Man suffers life-threatening injuries in Hamilton Road crash involving stolen motorcycle: police

It happened around 7:30 p.m. at Hamilton Road and Elm Street, police say.
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Coronavirus: Latest developments in the Greater Toronto Area on September 22
Here is a roundup of the latest developments on the coronavirus pandemic in the Greater Toronto Area for Tuesday.
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75-year-old tractor driver dead after fall at Brant County farm
Investigators believe the man attempted to re-enter his moving vehicle when he fell.
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Alberta RCMP investigating after Red Deer anti-racism rally gets violent
The RCMP said a "second incident," which they did not explain in the news release, was brought to their attention a day later and they are asking any witnesses to come forward.
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Grand Theatre to glow red for national event raising awareness for pandemic-hit live event industry
The London landmark is among those across the country taking part in Day of Visibility for the Live Event Community.
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Coronavirus: 6 active cases in Peterborough area are under age 50
Peterborough Public Health reports 111 cases total in its jurisdiction on Tuesday.
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Site preparation to start this fall on dual-purpose aviation museum, conference centre in Kelowna
The building will be located beside Kelowna International Airport, and will feature several amenities, including two hangars dedicated to heritage aircraft displays.
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Winnipeg long-term care home reports Manitoba’s 19th coronavirus death
The death, which hasn't been confirmed by provincial health officials, is the 19th COVID-19 death reported in Manitoba since March.
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These Dawson College students missed out on a live gallery show. So they went virtual.
When the arts students took their year-end exhibit to a virtual gallery, thousands of eager guests rushed to see the immersive 3D space, complete with floating avatars, virtual drinks and a bevy of interactive features The post These Dawson College students missed out on a live gallery show. So they went virtual. appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Driver in life-threatening condition after crash in Brampton
Emergency crews were called to Airport Road near Williams Parkway just before 3:20 p.m. on Tuesday with reports of a crash between a truck and a car.
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AHS notified after Langdon-area residents voice concerns about large gathering over the weekend
A local restaurant is defending a party held at the establishment following a complaint regarding physical distancing.
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Decision on potential privatization of Cannabis NB coming once government sworn in: Higgs
'An update on the Cannabis NB RFP process will be available after the new government is sworn in,' Blaine Higgs said in a statement.
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Guelph police will continue to deploy downtown resource officers after pilot project ends
The pilot project has seen five Guelph police officers dedicated to the city's downtown core since April.
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Alberta seeks assurance that RCMP will comply with law allowing people to access abuse history of domestic partners
EDMONTON — Alberta’s Justice Minister has appealed to Bill Blair, the Liberal public safety minister, to ensure the Royal Canadian Mounted Police comply with the province’s Clare’s Law that allows a person to find out if their romantic partner has a history of domestic abuse. In a letter written to the public safety minister, Kaycee Madu, Alberta’s justice minister, asked Blair to work with the RCMP following the “extremely disappointing” news that police in Saskatchewan were not following similar legislation. “We request that you immediately work with the RCMP to revisit any such decisions to ensure they help prevent intimate partner violence by complying with Alberta’s Clare’s Law,” Madu’s letter says. Madu, in an interview with the  National Post,  said he wanted Blair to know that tackling domestic violence is a priority of the UCP government, so it concerns him when he hears there’s a risk of enforceability. “It’s a serious concern for us,” Madu said. In Saskatchewan, the first province to introduce a “Clare’s Law,” — named after a woman in the United Kingdom who was killed by a former partner who police knew had a history of violence — the RCMP have not followed the provincial law, arguing both before and after its implementation that they’re hamstrung by federal privacy rules. Municipal police are complying. As yet, Clare’s Law has not been put into force in Alberta. It is planned to be proclaimed, and enforceable, in April 2021. When asked by the Post whether it intends to to comply with the province’s legislation, a spokesman from the RCMP’s Alberta division said in an email the police agency is supportive of the law and they have working groups looking at the legislation. Saskatchewan government says RCMP declining to participate in Clare's Law Alberta introduces legislation allowing access to partner's criminal records Groups