s universities survive COVID? appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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13 new coronavirus cases, 1 new death reported in Simcoe Muskoka as local total surpasses 800
Amid the region's uptick in coronavirus cases, public health is recommending that people restrict their social circles to household members only.
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2 teens dead, 1 in hospital after Highway 21 crash near Fort Saskatchewan
Two teenagers from Sherwood Park are dead and one from Fort Saskatchewan is in hospital after a collision on Highway 21 Thursday night.
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Shanah Tovah U'metukah: Celebrate Rosh Hashanah safely
With students going back to school and COVID-19 restrictions on gatherings still in place, many families and synagogues, hesitant about gathering as usual, are finding other ways to celebrate safely.
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Walmart Canada is getting rid of price-matching program
Walmart Canada is discontinuing its ad-matching program throughout the country in less than a month.
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Prime Minister Trudeau calls byelections for Toronto Centre, York Centre on Oct. 26
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has called a byelection for two ridings in Toronto, Toronto Centre and York Centre, which will take place on Oct. 26.
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Families cope with rocky school start when sniffles could mean COVID-19 tests, self-isolation
The start of school is typically a stressful time for families, but none more so than this year as families try to adjust to a new reality in which even the slightest sniffle or minor headache could mean COVID-19 tests, days of isolation, and interruptions to education and work.
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Missing teen from Mitchell, Man., believed to be in Winnipeg: RCMP
In a release Friday, Steinbach RCMP said the missing teen has made intermittent contact with her family and was last heard from Sept. 13.
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Manitoba’s minimum wage rises to $11.90 an hour Oct. 1
On Oct. 1, the province said, the minimum wage will increase by 25 cents, rising to $11.90 an hour from $11.65.
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Coronavirus: Niagara Region extends mandatory mask bylaw
At a council meeting on Thursday night, the existing face-covering legislation to combat COVID-19 was extended for six months.
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Services expanded at Winnipeg libraries after months of pandemic restrictions
The Winnipeg Public Library said the expansion of services at all branches across the city will include collection browsing, limited computer use, self-pick-up of holds, and printing and photocopying.
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Hamilton’s Spencer Gorge reopens to visitors, by reservation only
Parking fines for violators are $250 within what the City of Hamilton has deemed a special enforcement area.
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Ottawa is in a second wave of COVID-19: Dr. Vera Etches
Ottawa added 61 coronavirus cases on Friday as the city's top doctor confirmed the nation's capital is facing a second wave of the virus.
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Singh not interested in forcing election but wants more help for Canadians
Singh's comments Friday were his clearest yet on whether the NDP plans to support the minority Liberal government's throne speech next week.
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Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet Tests Positive For COVID-19
Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet has tested positive for COVID-19. Blanchet plans to isolate at his home in Shawinigan until Sept. 26 but feels “perfectly fine,” according to a statement from the party Friday.Quebec’s public health rules say a person who tests positive but doesn’t have serious symptoms must stay isolated for 10 days.The Bloc leader and the 31 MPs in his caucus were already in isolation as a precaution after a staff member tested positive Monday, less than a week after an in-person caucus meeting. Blanchet’s wife, Nancy Deziel, announced Tuesday that she, too, had tested positive for COVID-19.In the statement, Blanchet stressed the importance of keeping up physical distancing measures, wearing masks, and washing one’s hands to slow the spread of the virus.The revelation means Blanchet, leader of the third party in the House of Commons, will not be physically present for next week’s throne speech and the return of Parliament. The government’s much-anticipated speech from the throne will be delivered Sept. 23.Last month, Blanchet made headlines when he said he would move a motion of non-confidence and try to trigger a fall election if he did not see resignations from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his chief of staff, and his then-finance minister Bill Morneau, mostly over the WE Charity controversy. Morneau stepped down less than a week after Blanchet’s public ultimatum.Blanchet suggested at the time that he wasn’t concerned about optics and safety issues involved in potentially forcing another campaign during the pandemic.“Which is more dangerous? A mismanagement of a crisis or taking the time to change the people who are managing the crisis?” he said. Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole also went into isolation with his family Wednesday after a staffer with whom he had recently travelled tested positive for the virus.