Water levels drop at Manitoba’s Rivers Dam, but province warns more rain coming
In a flood and highwater update Friday, the province said widespread rain — up to 100 mm — is forecast for many southern Manitoba watersheds over the next week or so.
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‘Hamilton’ review: You say you want a revolution
Filmed in front of a live audience, the streaming version of the musical feels like a peek into the bygone era of 2016.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
MANDEL: They don’t make dames like Yolanda Ballard any more
A name from the past appears on the social media of today, a personality who commanded the headlines of a different time. Yolanda Anna Ballard, 1933-2020 I had missed last month’s obituary. The blowsy-blonde once known, and vilified by many, as YoYo — the First Lady of the Gardens — passed last month at the […]
Toronto Sun
Coronavirus: Board of health to take on mandatory mask issue in Hamilton
Hamilton's medical officer of health says outcomes in other regions of Ontario will likely influence a board of health decision on mandatory masks, next week.
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‘Unsolved Mysteries’ returns, because 2020 isn’t scary enough
The show, which has been brought back by Netflix, debuted in 1988 and endured for decades on various networks and cable channels.
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Stu on Sports: Giving Canadiens fans a reason for optimism vs. Penguins
Fresh start could let them use speed, while coach Claude Julien will need to mix experience and youth. Also catching up with Mike Ribeiro.
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Love Viral Rollerskaters? Celebrate The Black History Behind The Trend
Rollerskating is having a moment right now, thanks to TikTok, which has flooded feeds with clips of carefree skaters cruising on eight wheels as they soak up sunshine on pavement and boardwalks. The mesmerizing trend— which has been slinking in the background of recent pop culture, like HBO’s “Euphoria” and “Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey” — seems to be the perfect antidote to pandemic blues: Strapping on a pair of skates is synonymous with summertime fun, no social distancing required.It helps that experienced skaters like Berlin-based Oumi Janta and instructor Coco Franklin make the recreational hobby looks effortless, pulling off dance moves with heel flicks and carving through concrete like butter.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by O U M I J A N T A (@oumi_janta) on Jun 22, 2020 at 2:23pm PDT View this post on InstagramA post shared by C
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Coronavirus: 31 MLB players, 7 staff test positive for COVID-19 — a rate of 1.2%
The positive tests occurred among 19 of the 30 teams, according to results of the samples sent to the Sports Medicine Research and Testing Laboratory in South Jordan, Utah.
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The real lessons of Telfar, Kanye and the Gap
For the embattled retail company, dropping one Black creative for a more famous one could not have come at a worse time.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
U.S. billionaire’s superyacht arrives in B.C. for ‘necessary repairs’ amid COVID-19
The vessel arrived on the North Shore Tuesday from Port Angeles, Wash., as the U.S. continues to struggle to contain the spread of the coronavirus.
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Many Saskatchewan First Nations residents are travelling hours to get coronavirus treatment
The novel coronavirus poses a heightened threat to Indigenous communities because of limited access to health-care services and socio-economic factors have made them more vulnerable.
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Intervention to free Meng Wanzhou would make Canada look ‘untrustworthy’: expert
Using political intervention to free the Huawei CFO would hurt Canada's reputation, one expert says, favouring a global alliance against China to force the release of the Two Michaels.
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More than 1,880 caught speeding by Toronto police in ticketing blitz
Speeding tickets were issued between June 22 and June 28, and 827 tickets were issued for aggressive driving, and 18 for stunt driving.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Woodbine jockey Isabelle Wenc dislodged, but avoids serious injury
Woodbine rider Isabelle Wenc proved yet again on Friday afternoon that thoroughbred jockeys are some of the toughest athletes in the world. In the first of eight races on Friday’s card, the three-year-old bay filly Five Days in May dislodged Wenc as the field charged down the backstretch. Wenc went down hard and spun on […]
Toronto Sun
Alberta confirms 57 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday
The province has confirmed another 57 cases of COVID-19 Friday, but no additional deaths.
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Cineplex sues Cineworld for $2.18B in wake of failed acquisition
The Canadian movie theatre chain filed the suit in Ontario Superior Court on Friday, detailing what it claims was ``a case of buyer's remorse'' on the part of the U.K. company in the middle of a pandemic.
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Edmonton man with 2 small children charged with impaired driving in Caledon, Ont.
On Wednesday night, officers say they received a report about a white sedan travelling south on Highway 10.
