U.S. executes 1st federal inmate in 17 years
The U.S. government on Tuesday carried out the first federal execution in almost two decades, putting to death a man who killed an Arkansas family in a 1990s.
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RCMP facing new proposed class-action lawsuit alleging systemic racism
A new proposed class-action lawsuit alleges systemic racism within the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
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Richmond Hill firm develops rapid COVID-19 test to get results in less than 5 minutes
As the federal and provincial governments ramp up COVID-19 testing, a Richmond Hill company is breaking new ground in rapid testing.
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Calgary man faces 29 firearms, drug charges after house searched in Chaparral: police
Calgary police have charged 29-year-old Ravinderpaul Gill with 29 firearms and drug-related offences.
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Judge to decide whether Epstein pal Ghislaine Maxwell deserves bail
NEW YORK — A U.S. judge is expected to decide on Tuesday whether to grant bail to Ghislaine Maxwell, Jeffrey Epstein’s longtime associate, who has been charged with luring young girls so the late financier could sexually abuse them. U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan in Manhattan is set to preside over the arraignment of Maxwell, […]
Toronto Sun
Pine Lake tornado survivors relive twister’s terror 20 years later: ‘I was just trying to search for family’
Tuesday marks 20 years since the Pine Lake tornado that killed 12 people. When the menacing clouds started rolling in early on the evening of July 14, 2000, some campers started to take action.
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Saskatchewan Huskies football team urging U Sports board to revisit age cap ruling
University football programs including the Saskatchewan Huskies are pushing U Sports to reconsider a decision not to amend its age cap, despite cancelling the 2020 season.
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Focus on 50-square-kilometre sector as search for Martin Carpentier enters seventh day
Autopsies on the two young girls have been completed but the SQ won't make their findings public until Carpentier is located.
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From collecting trash to Harvard Law: Student shares how he overcame adversity
A former sanitation worker has been accepted into Harvard Law School after he received encouragement from an unlikely source.
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Doug Ford to visit Cambridge, Kitchener on Tuesday
Ontario Premier Doug Ford plans to make stops in Cambridge and Kitchener on Tuesday.
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Ghislaine Maxwell had cell phone wrapped in tin foil 'to evade detection,' prosecution says
British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell ignored the orders of FBI agents during her arrest on sex-trafficking charges, prosecutors said Monday as they urged a U.S. judge to deny her bail request.
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How the death of Mississauga man Ejaz Choudry helped spark a provincewide conversation about police reform
The Malton resident was killed by Peel Regional Police responding to a crisis call in June.
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Manhunt continues in Quebec for father of girls found dead
Investigators are asking the public not to approach Martin Carpentier if he is seen and to call 911.
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Quebec company begins human trials of coronavirus vaccine
Medicago said it dosed the first healthy volunteers on Monday in a 180-person study, making it the first vaccine from Canada among the more than 20 experimental coronavirus vaccines being tested in humans.
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Mike Holmes: A shout-out to the value of a career in the trades
Congratulations, graduates of the class of 2020 — you did it! This year, graduations around the world look a lot different as convocation ceremonies move online while students figure out how to navigate our current world under some pretty extreme circumstances. First, I want to start with something positive. Your generation has the power to change the world. It’ll take hard work, some guts, and a little elbow grease, but I know you’ll accomplish some awesome things. While we all hope things get back to normal soon, the world you’re graduating into is so much different than a year ago. Statistics Canada says that in the month of April, Canada lost upward of two million jobs — and the economic impacts of the pandemic both in Canada and globally are continuing to unfold. Whether you’ve just finished high school, college, or university, the job market looks a lot different than it did back in January. This could have severely affected your plans. A lot of graduates want to take some time to travel, others want to jump right into the workforce. But so many fields have seen severe job losses — and some are feeling the hurt more than others. So why am I painting such a negative picture? I don’t mean to, but I think it’s important to be realistic during these times. Whatever plan you had is likely off the table. Whether that’s just for now, or forever is up to you. Are you making a new plan? If you are, I want to take a moment to shout out the trades. Maybe this wasn’t a career path you were thinking of, even a few months ago. But I think they’re worth a look. The trades remain a viable, necessary career path. We need our tradespeople to build our homes, our hospitals, our roads, and a lot more. Are the trades recession proof? Not entirely — just like everyone else, our crew shut down at the beginning of the pandemic. Our crew is finally starting to get back to work after all our work sites shut down in March. However, certain trades will always be in demand. Even if we’re not able to run a full construction site, professions like plumbers and electricians will still be needed. Our homes still need maintenance, after all! I was talking to my friend, Shaun Thorson about this, recently. Shaun is the chief executive officer for Skills/Compétences Canada, a program that’s all about promoting the skilled trades as a viable career. It’s something I’ve been involved in for years — and it’s a program that I love, because it makes our young tradespeople feel like absolute rock stars as they take the next steps in their career in the trades. Here’s what he told me about the importance of the trades during our “new normal.” “When the world faced lockdown due to COVID-19, many of Canada’s skilled trade and technology professionals ensured our quality of life by providing us with daily necessities such as keeping the lights on, the water running, food on our tables, and keeping us connected. Now is the time for new graduates or those re-entering the workforce to consider a rewarding career in the skilled trades and technologies.” The trades are a good career, no matter what. Recession or no, Canada is still facing a skilled trades shortage. We need more people to fill the void left by our current generation of workers as they retire. Now is a good time to get started on your journey in the trades. Start researching technical programs that can teach you the know-how you need to do the job right. Look into programs like Skills Canada — a lot of events are shifting to online versions this year, you may even be able to take part right from your home! None of us could have predicted what this year was going to bring us. To be honest, I’ve never spent this much time at home before — it’s been an adjustment period for all of us. We all have a responsibility to crush the curve as much as possible, so that we can return to life safely. Stay safe, stay home if you can, wash your hands, and wear a mask. I’ll see you soon. To find out more about Mike Holmes, visit makeitright.ca
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Relaxed coronavirus restrictions means a Rockport, Ont., tour boat line will be able to reopen
With Stage 3, tour boat operators can soon welcome more people aboard for sightseeing cruises. 