question impact new Clare's Law will have in Saskatchewan “The working group will ensure that the application, assessment and disclosure processes are consistent across the province,” the email said. “It would be premature to give any definitive responses until this working group has completed their work.” Introduced in October 2019, Clare’s Law was supposed to have come into effect in Alberta in early 2020 but was derailed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Alberta has, according to the province, the third-highest rates of domestic violence in Canada. Madu’s letter suggests the province is open to working with the RCMP to resolve any privacy issues. The law, as with similar laws in other jurisdiction, means that a person, regardless of gender, may ask police for information about their prospective partner’s past. It also allows for a third party to request this information. The request is assessed by police, who determine whether or not it should be released. The details regulating this process, Madu said, are being worked on. “I am confident that we have taken care of any privacy concerns when developing this law,” said Madu. Mary-Liz Power, a spokesperson for Blair, said in an email that the RCMP is supportive of Clare’s law and is “actively looking into whether any amendments to federal regulations could be proposed that would allow them to participate in Clare’s Law.” “It is critical that the RCMP, as a federal institution, ensures its approach is wide-ranging and harmonious with various provincial frameworks, as well as the overarching federal privacy regime,” Power wrote. There have been a handful of privacy concerns — and more general concerns — raised about such laws and their efficacy. For example, the YWCA Calgary, for example, worried that disclosure of past domestic abuse to a new partner might, inadvertently, reveal the identity of the person who had been previously abused. It also unknown what information might be disclosed under such requests. While a criminal record might be reasonable, critics have wondered about whether or not stayed or dropped charges might be disclosed, too. “If they are serious, if Mr. Blair and the federal government are serious about tackling domestic violence … if that is the case we should be removing any and all obstacles in the way of being able to enforce this law,” Madu said. “We can work with them and sort them out.” • Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter: tylerrdawson You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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COMMENTARY: Canadians want throne speech to focus on current problems, not ‘big picture’ ideas
Justin Trudeau hinted at a throne speech with big ideas. But polling shows Canadians are more focused on fighting the pandemic and its economic effects, Darrell Bricker says.
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Surviving the cut: How to support a child during tryouts
While parents can feel helpless as their children navigate tryouts, the University of Alberta's vice dean for Kinesiology, Sports and Recreation says there are tangible ways to offer support.
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Niagara police charge teen after ‘fabricated’ attempted abduction in Jordan
Police say they were called to the area of King and Nineteenth streets just after 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.
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London, Ont., committee endorses review of name change process prompted by Plantation Road petition
The motion itself was in response to the advocacy of 10-year-old London Lyla Wheeler, who's been pushing for over a year to change the name of Plantation Road.
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Manitoba should implement provincewide mask mandate: Winnipeg mayor
Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman says he would like to see a provincewide mask mandate as COVID-19 cases continue to steadily climb, particularly in the capital.
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Man suffers life-threatening injuries after Brampton collision
Peel police say a truck and a car collided in the Williams Parkway and Airport Road area.
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Families frustrated with lack of answers in recommendations from Northwood review
The report outlines 17 recommendations to help address issues for the future. And while the recommendations include reducing room occupancy it does not specifically recommend getting rid of all shared rooms, but rather creating an infection and prevention control plan with the consideration of shared bedrooms and bathrooms. 
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No excuses for denying education to children with Down syndrome
Like many parents who have children with disabilities, I worried this would happen — that children with Down syndrome might get pushed out of the education system this year.
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Beloved Chinatown bakery Furama to close its doors after more than 30 years in Toronto
In addition to serving pineapple buns and egg tarts, the bakery, at 248 Spadina Ave., was a welcoming meeting space for many.
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Justin Trudeau to address the nation Wednesday on the ‘urgency of fighting COVID-19’
National broadcast will come hours after Trudeau’s minority government delivers a throne speech.