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Ujiri accuser not off the hook just yet
You might have forgotten Alan Strickland’s name by now, but Raptors president Masai Ujiri hasn’t. Nor has karma, apparently. Strickland is the would-be opportunist and an Alameda County sheriff’s deputy whose attempted lawsuit against Ujiri following a Game 6 altercation last June never saw the light of day. In the lawsuit, Strickland claimed Ujiri “hit […]
Toronto Sun
What the new Hong Kong security law means for Canadians — everywhere
Sweeping law imposed by Beijing creates various ways to get into legal trouble — and also applies to anyone outside the region.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Float Plane Crash Near Edmonton Airport Kills 3: RCMP
LEDUC COUNTY, Alta. — RCMP say three people have died in a plane crash south of Edmonton.Mounties say they were alerted Friday morning that a float plane went down in a field in Leduc County east of the Edmonton International Airport.Three bodies were found in the wreckage.Cpl. Laurel Scott said it’s believed no one else was on the aircraft.A manager at the nearby Cooking Lake Airport said the plane’s owner, who is from the area, had gone up with an experienced flight instructor to learn how to use new amphibious floats on the light utility Murphy Moose.Sophie Wistaff, a spokeswoman with the Transportation Safety Board, said two investigators were to arrive in the afternoon at the crash site.She said she could not provide other details.RCMP said officers and firefighters were holding the scene.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 3, 2020Also on HuffPost:
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Trudeau to 'collaborate' with ethics watchdog amid probe into his involvement with WE Charity deal
The federal ethics commissioner has launched an investigation into Prime Minister Justin Trudeau over his government's now-cancelled decision to have WE Charity manage a $900-million federal program, which is slated to pay students and new graduates for their volunteer work this summer.
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Exhibition Place could be future transportation testing ground
The idea is to create a real-world testing environment that could be used by researchers and industry, whose findings could help improve Toronto’s transportation network.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
2nd retail cannabis store coming to Peterborough
A second legal cannabis retail store will be opening in Peterborough this summer. The owners tell Global News how they have had to adapt opening plans in light of COVID-19.
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John Ivison: Ottawa cautiously considers opening Canada's doors to Hongkongers fleeing their 'Tiananmen moment'
Hong Kong has just experienced its “Tiananmen moment,” according to China watcher Margaret McCuaig-Johnston. One of the world’s great cities is having its autonomy, dynamism and creativity leeched from it by the Communist Party of China, following the introduction of a draconian new security law. The law, introduced on June 30th,  subjects everyone in Hong Kong to a strict ban on political activity that Beijing deems a danger to national security. Canada’s response has been limited to expressions of concern, at least until Friday, when Justin Trudeau announced the suspension of this country’s extradition treaty with Hong Kong; a new travel advisory, warning of a “increased risk of arbitrary detention” in the territory; and, the revocation of export permits for “sensitive goods,” like crowd-control equipment used by the Hong Kong Police Force. NP View: The day democracy died in Hong Kong Section applying Chinese national security law to whole world chills Canadian activists Trudeau said Canada is joining the international community in expressing its growing concerns. That’s not strictly true. When the United Nations Human Rights Council took a vote, 53 countries supported China’s crackdown, while only 27 countries criticized the law. The voting pattern shows how effective China’s debt-trap diplomacy has been: Support came from a mix of autocracies like North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Syria, and countries deeply indebted to China as part of its Belt and Road infrastructure project. Francois-Philippe Champagne, the global affairs minister, said Canada is in good company criticizing the law, alongside a number of liberal democracies. Champagne said Ottawa is considering additional measures around immigration, in conjunction with the U.K. and Australia, which have already talked about a “pathway to citizenship” for Hongkongers who want to leave the territory. (Three million Hongkongers born before the 1997 handover hold British National (overseas) passports, which will allow them to settle in the U.K. for five years before applying for citizenship.) Champagne said freedom and liberty are the “pillars” on which Hong Kong was built. “I went there for the first time in 1986 and anyone who has ever been in Hong Kong realizes that there is something special there. This is a significant step back,” he said in an interview. The new security law claims human rights will be respected and “freedom of speech, of the press, of publication and of association… shall be protected”. “Time will tell,” said Champagne. The new law applies life sentences for crimes of terrorism, subversion, secession and collusion. Even the U.N. says the law includes “poorly defined crimes,” easily subject to abuse and repression. What remains to be seen is how strictly those provisions are applied, but the early signs are not encouraging. The law was introduced at 11pm on June 30 and there have been 10 arrests already, with one person detained for carrying a pro-independence