‘He can do what he wants’: Higgs, New Brunswick Tories are in control after snap election

"Because of this antiquated first-past-the-post system, we reward those who get less than 40 per cent of the vote with a majority... It's absurd."
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Alberta RCMP arrest 2nd person in Sturgeon Lake shooting; 2 suspects still at large
Police arrested Albert John Gladue on Sept. 18 on the attempted murder warrant and are still looking for Colin Aulden Bartlett and Tamara Marie Chowace.
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Total of 70 beached whales rescued off Australia coast, but hundreds more lost
Another 20 surviving whales could potentially still be saved on Thursday and vets were considering euthanizing another four, officials said.
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Haldimand police services board urges OPP to enforce injunction at Caledonia development
The police services board for Haldimand County says the OPP framework for responding to 'Indigenous critical incidents' isn't working in Caledonia amid the occupation of a construction site.
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Steven Stamkos returns, Lightning beat Stars 5-2 in Game 3 of Stanley Cup Final
Tampa Bay captain Steven Stamkos returned -- very briefly -- from a seven-month injury layoff, and scored on his first shot on net as the Lightning beat the Dallas Stars 5-2 Wednesday in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup final.
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Peel police seek public assistance in identifying sex assault suspect in Brampton
The assault took place Sunday in the Steeles Avenue East and Parkhurst Square area.
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North Korea fired at a South Korean government official, burned his body: Seoul
North Korea didn't immediately respond to the South Korean announcement.
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The Lightning are two wins away from the Stanley Cup after taking Game 3. The Stamkos effect was short but sweet
In his first game since late February, Tampa captain Steven Stamkos scored just 6:58 into the game, but didn’t play much after that — just five shifts and 2:47 of ice time. His status will be a storyline to watch heading into Friday’s Game 4.
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Blue Jays beat Yankees to inch closer to securing post-season berth
Danny Jansen had four hits and scored three times as the Blue Jays used an eight-run sixth inning to put the game out of reach.
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Rosie DiManno: The Blue Jays’ magic number is down to one. The kids are excited. They can taste the playoffs
Leadoff man Cavan Biggio, son of a Hall of Famer, calls this “the most fun I’ve ever had on the baseball field.” The Jays can clinch a wild-card spot Thursday. Then they have a list of tricky decisions to make, Rosie DiManno writes.
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Nenshi says Calgary could end homelessness ‘within 2 years’ with help from province, feds
Nenshi's comments come after a throne speech in which the federal government committed to ending chronic homelessness in Canada.
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Impact's free fall continues, with no quick solutions in sight
"We didn't play well. We didn't win our battles. We didn't show up when we had to get on the ball," Samuel Piette says after 3-1 loss to Revolution.
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#ICYMI: Hospitals, unlike shelves, are filling up
With hospitalizations at their highest point since July, the provincial government clarified that it wouldn't be giving police special power to enter homes and enforce COVID-19 rules
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
NASA plans to land woman, and next man, on moon by 2024
The move is in line with its mandate to establish sustainable space exploration by the end of this decade, the agency said Monday, laying out its plan in a 74-page opus.
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One person in serious condition after motorcycle crash in Brampton, say police
The collision took place at Charolais Boulevard and Torrance Woods, said Peel police
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Searchers find bodies in Jasper National Park, remains believed to be missing couple
“It is believed the couple were hiking and succumbed to their injuries after falling from a steep bank in the area,” RCMP said in a release.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Don Martin: The prime minister talks turkey in a political address to the nation
The prime minister’s rare televised address was little more than an echo of the throne speech and an overtly-partisan listing of government actions already taken, Don Martin writes in his latest column for CTVNews.ca.
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Pozuelo’s late penalty secures Toronto FC a win over New York City FC
Toronto (7-2-4) ended NYCFC’s unbeaten run at six games (4-0-2) — a stretch that saw it concede just two goals.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Government report finds fault with operators of Herron seniors' residence
Sylvain Gagnon says the West Island CIUSSS should continue managing the facility and laws must be strengthened to prevent a similar tragedy.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Lethbridge sees drop in opioid-related EMS calls as province reports jump in overdose deaths
The province's COVID-19 Opioid Response Surveillance Report was released on Wednesday, shining a light on some alarming numbers from the first half of 2020. 