“My family and I are feeling well, but we take COVID-19 very seriously,” O’Toole said in a statement, adding the “health and safety of my family and all Canadians is my top priority.”O’Toole said Thursday that he was tested in Gatineau, Que., after being “turned away” from an assessment centre in the Ottawa Public Health Unit a day earlier because the centre had reached capacity. He said his family had waited in line for hours.Though provinces are responsible for testing, the experience spurred O’Toole to blast Liberals for not having approved rapid testing methods being used in other countries, including the United States. “I stand with the thousands of Canadian families who are waiting in lines today for tests. It has been seven months, Justin Trudeau must answer for why we do not have access to more of the tests our allies are using,” he said.Health Minister Patty Hajdu said this week that while Health Canada is reviewing rapid testing devices, it won’t approve any of them until it is confident results will be accurate. “We have not had a test submitted to Health Canada for approval yet that satisfies the regulator’s concerns around accuracy,” she said.Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the wife of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, tested positive for COVID-19 in March after returning from the U.K. with a low fever and flu-like symptoms. Her diagnosis prompted Trudeau to isolate at home for 14 days.Grégoire Trudeau made a full recovery weeks later. “From the bottom of my heart, I want to say thank you to everyone who reached out to me with their well wishes. And to everyone who is suffering right now, I send you all my love,” she said in a statement at the time.“I strongly believe that science AND compassion will get us through this crisis.”With a file from The Canadian Press
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$1B supply bill passed in N.L. falls short of Liberal government’s wishes
Liberal government had originally proposed a bill that would let the government keep spending despite not having passed a budget.
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1 dead after 3-vehicle crash on Highway 401 in Pickering
A police spokesperson told Global News a stalled vehicle was hit by other vehicles, causing one of them to catch fire. 
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Second man charged in death of Anthony Charles Johnson in west end Halifax
Johnson was found with a gunshot wound on Jan. 26 around 11:30 p.m. in the area of Connaught and Chisholm avenues in Halifax.
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Air quality expected to deteriorate in Alberta this weekend due to wildfire smoke
It’s predicted air quality in Alberta will worsen this weekend as smoke from wildfires in B.C. and the western U.S. continues to settle over the province.
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Coronavirus: Outbreak declared at sports and fitness facility in Waterloo Region
Waterloo Public Health has declared an outbreak at a sports and fitness facility within the region, saying three cases of COVID-19 have been identified.
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Design of post-CERB benefits could change as pandemic shifts course, minister says
The federal minister overseeing key aid programs for workers during the pandemic says there could still be changes to a proposed package of income-support benefits as the country faces renewed pressure from COVID-19.
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U.S.-Canada Border Closure Extended Until Oct. 21
OTTAWA — Public Safety Minister Bill Blair says the partial closure of the Canadian border with the United States is being extended another month to Oct. 21.Crossings of the U.S.-Canada border have been largely restricted to trade goods, essential workers and citizens returning home since March, in an attempt to limit the spread of COVID-19.Blair and his American counterpart, acting U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf, each tweeted the latest one-month extension of the closure agreement on Friday morning.We are extending non-essential travel restrictions with the United States until October 21st, 2020. We will continue to base our decisions on the best public health advice available to keep Canadians safe.— Bill Blair (@BillBlair) September 18, 2020We continue to work with our Canadian and Mexican partners to slow the spread of #COVID19. Accordingly, we have agreed to extend the limitation of non-essential travel at our shared land ports of entry through October 21.— Acting Secretary Chad Wolf (@DHS_Wolf) September 18, 2020The pandemic has raged in the U.S. throughout the spring and summer, and cases in Canada have recently started rising again, as well.At the same time, leaders in border communities have asked federal authorities to loosen restrictions slightly to allow people with links on both sides to live more normally.On Friday, the Conservatives also called for Blair to allow more compassionate exemptions to the closure, such as for people who are engaged to be married or where loved ones are seriously ill.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 18, 2020.READ MORE Trump Blames Biden For Not Making Masks Mandatory Across The U.S. Doug Ford Appeals To Feds To Fix 'Broken' Quarantine System Trump Administration Drops 'Goofy' Tariff On Canadian Aluminium Also on HuffPost:
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Case of Corey Hurren, who faces 22 charges in Rideau Hall incident, delayed until October
Corey Hurren is accused of ramming his truck through a gate at the Governor General's official residence on July 2.