flag. Subversion could mean simply “disrupting or undermining” the government. The protesters slogan: “Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our times” has already been deemed seditious, since it condones Hong Kong independence. A new Office for Safeguarding National Security will be created under the legislation, gathering information and handling “complex” cases that may end up being prosecuted on the mainland. The office, which is not subject to Hong Kong law, will “strengthen the management” of relations with international organizations, NGOs and foreign news agencies. The Department of Justice will establish a specialist prosecution division. Trials will be presided over by judges picked by the government, who may decide to dispense with jurors. The package of 66 articles is much worse than anyone had anticipated. The Chinese government has gambled that its clampdown will not kill the golden goose. Hong Kong accounts for just three per cent of Chinese GDP, down from around 25 per cent at the time of the handover in 1997. But the prospect that any criticism of the regime might be interpreted as subversion or collusion with a foreign country will, inevitably, kill the magic that made the territory a magnet for talent and money. McCuaig-Johnston, senior fellow at the China Institute at the University of Alberta, said the dilemma for many people who live there is not about promoting Hong Kong independence, but whether they can protest to protect the level of democracy that already exists. Prominent Hong Kong democracy activist Nathan Law has already fled the city for his own safety. McCuaig-Johnston said Canada should take in Hongkongers who want to come here, if China permits them to leave. Champagne confirmed the government will have more to say in the coming days and weeks. But Ottawa has to weigh the impact of such a move on its efforts to free Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig from Chinese jails. China has called on Britain and Australia to “remedy their mistake,” following their announcements of possible help for Hongkongers. Champagne said “the world is watching” what happens in the territory. But China is oblivious to shaming and impervious to pressure. Xi Jinping simply has no incentive to conform to international rules, as he tries to upturn the status quo in the western Pacific through stealth and intimidation. I write this with immense sadness, knowing that these views could leave me open to arrest if I ever re-visit Hong Kong, a city I love.Carrie Lam, the territory’s puppet chief executive, said Hong Kong will remain an international city for international businesses and international media to come and carry out their activities as normal. That is wishful thinking. Who in their right mind is going to risk their liberty doing business in what is now a surveillance state? It’s a tragedy. Rudyard Kipling wrote that East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet. But then he’d probably never eaten dim sum at 3am in the colourful chaos of Wan Chai. jivison@postmedia.com Twitter.com/IvisonJ
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Why Mandatory Masks Indoors Helps Fight COVID-19 In Canada
Over the last couple of weeks, a particular genre of amateur filmmaking has begun clogging up our social media feeds. Each is filmed in some seemingly arbitrary location, a setting unaccustomed to the spotlight of internet infamy. Grocery stores. Curb-side cafes. Local Walmarts. In all of these clips, the viewer bears witness to the unfolding of a modern horror story: customers, emboldened by their private sense of justice, refuse to wear their masks. Most of these clips have been filmed in the United States, but that isn’t to say versions of them don’t occur in Canada, too. At the end of May, for example, the owners of a convenience store in Toronto reported being attacked by four men after forcibly removing a customer who refused to wear a mask. One of the owners said it was tough to listen to the sounds of her own screams on the video recording from a camera outside. The other’s face was bruised for six weeks after.Municipalities across Ontario have been “seriously exploring” the idea of making face masks mandatory in indoor spaces over the last couple of weeks. And on June 30, as if to answer that strain of bewildering video, Toronto City Council voted unanimously in favour of requiring people to cover their faces in all enclosed public places, including:retail storesconvenience storesmalls, shopping plazasgrocery stores, bakeries, farmer’s markets (enclosed areas)restaurants, bars (when permitted to open for indoor service)indoor recreational facilities, gyms, swimming pools (when permitted to open)librariescommunity centrescommunity service agenciespersonal service settingschurches, mosque, synagogue, temples and faith settingsart galleries, museums, aquariums, zoosbanquet halls, convention centres, arenas, stadiums, and other event spacesreal estate facilities such as open house, presentation centrescommon areas in hotels, motels and short-term rentals (e.g. lobbies, elevators, meeting rooms)entertainment facilities including concert venues, theatres, cinemas, casinosbusiness offices open to the public“It is about respecting and protecting each other,” mayor John Tory said, per CBC, at a news conference on occasion of the temporary bylaw. “We know we are at a critical time in the fight against COVID-19, and that we must do everything we can to avoid the flare ups that we’ve seen in other places.”This makes Toronto the only Canadian city other than Windsor to officially mandate face coverings in indoor public spaces, though similar measures have been or are presently being considered in Quebec, Alberta and Ottawa.To protect the health and safety of our