How Toronto’s music community came together to pull off a pandemic wedding


Canadian actress Erin Agostino and “Sam Roberts Band” drummer, Josh Trager got married last month at the El Mocambo, thanks to a little help from their friends.
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Montreal-area high school shutters amid more than 30 coronavirus cases
At Gérard-Filion High School, 26 students and seven staff members have tested positive for COVID-19.
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Man charged with impaired driving involving a golf cart in City of Kawartha Lakes: OPP
A Bowmanville man has been charged with impaired driving following a collision involving a golf cart.
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Scarborough author’s story brings Caribbean sounds and flavours to life
Yolanda Marshall is eager to represent every possible Caribbean background found in Toronto and show how this diversity enriches a potluck party in her latest book.
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Alberta horse owners on alert after outbreak of Potomac horse fever
Potomac horse fever produces mild colic, fever and diarrhea in horses of all ages, as well abortions in pregnant mares.
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Armenia, Azerbaijan battle for 2nd day as death toll rises
It was not immediately clear what sparked the fighting, the heaviest since clashes in July killed 16 people from both sides.
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B.C. election: Liberals to reveal big economic pledge, NDP to keep touting health care
BC Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson is scheduled make a "major economic announcement" on Monday at 9 a.m.
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This 36-year-old Toronto bartender lost his job due to COVID-19. His goal of saving to buy a home has been wiped away. Now, he’s just in survival mode
With a debt of $1,500, which he’s afraid will eventually grow, Bob wants to know what a money coach would say about his finances during the pandemic.
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Elderly man charged after indecent act in St. Thomas
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Trial for accused double-murderer Adam Strong set to begin in Oshawa
Strong faces first-degree murder charges in the deaths of Rori Hache and Kandis Fitzpatrick, and his trial in Oshawa will proceed in front of a judge alone.
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Fire marshal to investigate 11 suspicious vehicle fires in Thornhill
Houses were evacuated overnight but residents expected to return home Monday morning.
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Man injured after shooting on Hamilton Mountain
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Pop-up COVID-19 testing site coming to Gananoque on Monday
The town of Gananoque is gearing-up for a pop-up COVID-19 testing site.
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Halifax man shares video of his alleged assault by man he reported for suspected domestic abuse
Halifax Regional Police declined an interview, but in a statement said “it is important to remember that the police do not have the ability or authority to evict residents from their homes in these circumstances.”
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Childhood lessons, fight with cancer helped B.C. Premier John Horgan forge political goals
The NDP leader was willing to listen, but he stood firm when he needed to.
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In spite of itself, baseball gets to its playoffs and that's a good thing
An aberration of a season ends with the Blue Jays still playing. And this is a very special day
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Second week of British Columbia’s election campaign begins
B.C.’s main political party leaders spent the weekend focusing on health care promises as the first week of the campaign ended.
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Thank yous outnumber complaints 3 to 1 in Urgences-santé's annual report
The report showed that between April 2019 and March 2020, the service received 373,510 calls and had to respond to 284,341 of them — a record 777 calls a day.
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Arkansas man finds 9-carat diamond he thought was glass
Kevin Kinard was visiting Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park when he discovered a 9.07 carat diamond.
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Trump’s taxes: Key takeaways from the New York Times report
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Amazon to hire 3,500 workers in Ontario and B.C., expand office footprint
Amazon revealed Monday that 3,000 of the jobs will be in Vancouver, where it is growing its footprint, and another 500 will be in Toronto, home of a new Amazon workspace.
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Former Trump campaign manager hospitalized after self-harm threats
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2 boaters rescued near Burlington lift bridge after boat capsized
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Toronto school temporarily closes after COVID-19 outbreak
Mason Road JPS will be closed from Monday, Sept. 28, to Friday, Oct. 2, after three staff and one student tested positive for coronavirus.
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Coronavirus continues to delay overdue military procurements, official says
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Joe Ortona acclaimed as new EMSB chair as most commissioners face no opposition
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COVID-19 aid bill expected to headline Parliament’s first full week
Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole and the Bloc Quebecois chief Yves-Francois Blanchet will return to the House of Commons after being benched due to COVID-19.