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Catholic board reports COVID-19 case at elementary school in Niagara Falls
The school board's director says students and staff were exposed.
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Giannis Antetokounmpo wins second straight NBA MVP award, source says
A source says the 25-year-old Milwaukee forward is the NBA’s Most Valuable Player for the second consecutive season.
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Queen Elizabeth strips Harvey Weinstein of honorary title
Disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein is currently serving a 23-year prison term for multiple charges, including sexual assault and rape.
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Your job and COVID-19: Is it time to cut the work week to boost productivity?
Banks Benitez had great plans for his staff for 2020: a four-day week on full pay. Then the pandemic struck. The lockdown and economic downturn caused the chief executive and co-founder of Uncharted, a Denver-based accelerator helping start-ups aiming to solve social and community problems, to doubt whether the four-day plan would work. “The question became, is this the best time to do it? Or is it the worst time to do it? We had lost some funding and revenue and things were tight. We had to lay off a few people in early April.” It seemed logical to encourage workers to put in more rather than fewer hours. Yet after a few weeks of remote working, Mr Benitez saw employees were overloaded from video calls and juggling work with home schooling. “We decided [it] was not the worst time but actually the best time [to go to four days].” So in June, to boost productivity, he cut his 13 employees’ working week. Coronavirus has disrupted working life across the world. Many white-collar workers discovered they did not have to go to the office every day to continue to do their jobs. Yet it was not just where work was done that changed but also when, prompting some businesses to re-evaluate conventional nine-to-five (if you were lucky), five-day working patterns. Those who have had to work around childcare or other caring responsibilities have demonstrated that as long as the work is done, it may not matter when it takes place. A study of 3.1m remote workers in North America, Europe and the Middle East during the pandemic by the US National Bureau of Economic Research found that employees’ working days increased, and they attended more — although shorter — meetings. The report concludes, however, that it was “unclear if this increase in average workday span represents a benefit or drawback to employee wellbeing”. The data did not show whether workers were choosing to work around their family, or if the increased hours were “overwork due to the lack of clear delineation between the office and home”. There were also gender differences in the way working time was protected. According to research by the UK’s Institute for Fiscal Studies, during lockdown mothers’ work was more likely to be interrupted. “Mothers combine paid work with other activities (almost always childcare) in 47 per cent of their work hours, compared with 30 per cent of fathers’ work hours”, the IFS found. Gemma Dale, a human resources consultant and lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University, says that when it comes to debates about work in the Covid era and beyond, there has been too much focus on where work is done, rather than on the hours worked. “People are using this [period] as an opportunity of reflection. It is showing up in the desire to live differently,” she says. Executives have reappraised the necessity of commuting and business travel, for example. Though she acknowledges it is impossible to generalise about how reflective workers could be. “People’s experiences have been very different from being burnt out to baking banana bread,” she says. For those adults who did enjoy aspects of the restrictions to their lifestyle imposed by Covid-19, the Office for National Statistics found that many liked the slower pace. Almost nine in 10 (86 per cent) of adults who reported that they were enjoying spending more quality time with the people they live with wanted to continue doing so after the pandemic was over. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, author of Shorter, which lays out the case for boosting productivity through a shorter working week, says that working from home has also made employees think about how much time had been spent on “supporting activities” such as commuting and personal grooming. As offices open up, organisations may need to stagger start times. This could allow them to take in employees’ scheduling preferences, say researchers, including the times of day they are most productive, as well as helping to avoid overcrowding at work and on public transport. The key is consultation and predictability — lacking control over hours can harm employees’ wellbeing. Full pay for reduced hours? Against the backdrop of widespread job losses, employees will hardly feel able to dictate their working conditions. And shorter working hours on full pay will not be front of mind for employers struggling to keep their companies afloat. Heejung Chung, reader in sociology and social policy at the UK’s University of Kent, says: “What you will probably see more in companies is [they] get people to go on four-day week contracts to save costs. What happens to mothers all the time is the work doesn’t decrease, just the pay.” Many — particularly those on lower incomes — who