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Getting A Flu Shot Might Not Be Easy This Year — But It's Worth It
Canadian doctors are worried about flu season.We’ve already heard about the concern that a rise in flu cases alongside the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to a “twindemic,” where hospitals are overwhelmed and left without enough space or resources.But there’s another issue that could complicate flu season: vaccine shortages. The shortage isn’t a pressing issue on its own, but when combined with increased demand for the vaccine and a slower vaccination process due to pandemic precautions, it could lead to what the Pediatrics Department of the Ontario Medical Association called a “potentially devastating collision course.”Vaccine shortage is a problem even in non-pandemic years“There’s always a flu vaccine shortage. We don’t ever get as many vaccines as we asked for,” Toronto pediatrician Dr. Dina Kulik told HuffPost Canada. But typically, most of the people who seek out the flu vaccine can find it somewhere, she said.Only 42 per cent of Canadians got the vaccine last year, up from 38 per cent the year before, according to Statistics Canada. Many people prefer not to get vaccines that aren’t mandatory, Kulik said, and many don’t think of the flu as serious.“Some people think the flu is a mild illness, and they’re not aware that it can cause significant illness or even death,” she said. An average of 3,500 people in Canada die from the flu every year. This year, there’s significantly more interestThis year, there seems to be unprecedented interest in getting the flu vaccine, according to Ryan Doherty. He’s the president and founder of Empower Health, which provides localized information about healthcare providers across Canada.One of the tools the organization offers is designed to show users where they can find flu shots in their area. Because vaccines won’t become available until mid-October, the site is currently letting people sign up to receive alerts once there are vaccines available in their area. Major pharmacy brands, such as Rexall and Shoppers Drug Mart, are also encouraging people to sign up for alerts online.“There are a lot people looking for flu shots now,” Doherty told HuffPost Canada. He doesn’t have specific data yet, since they just launched the notification feature last week, but the demand appears to be earlier and stronger than in previous years.Watch: How to protect yourself from the flu. Story continues after video.“Internationally, there is a trend in Australia and other other areas where there was a significant uptick in terms of people trying to get flu shots earlier,” he said. Australia ordered a record number of flu vaccines and reported just 36 confirmed flu deaths between January and July. The year before, that number was 383.A poll conducted by Shopper’s Drug Mart found that 60 per cent of Canadians say they plan to get the flu shot. While that’s more than in previous years, it still leaves a broad part of the population unprotected. Of the people who said they don’t plan on getting the shot, 73 per cent said they “made it through COVID-19,” so weren’t worried about the flu.Like Australia, Canada has also ordered several million more flu shot doses than usual. But doctors and pharmacists are still facing other supply issues.Medical supply shortage“Even if we have flu shot tomorrow, we don’t have enough needles to provide more flu shots,” Kulik said. “There’s already a backorder in Ontario of needles.”The government provides doctors with the vaccine itself, but not with the needles or syringes or masks or gloves used to administer them. Many medical supply companies have simply run out of stock, given the unprecedented demand for PPE this year.Timing is also an important issue when it comes to vaccines. It takes two weeks for the flu shot to build up antibodies, so you’re not fully protected from the flu until two weeks after being vaccinated.Vaccines will likely require appointmentsAnother factor that could complicate this year’s flu season, Doherty said, is that for a lot of people, especially families, vaccines happen alongside regular checkups at the doctor’s office. That isn’t possible this year.“In many cases, as the family doctor sees their patient on a regular basis for for other reasons, they would just offer them the vaccine,” he explained. “Because of COVID, the majority of visits to family doctors are virtual now.”Other people seeking out the flu vaccine might just stop by a pharmacy to get it done in regular years. But the National Advisory Committee on Immunization, which makes recommendations to Health Canada, has suggested that people seeking flu shots at pharmacies will require appointments.But most pharmacies haven’t had appointment-based services in the past, particularly the smaller non-chain stores. “The management might be a bit of a hurdle for some. That will also be another game changer this year,” Doherty said. Pediatricians want a solid vaccine planIn Ontario, doctors are hoping the province will implement a plan to offer large-scale, community-based vaccine clinics. A petition to that effect has been signed by more than 700 people. At least 300 of those are Ontario pediatricians, Kulik among them.Her ideal plan would see vaccinations happen outdoors, maybe in a large tent, heated if necessary. “I envision a clinic that ideally could take place outdoors, where many families can be seen in a day and given the shot,” she said. “We know COVID transmission is less outdoors, and bringing people into a physical location like an office, it’s impossible to maintain distance.”Planning an outdoor clinic is a very time-sensitive endeavour, given that most parts of the country are getting colder. And given the two-week antibody-building period, “it’s important to do it as soon as we can,” she said. “Delaying it is only adding risk.” Ontario’s provincial government hasn’t signed on to such a specific plan, but on Tuesday it did unveil flu precautions that include supplying 700,000 more flu dosages than last year, with priority distribution for people in long-term care homes and hospitals.RELATED COVID-19 Pandemic Poised To Be Canada’s Largest-Ever Vaccination Campaign Is It Coronavirus Or The Flu? How To Spot The Difference The Best Time Of Day To Get The Flu Shot How The Flu Vaccine Can Help You Down The Road
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Drive-thru flu shot clinics a possibility for Peterborough this year
Dr. Rosana Salvaterra said they've been having weekly meetings with healthcare practices to discuss possible solutions, such as outdoor clinics.