communities, today, Toronto City Council voted unanimously in favour of requiring masks or face coverings in all enclosed public places as of July 7 to help stop the spread of COVID-19. News release: https://t.co/zUEeTD0NdXpic.twitter.com/eNZsNMbr25— City of Toronto (@cityoftoronto) June 30, 2020What’s in the new bylaw?The new rule will go into effect on July 7, and corresponds with a matching initiative, launched July 2, to make face coverings mandatory on public transit. (There is a plan to circulate one million non-medical masks to transit users, with a particular focus on those from low-income and marginalized communities.) It’s all part of an effort to reduce the spread of the coronavirus as we wade further into Stage 2 of the pandemic.Though mayor Tory has announced the city won’t be aggressively enforcing the new bylaw, the city solicitor told CBC that she anticipates the corresponding fine to be “in the ballpark” of $750 to $1,000 — a lot of money, for not wearing a mask.There are a couple of exceptions, as there are to any rule. Those who cannot wear masks for medical reasons, as well as children under the age of two, will not be required to cover their faces. Similarly, residents will be allowed to temporarily remove masks while having meals, receiving services or doing fitness activities. The bylaw also won’t apply to apartment buildings, condos, childcare facilities, schools, or unenclosed areas like patios.Watch: How effective are homemade face masks? Story continues below.Why does this matter?The decision comes on the heels of a new study released on Thursday in Proceedings of the Natural Academy of the United States of America, which learned that mandatory face masks helped prevent more than 78,000 infections over a month’s span in Italy, and more than 66,000 during a three-week span in New York City. Basically, bylaws like the one just introduced in Toronto have been scientifically proven to prevent interhuman transmission of the virus.If you can recall — and who has any sense of time, nowadays — it was just back in May when over 100 of the world’s most prominent academics signed an open letter asking the government to mandate face coverings in public spaces.After an international cross-disciplinary review of scientific research conducted by 19 experts, they called on governments to mandate the masks in all public places, as well as business leaders to require their employees to wear them even where it wasn’t required by local law. “I think the biggest thing with COVID now that shapes all of this guidance on masks is that we can’t tell who’s infected,” infectious disease specialist Peter Chin-Hong told UCSF. “You can’t look in a crowd and say, oh, that person should wear mask. There’s a lot of asymptomatic infection, so everybody has to wear a mask.”A refresher on the benefits to wearing masksSince the beginning of the pandemic, masks have been a political flashpoint in the national conversation about how to stay safe. At first, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially discouraged people from wearing them, but later circled back on their recommendations after more evidence had surfaced.“It is a simple, inexpensive measure that can have a significant impact in reducing the spread of the virus,” Dr. Simone Wildes, an infectious disease physician at South Shore Health in Massachusetts, told ABC News. “We have to remember if we don’t take these measures there will be more cases and more deaths.”Insightful: Japan doesn’t even require people to wear masks. Yet people do it anyway because people respect each other and put protecting public safety as paramount. As result, here is Japan versus the US and even Europe. If you can barely see Japan, it’s at the bottom. #covid19https://t.co/5nL4xgMJIxpic.twitter.com/ohJD2ohbww— Eric Feigl-Ding (@DrEricDing) June 28, 2020The benefits to wearing masks in public are manifold: accumulating evidence has found they can both prevent you from spreading respiratory droplets to others, in the event that you’re infected, and might prevent some of the viral particles from worming their way into your nose and mouth, though that argument has been much shakier than the former.Many people are still out there who are asymptomatic, and don’t realize they’re infected by the virus. Making masks mandatory for everyone helps to reduce the risk of transmission in these scenarios. If everyone takes precautions, everyone is safer.RELATED 3 Ways To Make Your Own Face Mask At Home The Questions We All Have About Wearing Face Masks There's ASMR For Your COVID-19 Anxiety Now, Because Of Course When And Why Should You Wear A Face Mask In Public?
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Public safety task force tackles violent crimes on Calgary streets
Calgary's newly-formed public safety task force met for a second time on Friday.
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Social housing projects in the works for C.D.N.-N.D.G., St-Michel
Two lots have been purchased in the Côte-des-Neiges—Notre-Dame-de-Grâce borough to develop social and community housing.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
NHL’s complicated new CBA not done yet
These aren’t the best of times for thrashing out the fine print of a new collective bargaining agreement — and thus it is taking extra effort for the NHL and its players association to sign. So it now appears the multi-year deal, which is tied to this summer’s hoped-for playoff tournament and COVID-19 issues, might […]
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Toronto Sun
COVID-19 budget projections show grimmer story for City of Edmonton
City council has received an updated report that shows the financial cost of COVID-19 to Edmonton is worse than first projected in April. They'll review the report on Monday.