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'Organizational Negligence' At Quebec Care Home Where Dozens Died: Report
MONTREAL — The owners of a private long-term care home in suburban Montreal where dozens of residents died during the COVID-19 pandemic in March and April displayed “organizational negligence,” according to a new report.The Quebec government released the report into Residence Herron on Wednesday, as well as a separate report that looked into a public long-term care home north of Montreal where 100 residents died.In total, 38 people died at Residence Herron between March 26 and April 16, including 23 who died in less than a week between April 5 and 10, the report states.Commissioned by the provincial government, the investigation concludes that authorities at Herron repeatedly failed to address shortcomings noted in prior inspection reports and in a coroner’s report, largely because of vacancies in key posts and a turnover rate that reached 20 per cent a year.“It is clear with such a turnover of staff, things must continually be redone,” the report reads.The report details the chaos that followed the discovery of a first case of COVID-19 on March 26, and its devastating effects on a residence that was described as ill-prepared to confront a pandemic.The private facility was placed under government trusteeship after regional health authorities in late March found only three employees on site to care for 133 residents, some of whom were sitting in overflowing diapers and suffering from dehydration.In the days that followed the first case, residents and staff began showing symptoms. There was no protective equipment until March 28, “except for a few masks,” the report reads. Staff began staying home, either out of fear or because they were told to go into isolation.On March 29, co-owner Samantha Chowieri texted the local health authority to inform them that the residence was short at least 27 people, including nurses, auxiliaries and care attendants.A team dispatched from the health authority found dirty floors, air that smelled of urine and feces and residents who were thirsty and dehydrated.“Several (residents) were soiled, because their incontinence briefs had overflowed and the beds were dirty and the stains suggested it was several days old,” the report says.  “When the incontinence briefs were changed, several residents had burns on their skin and the hygiene of the genital areas had not been done adequately.”Managers didn’t have ‘malicious’ intentionsIn a statement, Herron’s owners said they would take the time to carefully analyze the report before commenting.The investigator commissioned by the health minister, Sylvain Gagnon, also criticized Herron’s owners for failing to collaborate with health authorities, who eventually sought a court order on the matter.He concludes that the managers of the facility did not have “malicious” intentions but they did not have full control over their facility and they lacked understanding of what was required to respond to residents’ needs.“As a result, I must conclude that in the present affair the authorities of the Herron CHSLD demonstrated organizational negligence,” Gagnon writes.But the investigator reserved some of his harshest criticism for the province’s health-care system, which he says failed to address problems with long-term care and persistent staff shortages across the network.He was highly critical of the former Liberal provincial government’s health-care reform of 2015, which was supposed to save costs and improve organization but had a negative effect on patient care, he said.“Were our elders forgotten? Did the authorities at the time lack foresight? We have to answer in the affirmative,” he said.He also recommended the province study whether private long-term care homes have the resources to adequately meet the needs of people who have serious health conditions or loss of autonomy.The government also made public a report into the Ste-Dorothee long-term care home in Laval, which had the province’s highest death toll in the pandemic.Investigator Yves Benoit found that pre-existing staff shortages were exacerbated when staff members had to self-isolate due to exposure and agencies refused to send their workers to hot zones.Asymptomatic employees helped COVID-19 spread through the facility, throwing it into a crisis that resulted in more than 40 per cent of residents testing positive in early April.READ MORE Ontario Must Address Long-Term Care Staffing Crisis As Cases Surge: Unions Quebec Facing ‘Second Wave’ As Coronavirus Cases Rise Despite Restrictions COVID Infections Among Canadian Health-Care Workers Are Above Global Average The Last Months Of A Canadian Who Died Of COVID-19 In ICE Custody Managers at the nursing home criticized health authorities for not setting foot on the site, leading them to feel abandoned.The report concluded that the workers did the best they could, and the problems at Ste-Dorothee were largely the same as those faced by other long-term care homes: a lack of staff, ineffective management structure and shortages of personal protective equipment.In a statement, Health Minister Christian Dube said the government has already acted on many of the recommendations in the reports, which were submitted to the government in June and July.“Not only did the major changes undertaken serve to prepare us for the second wave, our actions are sustainable and their benefits will continue after the pandemic,” he said in a statement.Those changes include mandating that a manager be named to lead each long-term care home, raising salaries, hiring thousands of health-care staff and ensuring infection-control measures are in place in each residence.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 23, 2020.Also on HuffPost:
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Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan hosts first event on new permanent site
The first performance on the new Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan site isn't a traditional theatre experience.
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'Not one word recognized the crisis': No love for the throne speech in Alberta
The Liberal government's throne speech took place in Ottawa Wednesday afternoon and it's clear that Alberta Premier Jason Kenney isn't happy about it.