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The conservative case for toppling statues: Why 'bad men' shouldn't be revered in the public square
It may have been the easiest political no-brainer of the year when Conservative leader Erin O’Toole rushed to condemn the unruly mob that brought Sir John A. Macdonald’s statue tumbling down in Montreal last month. Even Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who has won elections by outflanking the NDP to the left, thought about it for a day or two and then denounced the “vandalism” that has “no place in a society that abides by the rule of law.” Trudeau’s advisers have likely seen polling that shows only 11 per cent of Canadians approve of mobs spontaneously pulling down statues and only 31 per cent of people support some political process that removes the statues of politicians, even if the person implemented racist policies. In general, Canadians like statues and monuments of their first prime minister and people who vote Conservative especially like them . But as McGill University political theory professor Jacob T. Levy argues, maybe revering “great men” isn’t a good way to figure out public morals. Levy thinks we should be thinking a little harder about who we idolize. For support and to help convince conservatives, Levy points to the words of 18th century Scottish economist Adam Smith, who gave the world “the invisible hand” of the free market and whose classical liberal economics were vital to 20th century conservatism. Smith believed we are hard-wired to venerate powerful people, whether they are morally upright or not, and that this is an impulse we should fight back against. “Even when the order of society seems to require that we should oppose them, we can hardly bring ourselves to do it,” wrote Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments. We look at political leaders in “delusive colours in which the imagination is apt to paint in,” creating a “peculiar sympathy.” Canadians opposed to 'spontaneous' toppling of monuments to figures seen as racist: poll Trudeau calls out vandals who toppled Montreal's Macdonald statue Condemnation for 'mob' that pulled down statue of Sir John A. Macdonald in Montreal Levy also points to the words of Lord Acton, who famously said that “power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.” Levy argues that if Smith and Acton are right, then we are honouring the wrong people almost across the board. And that extends to people like Macdonald, whose triumphs in government are marked in equal measure by outrages, said Levy in an interview with the National Post. “There’s no doing without Macdonald in Canadian political history. But that doesn’t mean that celebration has to be a uncritical or has to conceal what is actually a very complicated institutional legacy,” said Levy. In an article for the Niskanen Center in the United States, Levy divides these historical leaders into three categories. The first are people who committed dishonourable acts and are celebrated precisely for those acts, like Jefferson Davis, who is remembered as the president of the confederacy during the U.S. civil war and a defender of slavery. There are also people who lived unimpeachable public lives, like George Washington, who also owned slaves in his private life. When Washington is publicly revered, it’s for his role as a founding father rather than his private sins. In Levy’s view, Macdonald represents a middle-ground because he is venerated for a record that has troubling moments along with the great triumphs. “His wrongs were official wrongs. The head tax and the treatment of First Nations, those are as much a part of his legacy as building Confederation in a way that differs from the private slave-owning of American founders,” said Levy. “That means that his legacy is contested in the same way that the moral character of Canadian Confederation is contested. And I don’t think there’s any way to set aside either part of that.” Smith believed that we sympathize with the dead and pile on affection, especially “when they are in danger of being forgot by everybody.” Because the dead can’t defend themselves people are moved to do it for them or to hold off on criticism. Levy’s response to that is simple: Sir John A. could handle criticism when he was alive and he can surely handle it now. “We not only overestimate the moral standing of rulers, we overestimate the harm in moral criticism of the dead,” wrote Levy. Although conservatives are more likely to defend statues and monuments, progressives are not immune from the phenomenon that Smith describes. The death of United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg provoked a massive wave of grief, even beyond the borders of the U.S. “I absolutely think we’re seeing that Smithian dynamic at work,” said Levy. “There’s been 15 years worth of half tongue-in-cheek idolatry about her. There’s a wildly excessive personalization of the relationship to her.” It’s not just world leaders either. We venerate celebrities and athletes, no matter how many times they disappoint us. The polling on these monuments suggests that many people are more disturbed by the mob action than the actual removal of the statues. When Trudeau gave his comments about the incident in Montreal he singled out the lawlessness for criticism and almost nothing else. Levy believes, though, at the heart of it is our out-sized and often irrational affection for the people who lead us. “There is widespread and justifiable aversion to the sight and the phenomenon of people no one elected taking matters into their own hands,” said Levy. “But the politics of taking statues down through lawful procedures gets so controversial that I’m inclined to doubt that the mob scene is really what’s doing most of the emotional work.” • Email: sxthomson@postmedia.com | Twitter: stuartxthomson
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Pattie Lovett-Reid: When should you break your mortgage for a better rate?
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Can pregnant women’s leftover blood samples help us understand how the coronavirus spread in Canada?
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While you were sleeping: Red alert coming
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One person dead, another in critical condition after shooting in north Etobicoke
Toronto police said the shooting happened near Kipling Avenue and Mt. Olive Drive, just north of Finch Avenue West, shortly after 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
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5 things to know for Monday, September 28, 2020
Canada has had more than 153,100 total cases of COVID-19, with more than 12,700 cases still active.
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Montreal weather: Get out and relish this last gorgeous day
A mix of sun and cloud with a 30-per-cent chance of showers in the afternoon.
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Man in his 60s found dead in Hamilton, police investigating as homicide
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Trial for accused double murderer Adam Strong set to begin in Oshawa
Adam Strong faces first-degree murder charges in the deaths of Rori Hache and Kandis Fitzpatrick, and his trial in Oshawa, Ont., will proceed in front of a judge alone.
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COVID-19 aid bill, Erin O’Toole’s speech headline Parliament’s first full week
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COVID-19 further delaying some overdue military procurements
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$4,000 for a mutt? Coronavirus pushing up puppy prices in Manitoba
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Rick Zamperin: Ryu should start opener of Blue Jays-Rays wild card series
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Six months into covering COVID-19 pandemic, these were the stories that moved us, inspired our journalism
On World News Day, Toronto Star journalists look back covering the COVID-19 pandemic: the stories they’re telling, the data they dig up, and why it is so important to them to keeppushing for trustworthy, reliable information.
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