Lakefield Park beach remains unsafe due to bacteria levels: Peterborough health unit
Peterborough Public Health says Lakefield Park beach is unsafe due to high levels of bacteria.
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Celebrity news: ‘Entourage’ star accused of sexual assault; Michael Jackson channel coming to SiriusXM; Banksy’s work scrubbed from London subway
Also, Lee Greenwood hits No. 1 on the charts with a song released in 1984.
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Maple Leafs part ways with longtime sports reporter Paul Hendrick
Hendrick, known around the Scotiabank Arena as “Henny” has been with Leafs Nation Network since its early days, when it was known as Leafs TV starting in 1995.
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More staff will be added to COVID-19 testing centres in Montreal
Public-health authorities working to improve access after calling for anyone who worked in or was in a bar after July 1 to be tested.
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Most Thames Valley parents want kids back in class in September: TVDSB survey
According to a survey by Thames Valley District School Board, most parents are in favour of sending their children back to school in September.
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‘Survivor’ pulled from fall TV schedule as COVID-19 continues to halt production
The show's producers 'are continuing to work with officials in Fiji on the appropriate time to start production.'
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P.E.I. reports no new coronavirus cases on Wednesday after recent clusters
Dr. Heather Morrison said Wednesday more than 1,300 tests have been done since a health-care worker in the emergency department and a patient in the hospital were identified as positive on Sunday.
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We Really Need To Talk About WE's White-Saviour Problem
A professor surveyed the classroom of eager students and asked us, “How many of you are here because of a Free the Children trip?” Hands shot up, mine alongside them. I was 18 years old, and it was the first week of my undergraduate degree in international development. Years of involvement with the WE Movement had taught me and thousands of similarly mobilized youth that all it would take to change the world was volunteerism and good intentions.At the time, WE Charity, formerly known as Free the Children, and its sister company, the for-profit social enterprise Me to We, had been seen as a leader in Canada’s youth engagement sector. Few stopped to question whether their international programming lived up to expectations in contributing to ethical, sustainable change.That changed in recent weeks. News broke about a questionable federal government contract, followed by an ethics investigation into speaking fees paid to members of the Trudeau family. Former WE employees shared accounts of alleged mistreatment of staff, racism within the organization and fraud in international operations. As a former program participant whose perspective has since been changed by critical education and experience, I was relieved to see that the world is taking a closer look at the WE movement. Yet, even if WE were to transform its contracts, conditions and culture, I believe there would still be a deeper underlying issue at hand. WE partners with 18,000 schools and has engaged a million youth to date in their massive WE Day events. Within their expansive programming, you’ll find consistent encouragement to participate in international volunteer trips through Me to We.In 2012, I was in Rajasthan, India alongside a group of other keen young Canadians, ready to change the world with Me To We. Although our group was sponsored by a corporation, the three-week trip would have normally cost around $5,000 per participant.We were told that we’d be contributing to the building of a school in a rural community. In reality, we spent the first week moving a pile of bricks from one side of the work site to the other, the second week moving them back, and the third week painting some walls the wrong colour. We were given busywork — and fair enough. I wouldn’t trust unskilled teenagers to play a key role in building schools in my community, either.At one point on our trip, we were brought to the house of a local woman to assist with home repairs. She smiled at us warily as we smoothed mud over the already well-maintained walls of her house. This performative task was clearly more for our own experience than it was for the benefit of local stakeholders.This work was continually framed by our Me To We facilitators as integral to changing the world.I’m not alone in feeling that a voluntourism experience fell short of its intended impact. Volunteers with other organizations have shared stories of messing up a construction project so badly that local workers had to redo it each night, schools being built without any sustainability plans, and feeling that they actually slowed down progress on local projects with their lack of skills and knowledge.Some may argue that the benefit of voluntourism lies in the perspective change of the volunteers, but I question why we need to become a tourist to the poverty of others to confront our own privilege.Even if my group had taken on more intensive work, this trip still would have contributed much more to our own personal development as volunteers than it would have to community change. Local tradespeople could carry out construction for a fraction of the cost of our trip’s price. Some may argue that the benefit of voluntourism lies in the perspective change of the volunteers, but I question why we need to become a tourist to the poverty of others to confront our own privilege. A simplistic modelWhen I came home from India, Me to We seemed less concerned with me going forward and pursuing more impactful change than they were in getting me to spend more money. I was soon emailed about purchasing another volunteer trip. This type of encouragement seems to work, as I travelled to India with an individual who had been on four Me to We trips.Although Me to We states that, “Engaging directly with partner communities and projects is far more impactful than just giving money,” I believe that much more impact could have been created by directly donating the money spent on trip costs to local community organizations who understand their own issues and can propose their own solutions.The proceeds from Me to We in part go to supporting WE Charity, which runs the program WE Villages. This development model centres around providing the five pillars of water, education, health, food security and opportunity. The danger of breaking development down into a simplistic model is that it can perpetuate stereotypes about developing countries as rural, agrarian and poor, and give the impression that with simple solutions, such as building a school, a community can sustainably lift itself out of poverty. It fails to delve into the nuances and barriers caused by colonialism, governance structures, conflict, climate change and a complex global economic system, or acknowledge constantly evolving urban development, innovation and social change.In my experience, WE does not do enough to show their largely privileged program participants the role that Western countries have played in causing global poverty (ahem, colonialism) and continuing to benefit from it. Following my Me to We trip, I went into my undergraduate degree thinking that I would go forward to help save the world, perpetuating a problematic concept of white saviourism. I had to learn to step back and acknowledge that supporting social change isn’t about centring ourselves in the process.We have a problem here, and it’s not just with WE. It’s with how our society chooses to selectively view and contribute to local and global issues. If you are turning away from Black Lives Matter, Indigenous sovereignty, poverty and homelessness in Canada, but are paying thousands of dollars to go on an international volunteer trip, the outcomes may be more self-serving than impactful. I get it because I’ve done it — it’s easier to go on an exotic trip where you do a bit of work, tour around, and then get to upload your pictures to social media. It’s easier to view the problems of others as simpler than our own. But easy isn’t intentional, or impactful, or ethical, or right. Let’s do the harder work to untangle the deeper, systemic issues at play. And unless there are some major organizational changes, we will be doing it without WE.Note: HuffPost’s previous owner, AOL, sponsored and participated in WE Charity events and Free The Children trips.RELATED As An Indigenous Mountie For 17 Years, I Became Numb To The Casual Racism Trudeau Faces Ethics Investigation Over WE Charity Contract What Academic Streaming Calls Fairness, Ontario's Black Students Know As Racism
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Bloc Quebecois Leader Blanchet denies anonymous allegation against him
Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet is denying an anonymous allegation against him made in a Facebook post.