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Alberta couple who vanished while hiking found dead in Jasper National Park
In a Wednesday news release, police said on Tuesday evening two bodies were located by a Parks Canada Visitor Safety helicopter in the Verdant Pass area in Jasper National Park. 
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Hotel owner makes coronavirus safety allegations against Metis Nation-Saskatchewan president
The hotel owner said there were several instances where the president had to be reminded of the hotel’s safety policies.
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Woman waits 7 hours for COVID-19 test, calls it ‘unacceptable in a modern city like Toronto’
East Toronto resident Chelsea Kennedy went to Michael Garron Hospital's COVID-19 assessment centre Tuesday morning, fully expecting a long wait.
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Alberta government to demolish Legislature Annex building after finding repairs would cost $29M
The cost of repairs were so high because of the numerous issues in the nearly 70-year-old building, including its windows, elevators, and roofing issues. Many parts of the space also have layers of peeling lead paint. 
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Weighted blankets can help those with anxiety, depression get a better night's sleep: study
According to a new study from Sweden, for those battling insomnia spurred on by mental illness, a weighted chain blanket might be the key to finally getting a good night's sleep.
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Saskatchewan resort providing staycation destination for locals during pandemic
The Champetre County Resort has seen a drastic drop in guests this year, but because of local support, it has been able to remain open during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Notes on the Throne Speech, and a reminder that Julie Payette is governor general
Paul Wells: The speech was further from 'bold solutions' and closer to 'old ways of thinking'. Then the PM took to the TV to deliver another message. The post Notes on the Throne Speech, and a reminder that Julie Payette is governor general appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Anti-racism group angered by Premier Kenney’s response to Red Deer violence
A MacEwan University professor says the premier should have said more in response to violence at a Red Deer anti-racism rally.
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Blue Jays wish senior dog well after he is seriously injured at off-leash park
The Toronto Blue Jays took to social media to wish a senior dog well after he was allegedly injured at an off-leash park in Vaughan, Ont. last week.
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Elections Saskatchewan recruiting up to 17K workers for pandemic vote
Elections Saskatchewan has been studying Wisconsin, South Korea and Australia to see how COVID-19 affected electoral processes there.
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Man charged in connection with April homicide in Montreal
A 48-year old man has been charged with second-degree murder in connection with the city's 16th homicide on Montreal police territory.
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Steven Stamkos returns to Lightning lineup for Game 3 against Stars
The Tampa Bay captain last played Feb. 25, before the pandemic break and core muscle surgery.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
John Ivison: Good luck to the political leader who calls for more restrained spending
Justin Trudeau beguiled the television networks into giving him free airtime to address an issue of “urgent national importance.” In the event, he delivered a political broadcast on behalf of the Liberal Party, a specious reiteration of the throne speech delivered hours earlier by the Governor General. The move may yet backfire on the prime minister. In a poll earlier this month, more than half of respondents said they didn’t know Erin O’Toole well enough to say whether they had a positive or negative impression of the new Conservative leader. Many more will know him now, following his own national address. It was at least a reminder that, while the speech from the throne is commonly depicted as a vision statement, it is in reality an overtly political document, designed in this case to wrest control of the narrative from the opposition parties. "Today Mr. Trudeau told millions of Canadians that building back better doesn't include their family. I believe we need to build back stronger as a country," Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole says in address to Canadians about today's #ThroneSpeech pic.twitter.com/4ck3za6D4S— CPAC (@CPAC_TV) September 23, 2020 The Liberals suffered a torrid summer as parliamentary committees delved into the WE charity affair. The throne speech offered the government the chance to draft a new agenda that the opposition parties will be forced to support or vote down. By making the plan as generous as possible – witness the extension of the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy until an unspecified date next summer – the government has all but guaranteed it will not be defeated over the throne speech. NDP leader Jagmeet Singh said the speech didn’t go far enough but it would be a shock if he decides to vote against such a profligate manifesto. The CEWS extension will add to a deficit already pushing $400 billion (since its inception in March, CEWS has cost $35 billion, so it is reasonable to assume it will pile another $50 billion on to the national debt, if applied to all sectors.) Yet it will likely be a wildly popular move. As the number of new COVID cases continue to rise – over the past seven days we have seen 1,123 new cases, compared to 380 in mid-August – confidence in in short supply. But was retaining CEWS for another nine months the best use for $50 billion? There is a case to be made that the