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'Canada Is At A Crossroads' As COVID-19 Cases Rise: Dr. Theresa Tam
OTTAWA — There will be a dramatic resurgence of COVID-19 cases in Canada unless people limit contact with others in coming days, the country’s chief public health officer warns.“We don’t want it to go up a giant ski hill,” Dr. Theresa Tam said Tuesday as she described the potential for a sharp upward curve.The Public Health Agency of Canada released its latest modelling Tuesday, predicting up to 155,795 cases and up to 9,300 deaths by early October if the current trajectory of the epidemic continues.The message throughout the presentation was clear: everyone needs to act now to limit their contacts or things will get worse.“Canada is at a crossroads and individual action to reduce contact rates will decide our path,” said a presentation deck released Tuesday.RELATED Shaming Young People As Party Animals Ignores Their Actual COVID-19 Risks First It Was Toilet Paper. Now, Paper Towels Are In Short Supply. Will There Be Another Lockdown? Not In The Way You Might Think Ontario Must Address Long-Term Care Staffing Crisis As Cases Surge: Unions Federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu echoed that advice as she urged people to think carefully before accepting invitations to social gatherings.“All of us have the future in our hands,” she said Tuesday during a media briefing in Ottawa.She also said, however, that the spread of the novel coronavirus is not the same across the country, or even across single provinces, so determining whether restrictions need tightening demands a “surgical approach.”Meanwhile, Canada has now committed more than $1 billion to buy doses of COVID-19 vaccines after securing a fifth deal with Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline Tuesday.Procurement Minister Anita Anand said Tuesday that Canada has a deal in place to buy up to 72 million doses of their experimental vaccine candidate, which is just starting the second of three trial phases this month.In all, Canada has committed $1 billion to buy at least 154 million doses of vaccines from five different companies, and most of that money will not be refunded even if the vaccines never get approved.Watch: Why Canada’s COVID-19 crisis may result in 1 more lost generation. Story continues below. “We need to make a substantial investment in order to ensure that Canada is well positioned to secure access to the successful vaccine or vaccines,” she said in an interview with The Canadian Press.“The way in which we are doing that is to bet on multiple horses at the same time in order to ensure that as one or more of those horses crosses the finish line, we have access to those vaccines.”Canada has signed deals with Moderna, Pfizer, Novavax, Johnson & Johnson and now Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline, all of which are among some of the most promising vaccines, but none of which have completed all the required clinical trials, or been approved for use in Canada.On Sept. 3, Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline said their vaccine candidate was going to begin Phase 1/2 trials which will test it on 440 individuals. The hope is the vaccine will be ready for the third and final phase of trials by the end of the year, and approved for use in the first half of 2021.Moderna has a vaccine in Phase 3 trials, and Pfizer’s is in a combined Phase 2 and 3 trial. Novavax is in a Phase 2 trial, while Johnson & Johnson is in a Phase 1/2 trial. Most clinical trials have three phases to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine or drug being developed.Each level of trials adds more volunteers on whom the drug is tested, looking for adverse health effects and whether the vaccine does cause a person to develop antibodies that can protect against COVID-19.More antiviral drugs on the way Anand said Canada has also signed an agreement with Gilead Sciences and McKesson Canada to get 150,000 vials of remdesivir, the only antiviral drug that has proven effective at treating patients with COVID-19. Health Canada approved the drug for use on COVID-19 patients at the end of July.The doses will begin arriving at Canadian hospitals this month.Canada has also joined the international vaccine co-operative known as the COVAX Facility, which is bringing together wealthy countries with low- and middle-income countries to collectively invest in doses of vaccines. It has not yet announced how much money it will contribute, a figure that was to have come last week but has been delayed. Anand says Canada remains committed to COVAX and more details will be coming soon.Canada has chosen to participate in both parts of the COVAX program. The first is for any country to join to get access to vaccines, and the second is a fund for wealthy countries to help low-income countries participate. The Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research and the Canadian Society for International Health have both criticized Canada for acting to buy doses of vaccine for itself, hindering efforts to ensure vaccines that are successful are distributed fairly around the world.GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, said Monday that 64 wealthy countries had joined the COVAX Facility, including Canada. The United States has not joined.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 22, 2020.
