16-year-old Toronto diver cleans up water at Humber Bay Park on weekends
To date, Mark Turezki and his father have completed more than 20 dives at one site.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
VPD surveillance trailer deployed to combat increase in property crime in downtown Vancouver
There was a 268 per cent increase in violent shoplifting incidents in the downtown core last year, according to the VPD.
Vancouver News, Top Stories, Breaking...
'Terrible judgment': Vancouver police fine host of gender reveal party for breaking COVID-19 rules
Police say they have issued a $2,300 fine to the host of a gender reveal party in downtown Vancouver for violating the provincial health order banning gatherings.
CTV News | Top Stories - Breaking News -...
Teen charged in Centennial neighbourhood stabbing
Police took a youth into custody on Feb. 26 after officers responded to a report of a man stabbed in a business.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Leafs might face Oilers without Auston Matthews, Frederik Andersen and Jack Campbell
“Whether it’s goaltending or Auston up front … we’ve got a lot question marks that probably won’t get answered until game time,” coach Sheldon Keefe said on the club’s injury status after Sunday’s practice in Edmonton.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
U.S. expects first shipments of Johnson and Johnson vaccine to be delivered Tuesday
Initial deliveries of the newly approved Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine should start on Tuesday, helping to boost vaccination rates across the country, senior administration officials said on Sunday.
CTV News | Top Stories - Breaking News -...
Rent hike could force Mile End's S. W. Welch bookstore to close
There's a David versus Goliath battle going in the heart of Mile End, and it looks like Goliath has the upper hand in this all-too-familiar tale of gentrification in a hot hip neighbourhood.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Inuit Midwives Say They Quit Birthing Centre After Years Of Mistreatment
IQALUIT, Nunavut — Cas Augaarjuk Connelly and Rachel Qiliqti Kaludjak never wanted to stop working at a Nunavut birthing centre, but they say years of mistreatment, racism and a lack of support from their government left them no choice.Both are nationally certified midwives, the first Inuit in Canada to hold such credentials, and for the last six years were the only ones to offer labour support full time in Rankin Inlet.“It was our dream and our passion. I really had visions of retiring from the birthing centre when I’m old and grey,” Kaludjak said.In January 2020, Connelly resigned and Kaludjak left in August. Connelly had worked at the centre since 2008; Kaludjak since 2003.The Nunavut government then shuttered birthing services in Rankin Inlet, forcing expectant mothers there and in surrounding hamlets to leave home to give birth.“It was a very emotional decision. We felt like we were failing ourselves and failing our fellow Inuit women. That made me very, very sad,” Kaludjak said. “And I felt very guilty about that. And I still do. The system doesn’t allow for us to succeed.“The women deserve an explanation. A real concrete one.”Centre opened in 1993When Connelly and Kaludjak started at the birthing centre, which opened in 1993, there were two other full-time midwives. But for the last six years, they were the only two. The remaining positions were filled by a revolving door of southern midwives who would fly up for a few weeks.Connelly and Kaludjak were essentially running the centre on their own.“We were constantly orienting new staff. And often we had no casuals. We’d have blocks of time where we didn’t have enough staff. We’d be on call for weeks and weeks at a time,” Connelly said.Nunavut’s health-care system relies heavily on southern providers. And the most recent figures from Statistics Canada show that the territory has the highest birthrate in Canada at 22.6 live births per 1,000 people — more than double the national average of 10.1. Some 840 babies were born to Nunavut mothers in 2019.Connelly and Kaludjak provided Nunavut Inuit with something rare: health care at home in their first language.“Women were able to speak their own language. It was so rewarding,” Kaludjak said.“We’re related to half the community, so you’re taking care of your family as well,” Connelly added.At times, she said, they were burned out, worried for their patients and felt like they had all of the community’s maternity care on their shoulders.Yet when Department of Health staff needed information or had questions about the birthing centre, they turned to the southern, non-Inuit staff, the women said.