funds should be targeted at those industries that have been hardest hit – the restaurant business, for example. But good luck to the political leader who calls for more restrained spending. Sean Speer: Trudeau has laid a trap. Here's how Erin O'Toole can avoid it Liberal throne speech offers pandemic recovery plan with big price tag Conservatives say Trudeau's 'grand gestures' fail to recognize plight of oil and gas sector Throne speech has big promises on childcare and health — but that will take negotiations with provinces Read full text of Liberal government's 2020 throne speech delivered by Julie Payette We already know the Liberal line of attack. “This is not the time for austerity,” said  Gov. Gen. Julie Payette. The speech claimed that the government will continue to be guided by “the values of sustainability and prudence” yet there was no indication of due diligence or concern about the level of deficit spending. The prevailing theory in Liberal circles is that interest rates are so low that governments are obliged to lock in and borrow without remorse. Since the Bank of Canada holds 60 per cent of all outstanding Government of Canada securities, we can afford to risk upsetting international markets, the thinking goes. But as former Liberal advisor Robert Asselin pointed out, the Bank’s quantitative easing is a temporary measure to boost demand and make sure rates stay low during the crisis. “The idea that the Bank of Canada will continue to buy billions in government bonds indefinitely is false,” he said. The message does not seem to have percolated to his former colleagues. The throne speech promises a hectic fall agenda – and the spending implications are eye-watering. It’s not that the measures proposed are undesirable. But the question is: are they necessary? Do they contribute more to growth than debt? One area that would have passed that test would have been a concrete commitment to roll out rural broadband, to support people who have struggled to work from home without fast and affordable Internet. The government said it would “accelerate” its broadband roll out but as Matt Hatfield of the Open Media campaign pointed out, how do you accelerate something that has fallen so far behind? “There’s no sign our government is acting on the urgency of Canada’s growing digital divide,” he said. All governments look at things through a political lens – this one more than most. The Trudeau Liberals have promised to get to net zero emissions by 2050, a commitment made without much thought to the implications for the country’s biggest source of export revenue – the oil and gas industry. Internally, the Liberals are said to have resolved that net zero cannot be achieved if oil and gas production is allowed to increase, so the plan is to use regulation to limit growth – a decision made without regard to the balance of payments. This kind of woolly thinking permeates the throne speech. The government promises “significant, long-term and sustained investments” in a Canada-wide early learning and childcare system. Paul Martin’s Liberal government tried something similar 15 years ago. Ken Dryden, the social development minister, eventually signed up all the provinces, but only on the condition that Ottawa handed over the cheque and then minded its own business. Since then Quebec has built out its own subsidized daycare system and is unlikely to participate in a national program, even though it will demand any funding that is going. Getting women back into the workforce is critical. Female participation in the labour force dipped below 55 per cent in April, for the first time since the mid 1980s. Employment among single mothers fell 12 per cent between February and June. Reversing those trends is urgent but it’s far from clear that negotiating a national daycare strategy with the provinces is the answer – after all, it took a year to come to an agreement last time around. But then, the intent in the throne speech is to propose measures, rather than implement them. With such a busy agenda, the government will be talking about things it wants to talk about. One of those measures will be a plan to exceed Canada’s 2030 climate goals, the Governor General said. The last time the Parliamentary Budget Officer looked at the government’s climate plan, Canada was on course to miss its Paris target by 79 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. The speech contained some clues about how this gap might be filled – the energy efficient retrofitting of homes and buildings, investments in zero-emissions vehicles and nature-based solutions like tree-planting. But we will have to wait on ministerial mandate letters and the government’s economic response plan later this fall to get a better sense of the level of ambition. (Every indication is it will be in line with the final report by the Taskforce for Resilient Recovery that came out last week and suggested spending $55.4 billion over five years for many of these measures, including around $27 billion for retrofits – a plan that would cut, coincidentally, 79 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.) Again, opposition leaders will have to support a proposal that could create thousands of jobs in the construction industry, or propose an alternative. It is a strategy that has worked for the Liberals in the past – promise Canadians the sun, the moon and the stars, and then contrast that with the more tight-fisted, terrestrial offerings made by the opposition. This throne speech is a clever political document. But it takes our current prosperity for granted and does little to promote long-term growth. • Email: jivison@postmedia.com | Twitter: IvisonJ
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Leading CCMA Awards nominee Tenille Townes on ‘silver lining’ of a ‘strange’ year
Tenille Townes is making waves in Nashville, but the Alberta-raised musician says her heart will be back home this weekend for the biggest night in Canadian country music.