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Cambridge high school student tests positive for novel coronavirus
A student at a high school in Cambridge is the seventh in the area to test positive for the coronavirus according to the Waterloo Region District School Board.
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Calgary police say 3 suspicious deaths within 24 hours not connected
Calgary police say their resources are stretched after three suspicious deaths in less than 24 hours.
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Police release photo of men in connection with Kitchener shooting
Waterloo Regional Police have released an image of three suspects they are looking to speak with in connection to a recent shooting in Kitchener.
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Dental injuries on the rise thanks to e-scooter use: study by U of A prof
A study led by an University of Alberta professor found the number of injuries to both riders and pedestrians related to e-scooter use has been on the rise.
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Ottawa signs deals for potential vaccines amid warnings that second COVID-19 wave could be worse than the first
Canada’s chief public health officer warns a rising wave of COVID-19 infections could grow worse than the first surge as Ottawa buys millions of potential vaccines and stocks up on an antiviral drug.
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Hotel unions worry about cuts to cleaning visits during pandemic
Should hotels be cleaning guests’ rooms during their stay? Workers’ representatives say yes, but the industry and an epidemiologist suggest otherwise.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Ricin-laced letter sent to Trump used same insult in Twitter account in Pascale Ferrier's name
Another reply to a tweet on the same account ended a comment with the hashtag #killtrump.
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Experts say second wave will bring empty shelves, but not because of panic buying
Experts say a second wave of COVID-19 will likely see consumers plagued by shortages -- but this time stemming from 'lifestyle changes' rather than panic buying.
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Trudeau to address the nation over coronavirus pandemic after Wednesday’s throne speech
Trudeau is slated to speak at 6:30 p.m. ET. Global News will broadcast his speech live.
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Edmonton police picks AtHoc emergency preparedness system from BlackBerry, Telus
BlackBerry acquired AtHoc four years ago as it was strategically shifting emphasis from smartphones towards secure communications for organizations.
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PM Trudeau to address nation after throne speech focused on COVID-19 response
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government will be presenting a COVID-19 response-focused speech from the throne on Wednesday, pivoting from a desire to kick off the new session of Parliament with bold new economic and social recovery plans due to the looming threat of a fall surge in the deadly virus' spread.
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Remote learning to continue for most of Queen’s students come winter
Queen's University has announced it will be continuing to deliver most of its classes remotely in the winter term.
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COVID-19: Trudeau to address nation Wednesday night to warn of situation's urgency
OTTAWA — With COVID-19 cases creeping up in several parts of the country, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will address the nation Wednesday night, warning of the urgency in preventing a second wave. Broadcasters have been asked for airtime for the address, which is expected to come at around 6:30 p.m. Eastern time. A spokesperson from the prime minister said the address will speak to the need to take the virus seriously. “The Prime Minister will address Canadians directly on the urgency of fighting COVID 19, as we face down the prospect of a second wave of the virus,” reads the statement. “He will also give a summary of the government’s plans in the Throne Speech to fight the virus and build our economic recovery.” After proroguing parliament for weeks, Trudeau is set to reveal a new legislative agenda in a throne speech set for Wednesday afternoon, which will then be reinforced with his address later that evening. Cases of COVID-19 are rising across the country, with several provinces seeing numbers they have not seen since earlier this year, when the nation was in lockdown. Twitter: RyanTumilty Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com
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Dads tackle sex offender accused of spying on girl in bathroom at Cracker Barrel
The suspect, who is a registered sex offender, allegedly peeked under a stall in the women's bathroom at a Cracker Barrel in North Carolina.
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10 new coronavirus cases in Saskatchewan, two linked to Saskatoon outbreak
The total case count in Saskatchewan rose to 1,824 after 10 new coronavirus cases were reported on Tuesday.
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Waterloo’s top doc issues plea for people to only get COVID-19 tests when necessary
With area testing facilities running at full steam, Waterloo Region’s top doctor asked anyone without symptoms or a referral to refrain from getting tested.