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Terror suspect Mohamed Mahjoub wages court fight for info in bid to stave off deportation
The government is trying to remove Mahjoub, 60, using a national security certificate, claiming he was a high-ranking member of a terrorist organization.
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While you were sleeping: Nothing is forever, except maybe this humidity
Stay hydrated and wear a mask.
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Watchdog probes death during SQ pursuit of speeder in Mascouche
As the motorist tried to leave the highway, he lost control of his vehicle and skidded off the road.
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Ontario health-care workers to announce political action in response to emergency orders
Health-care workers, including nurses, say the orders suspend their collective bargaining agreement with the province.
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Activists warn coronavirus vaccine could be hoarded by rich countries
While no country can afford to buy doses of every potential vaccine candidate, many poor ones can't afford to place such speculative bets at all.
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A metre-long python's on the loose in Gatineau. Police say it's unthreatening
The local SPCA says the snake, which has been on the loose for days, simply rolls itself into a ball when it feels frightened or threatened.
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60 MPs urge sanctions against Chinese officials
A letter quoting the PM's own foreign minister calls on the government to take action against Chinese and Hong Kong officials over 'human rights atrocities' The post 60 MPs urge sanctions against Chinese officials appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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IN PHOTOS: A look back at the Pine Lake tornado 20 years later
It's been 20 years since a devastating tornado ripped through central Alberta, killing 12 people and injuring 100 others.
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Dutch duplex is a ship-to-shore innovation
Pirates and open seas inspired the design of the Freebooter duplex in Amsterdam
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Premier Doug Ford launching campaign-style tour of Ontario
Ford is going on an election-style summer tour of the province, making stops in places like Cambridge, Kitchener and Essex County, as they reopen after months of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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The hunt for a vaccine: Canadian company begins human testing of COVID-19 candidate
A Quebec City biopharmaceutical company began clinical trials on humans on Monday for a plant-derived COVID-19 vaccine.
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U.K. to stop using Huawei for 5G networks by 2027
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson ordered Huawei equipment to be purged completely from Britain's 5G network by 2027, risking the ire of China by signaling that the world's biggest telecoms equipment maker is no longer welcome in the West.
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Poll suggests Canadians are torn on scaling back COVID-19 benefits to save money
The poll suggests that Canadians are torn on whether the government ought to immediately and quickly begin to scale back pandemic support programs to keep the national deficit from flooding Canada’s future.
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Lethbridge city council passes bylaw banning conversion therapy
Lethbridge has joined a handful of other Alberta municipalities, including Calgary and Edmonton, in the banning of conversion therapy. 
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India’s coronavirus cases spike again, bringing total closer to 1 million
India has largely lifted its nationwide lockdown, and the virus has been spreading at a significant rate, prompting several big cities to impose partial lockdowns.
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Family ‘shocked’ after police release mug shot to identify Toronto homicide victim, advocate calls for review
'This will never go away. This will always be the last memory, particularly in these days of social media.'
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Bus driver in China deliberately crashed, killing 21 after house was demolished
A driver deliberately crashed a bus full of passengers into a reservoir in southwestern China, hours after discovering his house had been demolished, local police said Monday.
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QAnon conspiracy theory followers step out of the shadows and may be headed to U.S. Congress
This October will mark three years since the inception of the QAnon movement after someone known only as Q posted a series of conspiracy theories on the internet forum 4chan.
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Man charged after used condoms found on vehicles in Mississauga parking lots, police say
Peel Regional Police say a 74-year-old man is facing charges after used condoms were found tied to vehicles in parking lots of shopping centres across Mississauga. 