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Trudeau Appeals To Canadians After Tories, Bloc Say They Can’t Support Throne Speech
OTTAWA — In the face of rising COVID-19 infections, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Wednesday it’s likely Canadians have lost the chance to gather together for Thanksgiving, but there’s still a shot at Christmas.Trudeau delivered a rare national address Wednesday, asking Canadians to be resilient in the face of a second wave of COVID-19 infections that he said is “already underway.” He repeated many of the promises outlined in the throne speech, read hours earlier by Governor General Julie Payette, pledging to protect Canadians’ incomes during the coronavirus pandemic.“The federal government will have your back, whatever it takes, to help you get through this crisis,” Trudeau said in the televised address broadcast from his Ottawa office.Watch: Tam urges Canadians to limit contacts again as COVID-19 cases rise. Story continues below video. The throne speech marks the opening of a new parliamentary session. The previous session came to a close last month after the prime minister asked the Governor General to prorogue Parliament. Trudeau spoke to Canadians directly through the live address after opposition parties voiced their disappointment in the throne speech. The prime minister had previously set expectations that it would be a blueprint for the “economic recovery of our generation.”The 17-page speech highlighted an “ambitious” COVID-19 recovery plan which includes proposals to extend the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy through to next summer and create a national child-care system. It’s a non-binding document that serves to outline the government’s agenda for an upcoming session of Parliament.It paid special attention to women — particularly those who earn low incomes — who have been hardest hit by the pandemic, said Payette.“We must not let the legacy of the pandemic be one of rolling back the clock on women’s participation in the workforce, nor one of backtracking on the social and political gains women and allies have fought so hard to secure,” she read.The throne speech also carved space for plenty of Liberal promises made during the election campaign, including recycling a pledge to ban “harmful” single-use plastics and repeating a promise to take action on online hate. It also put a spotlight on climate action, calling it a “cornerstone” of the Liberal government’s plan to create one million jobs.The government’s much-anticipated speech wasn’t an immediate hit with opposition parties. Canadians could face a snap election this fall if Trudeau’s minority government is unable to shore enough support to survive a confidence vote on the throne speech expected next week.Conservatives said they could not support the throne speech, suggesting the deliverance of “Liberal buzzwords” and “grand gestures with very little to no follow-up plan” did not justify the cancellation of committees when Trudeau prorogued Parliament. Conservative Deputy Leader Candice Bergen told reporters the speech’s contents didn’t have much for agricultural workers, single parents, mortgage owners or small businesses owners.“It doesn’t speak at all of national unity, it doesn’t speak of our energy sector and our workers in Alberta and Saskatchewan and Manitoba,” she said. The lack of a fiscal plan has also made Conservatives “very, very displeased,” Bergen said, adding that her party is ready for election should one be called.It doesn’t speak at all of national unity, it doesn’t speak of our energy sector and our workers in Alberta and Saskatchewan and Manitoba.Conservative Deputy Leader Candice BergenConservative Leader Erin O’Toole did not attend the speech from the throne ceremony because he remains quarantined at home after testing positive for COVID-19 last week. O’Toole did, however, tape his reaction to Trudeau’s address outside his home. Without explicitly saying whether or not his party would support the throne speech, O’Toole brought up other issues, such as western alienation and China-Canada relations.  Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet followed O’Toole with a response filmed outside his home in Shawinigan, Que. where he is quarantined for two weeks after testing positive for COVID-19 last week.Blanchet was more direct, saying his party cannot support the government in a confidence vote if the exclusive jurisdiction of Quebec is not respected.It was one of four asks the party made for inclusion in the throne speech. The other three items on the Bloc’s wishlist included increased health transfers to Quebec, support for seniors and compensation for agricultural producers under supply management.The federal government has a week to increase health-care transfers, otherwise the Bloc will vote against the throne speech, Blanchet said.In NDP leader Jagmeet Singh’s address to Canadians, he acknowledged people’s concerns about a second wave of new COVID-19 cases.“We see you, we hear you, and we’re going to keep fighting for you,” he said. Singh outlined the conditions of his support to reporters earlier, saying the government needs to come through on a commitment to bring in a national paid sick leave program if it is serious about building the economic and public health conditions necessary to flatten the curve of a second wave of COVID-19 infections.The program was included in a $19-billion “safe restart agreement” reached between the federal, provincial and territorial governments in July.“If you want New Democrat party support, if you want my support, then you have to stop the proposal to cut help to Canadians who cannot get back to work and make sure you put in place paid sick leave for all Canadian workers,” he said.Singh said he needs more time to review the throne speech to decide if he will support or vote against it.RELATED 10 Key Highlights From The Liberal Throne Speech Climate Action Will Be ‘Cornerstone’ In Creating 1 Million Jobs: Liberals Guaranteed Basic Income Won’t Be Stealing Spotlight In Liberal Throne Speech Premiers Ask Feds For Billions In Additional Health-Care Funding
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Volkswagen unveils ID.4 electric SUV
No pricing available yet, but vehicle looks to deliver plenty of space and a solid 400 km of range.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Canada adds 1,085 new coronavirus cases as Trudeau warns of second wave
The new infections reported Wednesday bring the country's total case count to 147,612.