“In their eyes, there were the Aboriginal midwives and then the midwives. We’d do births together and we’d be supervised by people who don’t even do births. We were always made to feel less,” Connelly said.“We were questioned on things like overtime and mirroring our southern colleagues, who were there at the exact same time doing a birth together. Our southern colleagues were never questioned,” Kaludjak said.Brushed asideOne Nunavut government employee, who wished to remain anonymous, said the two women were constantly brushed aside by management.“You would have somebody from the south come up, who’s literally been there a week, and the manager wanted to meet with that person ... instead of asking Inuit that have been there for a decade,” she said.Kaludjak was acting manager at the birthing centre for three years. She said when the position was posted, she interviewed for the job and was rejected.She said she was told she would need to train her replacement, but no one was hired.Joan Margaret Laine, a midwife who worked with the two women, said the government failed them.“There were so many instances of racism and aggression. It was really disheartening to work there.”She said she was in a group of midwives who offered to work full time in Rankin Inlet to give Connelly and Kaludjak some relief. But jobs were never posted. The whole dream that the government has of homegrown professionals, I don’t know how that’s ever going to be if they don’t support it.Rachel Qiliqti Kaludjak, midwifeThe Department of Health did not respond to requests for comment about the jobs or Connelly and Kaludjak.Health Minister Lorne Kusugak, who was moved into the role after Connelly and Kaludjak left, said he’s working with his department to review the birthing centre’s operations.“Since Day 1 of my first meeting with senior staff, that was one of the top priorities that we brought forward, to ensure the centre runs again and we don’t run into the same issues that may have been highlighted by previous staff.”Kusuagak said he is “very aware” of the situation at the centre.“We have to make sure that the work environment is one that is equal to everybody that is there. The goal here is to have women give birth in a very safe and peaceful environment.”‘Anti-Inuit racism’Martha Aitkin, the birthing centre’s director from 2006 to 2009, also worked as a locum midwife in Rankin Inlet in 2017. She said Connelly and Kaludjak experienced “a long list of microaggressions” by the government.“It can only be described as anti-Inuit racism. The view from the southern people above them in the government hierarchy was that they weren’t good enough, that they weren’t as qualified,” said Aitkin, who is from Ontario.Connelly, Kaludjak and other midwives said they brought their issues to the government over the years, but nothing was done. They said that’s partially because there is a high turnover in departmental staff.“I don’t think there’s anyone in one position long enough to make change,” Connelly said.“The whole dream that the government has of homegrown professionals, I don’t know how that’s ever going to be if they don’t support it,” Kaludjak said.The territory’s Arctic College ran a midwifery program from 2006 to 2014, but it never continued.Fiona Buchan-Corey, director of the college’s Kitikmeot campus, said federal government funding was not renewed.Kerstin Gafvels helped develop the program and worked with Connelly and Kaludjakt. She said she was disappointed when she heard the program was no longer running and that Connelly and Kaludjak had left the birthing centre.“No one coming in temporarily from the south would ever understand or have the knowledge that they carry by being part of the community, of actually living there.”Connelly and Kaludjak still live in Rankin Inlet with their families.“The government leaves people hanging with no explanation and too many empty promises and I don’t want to be a part of that,” Connelly said.“This is not just a government-bashing discussion. It’s mainly for the women to have answers and for the government to step up and make the necessary changes.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 28, 2021.This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian Press News Fellowship.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDWhy Modern Indigenous Parents Are Turning To Traditional Pregnancy PracticesCluster Of WWI Trench Fever Disease Highlights Extreme Poverty In WinnipegOntario's Vaccine Rollout Should Prioritize Both Neighbourhood And Age: Experts'Who Is A Health-Care Worker?': The Big Question We Must Ask In Vaccine Planning
1 h
Huffington Post Canada - Canadian News...