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A look at Huawei’s involvement in telecoms networks around the world
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is set to ban Huawei from Britain's 5G network on Tuesday, angering China but delighting U.S. President Donald Trump.
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Quebecers most likely to resume hugging, hand shaking as COVID-19 fears persist across Canada: survey
Quebec might have been the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, but its residents are more willing than most Canadians to resume shaking hands with friends or attending weddings and funerals, according to a survey. In a coming poll by the Association for Canadian Studies, 47.8 per cent of French-speaking respondents said they would hug or shake hands with friends within the next six months, compared with just 33.5 per cent of English-speaking Canadians. It also found that 16 per cent of Quebec respondents would attend a sporting event, concert or play within the next six months, the highest among provinces along with Manitoba and Saskatchewan. That was followed by Atlantic Canada (15 per cent), Alberta (14 per cent), British Columbia (10 per cent), and Ontario (eight per cent). Asked when they would be willing to attend a wedding or a funeral, 24.1 per cent of French respondents said they would attend in the next six months, compared with 19.4 per cent of English respondents. The survey pointed to a wide disparity between the provinces (and the sexes) in their view toward the COVID-19 pandemic, which has entered its fifth month in Canada. It also underscored a broad hesitancy among many Canadians to return to so-called “normal life” following the first wave of viral spread. Thirty-one per cent of respondents across Canada expect that life will “never” return to normal following the pandemic outbreak, while 58 per cent say it will “take time” before they resume normal life. As COVID surges in the U.S., some experts worry about plan to further open up Ontario In Canada, the cases of COVID-19 and deaths are declining. Here's the story behind the numbers Quebec again had the rosiest outlook toward the staying power of the pandemic. The province had the highest proportion of respondents saying it would take some time before life returns to normal (66 per cent), and the lowest proportion saying it would never return (22 per cent). Ontario had the highest share of people suggesting life would “never” return to normal, at 36 per cent, followed by Atlantic Canada (32 per cent), Alberta (32 per cent) and British Columbia (31 per cent). “Quebecers — and francophones in particular — seem to not feel as threatened by the virus, and are less likely to think they’re going to get the virus,” said Jack Jedwab, president and CEO of the Association for Canadian Studies. The survey polled 1,517 Canadians between July 3 and July 5, with a margin of error of 2.5 points, 19 times out of 20. It also surveyed 1,006 Americans over the same period, with a margin of error of 3.1 points, 19 times out of 20. Results of the poll also showed a hesitancy to attend public events within the next year. The largest share of Canadians (51 per cent) said they would not attend a sporting event, concert, or play within the next year, with just 12 per cent saying they would attend in the next six months. Perhaps surprisingly, 13 per cent of respondents said they would “never” again attend a public event. Jedwab said those results conflict with ongoing attempts by various professional sporting leagues to resume competitions with live audiences, as he said demand to attend those events could remain stifled for some time. “There’s a very significant gap right now between getting professional sports back on track, and the nervousness that is being expressed in the survey about attending large-scale gatherings,” Jedwab said. “This may not be a temporary thing,” he said. “The ramifications of this going for one more season are very serious for lots of economies.” There was a significant gap between men and women around questions of attending public events, with 16 per cent of men saying they would attend in the next six months, compared with just eight per cent of women. Men are also more likely to shake hands with friends or family in the next half year, at 37 per cent, compared with 33 per cent of women. Across Canada, people aged 18-34 were more likely to resume attending events, with 17 per cent saying they would do so in the next six months. Eleven per cent of people aged 35-54 said they would attend within six months, and nine per cent of people 54 and up. Zain Chagla, disease specialist and associate professor at McMaster University, said the results fit broadly with past research that suggests women are typically more risk averse than men. “Young men tend to be the group that takes the most risks,” he said. “So that probably fits into that; young men have a bigger sense of being immortal or at least not susceptible to things.” Chagla said a broad avoidance of public gatherings, particularly sporting events or concerts with thousands of attendees, is likely to persist for some time as public officials continue to warn about the threats of the virus. But one-off interactions like hand shaking and hugging are likely to return to normal earlier, as people return to long-held habits. “It’s just so ingrained in our culture,” Chagla said. “We’ve been doing handshakes since the Middle Ages. We’ve been hugging for even longer than that.” • Email: jsnyder@postmedia.com | Twitter: jesse_snyder • Email: cnardi@postmedia.com | Twitter: ChrisGNardi
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Carter or Bautista? High scoring or low? Canadian baseball survey uncorks a few surprises
Along with shorter games, respondents also want to see: a universal designated hitter (which will be tested this season), no leaving the batter’s box during an at-bat, a 20-second pitch clock and expanded playoffs. The responses in several categories, however, revealed a generational split.
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5 things to know for Tuesday, July 14, 2020
Canada has surpassed 108,000 total cases of COVID-19, with nearly 8,800 associated deaths.
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