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Some Ontario Pharmacies Will Start COVID-19 Testing This Week
TORONTO — Up to 60 Ontario pharmacies will offer COVID-19 tests starting Friday, an initiative the government hopes will help reduce long waits at assessment centres across the province.Premier Doug Ford announced the pharmacy testing Wednesday as the second part of a fall pandemic preparedness plan, saying it would be expanded in the coming weeks.Pharmacies will only test individuals with no symptoms after they have made an appointment. Ford stressed that those experiencing symptoms must continue to go to the hospital-run assessment centres.“We need to make it easier to get a COVID test,” he said. “It’s easy to get a flu shot, we have to make sure that (getting) a COVID test is just as easy.”Ford has been under increasing pressure to address long lines at some of the province’s 147 assessment centres as the demand for tests surged following the return to school earlier this month. Hours before Wednesday’s pharmacy announcement, a hospital in Kitchener, Ont., closed its drive-through COVID-19 testing centre for the day over concerns for the safety of its staff and the public.The Grand River Hospital said vehicles began to line up at 2:30 a.m., five hours before opening time, and “aggressive behaviours” from some of those waiting contributed to the decision to temporarily shut down. Health Minister Christine Elliott said the pharmacy testing — which will be free — will help the province get ready for future waves of COVID-19. She noted, however, that anyone getting a pharmacy test will need to be pre-screened ahead of their appointment.“With a recent increase in the number of cases we are providing people with more options for testing to identify cases of COVID-19 early,” she said.A union representing hospital workers raised concerns that pharmacy testing could bring people with the virus in contact with vulnerable seniors or other medically compromised people.“Sending the public to a pharmacy and mingling with people who fear that they have COVID-19, and may be symptomatic … seems to me to be unwise and potentially not very safe,” said Michael Hurley, president of the Council of Hospital Unions, a branch of the Canadian Union of Public Employees.Can be done safely: association CEOBut the CEO of the Ontario Pharmacist Association said testing can be conducted safely in pharmacies.“The initial phase was meant to be small to so that we could do this in a safe way and learn from the initial roll out and make any tweaks necessary as we go more province-wide” Justin Bates said.Pharmacies have put pandemic infection-control protocols in place to protect their staff and patrons, but some locations may still decide not to participate in the voluntary program, he said.“This won’t be for everyone,” Bates said. “Those that don’t have the appropriate staffing levels or the footprint in order to maintain physical distancing and having a private room to conduct the test may not participate.”READ MORE Ontario Hospitals To Lay Off Over 100 Nurses Despite Staff Shortages Getting A Flu Shot Might Not Be Easy This Year — But It's Worth It Shaming Young People As Party Animals Ignores Their Actual COVID-19 Risks Ontario Must Address Long-Term Care Staffing Crisis As Cases Surge: Unions Ford also said Wednesday that three Ontario hospitals will begin offering saliva testing as a less invasive testing option. He urged Health Canada to approve wider saliva testing to help speed up COVID-19 assessments.“Health Canada, we need your help,” he said. “I just can’t stress it enough, all I’m hearing is crickets right now from Health Canada on the saliva tests.”The government is expected to continue to announce other parts of its pandemic preparedness plan over the coming days. The first piece involved purchasing millions of seasonal flu shots that all residents are encouraged to get.Ontario reported 335 new cases of COVID-19 Wednesday, along with three new deaths related to the virus.The province also reported 42 new COVID-19 cases related to schools, including at least 21 among students. Those bring the number of schools with a reported case to 153 out of Ontario’s 4,828 publicly-funded schools.The total number of cases in Ontario now stands at 48,087, which includes 2,835 deaths and 41,600 cases classified as resolved.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 23, 2020.
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Man charged in Montreal's 16th homicide of the year
A 64-year-old man who was found unconscious in his home died of his injuries a few days later.
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