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Three policing reviews. Over 250 recommendations. No action. This group won’t stop until that changes
A coalition of Black-led organizations is calling for recommendations from the Independent Street Checks Review, the Police and Community Engagement Review (PACER) and the Report of the Independent Police Oversight Review to be adopted and implemented immediately.
1 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
RCMP investigating homicide of 30-year-old man in Houston, B.C.
Officers responded to a report of a man in medical distress inside a home and found him suffering from significant injuries.
1 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Three dead after float plane crashes near Edmonton airport: Mounties
The RCMP say it’s believed no one else was aboard the aircraft.
1 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Report calls out ‘systemic’ failings in Canada’s long-term care system
The report released Friday by the Royal Society of Canada found the pandemic was a ``shock wave'' that exposed many long-standing deficiencies in the system.
1 h
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Ethics commissioner launches investigation into Trudeau, $900M WE Charity contract
Ethics critics for both the Conservatives and the NDP had written to Commissioner Mario Dion seeking a review of whether the prime minister contravened the Conflict of Interest Act.
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Police, firefighter statues vandalized with paint outside Calgary city hall
Statues of a Calgary firefighter and police officer outside city hall were vandalized with paint.
1 h
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Federal Ethics Commissioner investigates Trudeau's ties to WE Charity over $912-million student volunteer grant
OTTAWA – The federal Ethics Commissioner will investigate the links between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and WE Charity, the organization with close ties to the Trudeau family to which the government outsourced an over $900-million student volunteer grant program last week. According to letters received by both the Conservatives and the NDP on Friday afternoon, the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner Mario Dion says he has advised Justin Trudeau that he will be opening an investigation into many facets of the WE Charity deal. “In your letter, you allege that, given the existence of Mr. Trudeau’s close family ties with WE Charity and the outsourcing of this project to the charity over the federal public service or another volunteer organization, Mr. Trudeau afforded preferential treatment to WE Charity in contravention … of the Conflict of Interest Act,” Dion wrote in a July 3 letter to NDP MP Charlie Angus. “I have considered your request and am of the view that it satisfies the requirements set out in … the Act. I am therefore commencing an examination.” WE Charity co-founder said PMO 'called' to award $900M student-grant program, contradicting Trudeau WE Charity pulls out of $912-million contract with Trudeau government Last week, Trudeau announced that the government was outsourcing the $912-million Canada Student Service Grant to WE Charity, an organization who has close ties to the prime minister and his family. Trudeau had regularly attended or hosted “WE Day”, the organization’s annual stadium-sized rally for Canadian youth, up until 2017. His wife, Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, is currently a “WE ambassador and ally”, hosts a podcast with the organization and attended a WE Day event with her daughter and the prime minister’s mother, Margaret Trudeau, in London in March. After a week of controversy, Trudeau announced Friday that WE Charity had pulled out of the deal. For example, the National Post reported on Monday that WE Charity — which has close ties to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his family — had received only sole-source contracts from the federal government in the last three years. Tuesday, video obtained by the National Post showed WE Charity co-founder saying that the prime minister’s office had called his organization directly asking it to “help implement” the Canada Student Service Grant. This is the sixth time the Office of the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner has investigated Trudeau’s behaviour since he was elected prime minister in 2015. Two of those times, the Commissioner concluded that Trudeau had violated federal ethics laws. More to come. 
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
Suspect sought by Hamilton police in attempted murder at Corktown Park
A 22-year-old woman was stabbed multiple times during an attack in Hamilton's Corktown Park early Friday morning, according to police.
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Bedlam erupts in Arkansas eatery over social distancing
A chaotic melee was unleashed inside an Arkansas restaurant over social distancing amid the coronavirus, according to a report. The wild fracas was caught on camera when a woman donning a face mask confronted patrons who stood too close to her, according to bystanders inside the Saltgrass Steak House in Little Rock. Seth Crews, who […]
1 h
Toronto Sun
Town of Wasaga Beach to send strongly-worded letter to Premier Ford
The Town of Wasaga Beach plans on sending Premier Doug Ford a letter next week, saying the province “mismanaged” the re-opening of Wasaga Beach Provincial Park, which attracted throngs of people on Canada Day. The town’s mayor, Nina Bifolchi, said the letter is also addressed to Ontario Parks and the Ontario Provincial Police, which respectively […]
2 h
Toronto Sun
Charges laid following March shooting in Clearview, Ont., believed to have left 1 dead
Provincial police believe the shooting resulted in the death of Rohan Rose, a 36-year-old Toronto man, who was found with gunshot wounds outside of Humber River Hospital by Toronto police.
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