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Red Deer Anti-Racism Rally Interrupted By Hate Groups, RCMP Investigating
A scheduled anti-racism rally in central Alberta turned violent this weekend, after members of far-right hate groups disrupted it. The event was one of several peaceful conversations across central Alberta towns and cities in recent months about anti-racism and justice.But the conversation in Red Deer never even got started Sunday.Video from the event showed people wearing logos of far-right hate groups disrupting the event, chanting slogans including “all lives matter” and instigating physical scuffles with attendees. Red Deer, AB"Patriots" came in truck loads to attack people who came to attend an organized event on anti-racism.Here's my bf getting punched in the head after serving Pat King a restraining order. Police did nothing.@RCMPAlberta@RachelNotley@antihateca@YYCantiracistpic.twitter.com/jYwfNCmUac— Taylor McNallie (@TaylorMadeYYC) September 21, 2020Anti-racism rally cancelled in Red Deer after hate groups disrupt event. pic.twitter.com/5l3k9eeRXv— CityNews Edmonton (@CityNewsYEG) September 22, 2020Several of the disruptors were seen wearing clothing associated with the Soldiers of Odin, a far-right white supremacist hate group with connections to neo-Nazi movements. In videos from the scene, RCMP are seen standing between the two sides as physical violence breaks out. According to the Red Deer Advocate, nine police cars and around 15 officers were on the scene. Kisha Daniels, one of the event’s scheduled speakers, told CityTV that despite being present, police stood by as violence broke out. “This was a peaceful event that these people crashed and the RCMP allowed the violence to happen,” she said. RELATED Man Charged With Murder As Red Deer Mourns Doctor Killed In Attack Here’s What It’s Like To Organize Against Racism In Alberta’s Heartland My Hometown Is The Epicentre Of Wexit. I Went Back To Find Out Why On Monday, Red Deer RCMP confirmed that no charges were laid following the event and no further investigation was planned. Alberta Justice Minister Kaycee Madu confirmed during a press conference Tuesday, however, that RCMP have now opened an investigation.“I am confident that Albertans overwhelmingly reject the behaviour seen this past Sunday,” he said.  Adora Nwofor, a Black woman from Calgary, has participated in anti-racism demonstrations and conversations across rural Alberta. She told the Red Deer Advocate that the violence from the weekend was unfortunately familiar. “I’ve been all over the province,” she said. “It seems like this is elevated from all the other protests I’ve been to … There has been verbal violence and incidents of people pushing.” Last week, an anti-racism demonstrator in the nearby town of Ponoka was struck by a passing car. Organizers of the demonstration allege the collision was a targeted act.“Canada must do better”On Monday and Tuesday, municipal, provincial and federal officials condemned the violence. Red Deer Mayor Tara Veer said in a statement Tuesday, that while the city supports free expression, she is concerned by increased social tensions.“We unequivocally denounce violence and racism,” she said. “The City recognizes that social tensions are extremely high across our country as a result of the pandemic, economy, political polarity, and competing worldviews. However, as a community it is imperative we pull together, and not apart, during adverse times. We cannot allow the actions of a few to characterize our city.”Alberta NDP leader Rachel Notley said politicians must commit to being anti-racist. Recent video footage of racist hate groups in Red Deer, intimidating and threatening anti-racist activists, are disturbing.We, as politicians, and as a society, must act with intention to fight racism and to end racism. We must be anti-racist.#ableg— Rachel Notley (@RachelNotley) September 22, 2020Racism shows up in our justice system, it shows up on our school grounds and post-secondary institutions, it shows up on our streets and in our communities, and it is sustained every time we fail to take action to fight it.— Rachel Notley (@RachelNotley) September 22, 2020Alberta Minister of Culture, Multiculturalism and Status of Women Leela Aheer said she was “deeply disturbed” by the events.I’m deeply disturbed by the events that occurred in Red Deer. I strongly condemn any threats of violence against people that are participating in peaceful assemblies. Attempts to intimidate, coerce, or attack individuals expressing their Charter rights is an attack on democracy. https://t.co/epxqpEOUOW— Leela Sharon Aheer (@LeelaAheer) September 22, 2020Federal Minister of Families, Children and Social Development Ahmed Hussen said officials in positions of leadership must “do better.”“On issues around racism and discrimination, and I think it’s important to the vast majority of Canadians are now demanding that we do better in positions of leadership,” he told reporters during an unrelated event Tuesday. “Many Canadians, Black, Indigenous and people of colour experience discrimination as a lived reality and for them — Canada has to do better.”
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