The Maple Leafs are building an energy line for fuel, now and in the playoffs
Pierre Engvall, Ilya Mikheyev and Zach Hyman led the team in several key metrics in Saturday’s win over the Oilers. They might not stay together all season, but they showed what can be done.
1 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Man arrested after fire destroys home in Bécancour
A link between the suspect and the house was was undetermined as of Sunday.
1 h
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Alberta physicians continue to warn against further reopening as active COVID-19 cases rise Sunday
Some physicians in the province say they are concerned about a potentially premature approval of the Stage 2 reopening plan.
1 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
‘We crushed the goal’: Orangeville food bank gets big boost from Coldest Night of the Year
1 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Dufferin-Caledon Greens, Conservatives file petition against waste water treatment plant
2 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Swastikas, racist graffiti spray-painted on trees in Vancouver’s Riverview Park
"The City of Vancouver and Park Board condemn the abhorrent acts of racism in the strongest possible terms," the park board said in a statement.
2 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Kamloops man captures dynamic video of lynx hunting birds in local park
Darren Crowell said he was walking at McArthur Island Park in Kamloops when he spotted the lynx.
2 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Investment in social housing demanded for victims of domestic violence
Alliance MH2 says the province is currently dealing with a dangerous shortage of resources in its second-stage housing — where women and children go once they leave emergency shelters, but before they find permanent housing.
2 h
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Trump declares himself ‘future’ of the Republican party in CPAC speech
Trump fervor at the four-day event has been so strong that Trump's son Donald Trump Jr. declared it "T-PAC" and participants rolled out a golden statue of the former president.
2 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Vancouver gender reveal party host fined $2,300 for breaking COVID-19 restrictions
Police shut the party down and issued a ticket to the host under the COVID Related Measures Act.
2 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
A Quick Reminder That The Golden Globes Are A Scam
In normal, non-plague years, the Golden Globes are a fun awards show to watch. They honour movies and TV, so there are a lot of good categories and relatively little filler. (Sorry, sound-mixing enthusiasts.)Unlike the Oscars or the Emmys, the awards typically happen over dinner. That means the celebrities are drinking throughout, and often get looser and more fun towards the end of the night. Take, for instance, Emma Thompson presenting a screenplay award barefoot with a martini in her hand, tossing her heels behind her, or Brendan Fraser’s now-iconic full-body laugh at a since-forgotten joke about Martin Scorsese.For all these reasons, the awards ceremony is an entertaining watch. It’s a show we’ll be tuning in to (or at the very least, watching the highlights from). But it’s important to remember that the awards themselves, for all intents and purposes, are a total scam.The Golden Globes are voted on and presented by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Who is that, exactly? Their names aren’t publicly available, but according to their website, it’s a non-profit group made up of 87 international journalists based in Southern California. Sounds prestigious, right?Some of them do work for well-respected overseas outlets. But according to the LA Times, many members of the HFPA work at obscure or unknown publications. And many of them are rich people with very little journalistic experience or output: the newspaper identified one member as Yola Czaderska-Hayek, a socialite, party host and writer who calls herself “the First Polish Lady of Hollywood.” Another is Alexander Nevsky, a Russian bodybuilder who segued into producing and has had bit roles in several action movies.I think I'm the only producer who can lift 100 pound dumbbells and the only bodybuilder who votes for @goldenglobes and produces films..
2 h
Huffington Post Canada - Canadian News...
Gregor Chisholm: Teoscar Hernandez doesn’t want to be a DH. The Blue Jays should pay attention after the best stretch of his career
After waiting several years for Hernandez to develop, the last thing this organization should be doing is messing with the outfielder’s routine just a few months removed from a Silver Slugger performance, Gregor Chisholm writes.
2 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Will Ontario’s summer camps be allowed to open? Here’s how they're trying to make it happen
The odds are looking better for overnight camps to resume operations in Ontario this summer, but there are no guarantees as more contagious variants of COVID-19 remain a wild card.
2 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...