have had their pay cut will want more hours rather than fewer. Campaigners for shorter working weeks argue that the four-day week could be a way of redistributing work. A recent proposal by Autonomy, a UK think-tank focused on the future of work, made a case for a shorter working time subsidy scheme to prevent lay-offs, reallocate hours and retain jobs as the German Kurzarbeit scheme does. Will Stronge, Autonomy’s director of research, recognises that most businesses’ priority is survival. Nonetheless, he says, this downturn is different to previous ones. “The financial crisis [of 2008 resulted in] job losses. It didn’t disrupt the way people were working. At the same time, there’s been a swell of new policy and thinking around the future of work, around automation and welfare.” In May, New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, raised the prospect of four-day weeks to boost leisure and travel industries. Whatever the rationale, reducing hours needs careful planning. In May, Uncharted’s staff were given a month’s notice to prepare to reduce their working week by clarifying goals and streamlining work. “It was really figuring out what we say ‘no’ to,” says Mr Benitez. All employees were asked to be available on Mondays to Thursdays between 10am and 3pm for meetings and collaboration but otherwise they could arrange their time themselves. While Fridays are the company-wide day off, Mr Benitez wants to ensure flexibility, for example, a parent working five short days to fit with school hours. After monitoring progress through an independent evaluation, he is convinced of the benefits of the four-day week. On average, the working week reduced 23 per cent from 45 hours. Some employees were concerned that by making every hour count, there was less room for fun, although that could also be a result of remote working during a pandemic. Plans for a four-day week had already been under way before the pandemic at 3D Issue, a software company based in Donegal, Ireland. But Paul McNulty, founder and chief executive, says the crisis has sharpened his resolve to cut hours as a way of attracting new talent in a competitive local market. When the working week was cut, he saw “greater happiness among employees. Some of them talk about having a day to themselves when kids go back to school. They are more refreshed and engaged.” For David Cann, managing director of Target Publishing, it was coronavirus-induced financial difficulties that pushed him to make difficult decisions. “To get us through this we needed to take a 20 per cent pay cut to ride the wave. I didn’t feel quite comfortable. For people on a lower wage it felt like a big ask.” So he cut hours too, giving everyone Fridays off. “The team started to work well together. We produced the same amount of magazines.” He says his 20-strong workforce are not working compressed hours but rather that they are more efficient — remote working had shown Mr Cann that meetings could be streamlined. “It’s early days but it feels right. What that’s achieved is thinking you shouldn’t be scared of change. Covid makes you think differently — I probably wouldn’t have done this unless it was forced on us.”
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Peterborough family dispute leads to assault charges: police
Peterborough police say two people were taken to hospital following a family dispute that turned violent.
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Wasaga Beach resident charged after interfering while firefighters respond to blaze: police
Police say a man released a dog that he said was trained to attack.
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Bill Zacharkiw's Wines of the Week: Sept. 18, 2020
A pinot noir that's worth the extra five cents, a big red to finish off the barbecue season, an expressive verdicchio and a Champagne that justifies the cost.
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New ‘Toronto’ sign unveiled at Nathan Phillips Square
'This new and more durable Toronto sign will ensure that it continues to be part of our city’s landscape for years to come,' Mayor John Tory said.
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This French movie changed my style for good
I’ve got my wardrobe sorted for the next 10 years
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OPP seize 235 cannabis plants in Caledon, Ont.
Police say that a Cannabis Act warrant was executed on Wednesday and that officers seized 235 cannabis plants that were about five to seven feet in height.
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Bloc Québécois leader Yves-François Blanchet tests positive for COVID-19
Blanchet was already in self-isolation after a staff member contracted the illness.
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Doug Ford makes an announcement ahead of the Throne Speech: Live video
Ontario's premier will be joined by Québec Premier François Legault, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney The post Doug Ford makes an announcement ahead of the Throne Speech: Live video appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Toronto eyes additional measures after ‘troubling’ jump in new COVID-19 cases
Mayor John Tory said he’s concerned that venues like banquet halls are exempt from new gathering limits after weddings have led to several new infections in Toronto.
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New Brunswick reports no new COVID-19 cases on Friday
One case remains active in the province.
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