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Microsoft jettisons dozens of full-time MSN jobs in favour of artificial intelligence
The move comes six weeks after the Redmond, Wash.-based technology giant told about 50 news production contractors they would not be kept on by MSN beyond June 30.
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Competitive eaters are 8 hot dogs away from the human limit, study says
Competitive eaters are nearing the human limit for the number of hot dogs that can be consumed in 10 minutes, according to a new study that says the threshold for humans is around 83.
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Transport truck flipped over near Moncton airport
Police spokesperson Sgt. David MacDonnell says a male and a female, believed to be on the truck, sustained minor injuries from the accident.
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Several children injured by mystery substance at Mission Spray Park
Several parents in Mission, B.C., are concerned after their kids were hurt by a mystery substance at a spray park.
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Kelowna RCMP investigating downtown assault on woman
'RCMP credit the woman for her strong will, as she managed to free and defend herself.'
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Toddler attacked by pit bull celebrates birthday with surgeon who rebuilt her face
The incredible procedure required Dr. Rachel Ruotolo to shave a piece of Alessia's rib and cartilage to rebuild her nose.
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Toronto Raptor Fred VanVleet joins initiative for people to support local business amid COVID-19
"I think it’s just important to keep encouraging people to spend with their local businesses." Fred VanVleet said.
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New Brunswick reports 1 new case of COVID-19 on Wednesday
There are now 168 people in the province who have had a confirmed case of COVID-19.
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Ivanka Trump’s Goya promo unleashes a can of jokes — and corruption claims
'If it's Goya, it has to be good,' Ivanka Trump wrote in a tweet backing the brand, which faces a boycott from the president's critics.
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ViacomCBS severs ties with Nick Cannon over anti-Semitic remarks
'We are deeply troubled that Nick has failed to acknowledge or apologize for perpetuating anti-Semitism, and we are terminating our relationship with him,' the company said.
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Two presumed COVID-19 cases at Nunavut mine may be territory's first infections
Nunavut is reporting two presumptive cases of COVID-19 at an iron mine on the northern tip of Baffin Island.
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Women charged in drug seizures at Pearson airport
More than $1.2 million in suspected cocaine was seized.
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Hamilton Police release video of truck fire suspect
Hamilton Police have released surveillance video of a suspected wanted in a truck fire at a home on the East Mountain.
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Winnipeg’s summer a ‘perfect 10’ this year, says Environment Canada climatologist
Winnipeggers love to complain about the city's often unpredictable weather, but one Environment Canada climatologist says the city is experiencing ideal summer weather.
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Single new coronavirus case reported in Waterloo Region
There are now 50 active COVID-19 cases in Waterloo Region.
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Workers can return to offices, but at 25 per cent capacity
Office employees will be able to return to work starting Sunday, but one out of four desks will be empty.
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Quebec office buildings can gradually reopen with coronavirus measures in place starting Saturday
The province still strongly recommends working from home when possible as the coronavirus pandemic continues.
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Canuck halts Florida skinny-dipping spree via CCTV
A young Florida woman who loves to swim in the nude found herself in some legal trouble thanks to her Canadian neighbour’s security setup. Capri Wiedemann, 22 was arrested for trespassing and burglary after allegedly repeatedly going skinny-dipping at her neighbour’s house, according to NBC2 News. Wiedemann apparently thought nobody was home and nobody would […]
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Toronto Sun
Apple wins big EU court case over $15 billion in taxes
The EU Commission had claimed in 2016 that Apple had struck an illegal tax deal with Irish authorities that allowed it to pay extremely low rates.
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Schools reopening may lead to outbreaks, but we can’t afford to keep them closed: experts
Increased community transmission is expected when schools reopen, but experts say that's not necessarily a reason to keep them closed.
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Guelph Public Library’s Stage 3 reopening plans to take a couple weeks
Guelph will be allowed to enter Stage 3 of the province's reopening plan on Friday, which allows libraries to reopen all on-site services.
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Ontario reports 102 new cases of COVID-19, 9 new deaths
Ontario is reporting 102 new cases of COVID-19 and nine new deaths related to the virus on Wednesday. The total number of cases now stands at 37,052, which includes 2,732 deaths and 32,920 cases marked as resolved. The number of resolved cases grew by 135 today, outpacing the number of new cases. The number of […]
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Toronto Sun
Several Toronto police officers suspended amid ‘very active’ investigation into tow truck corruption case
Toronto police would not confirm the names of the officers who have been suspended with pay, citing the ongoing investigation.
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Teens find new way to nab pandemic booze: Dress up as grannies with masks
There’s a long history of underage teenagers finding novel ways to score alcohol but the pandemic has some taking things to a new level. Some have taken to dressing up as elderly grandmothers wearing COVID-19 face masks and they’re going viral on social media platform TikTok. “Shoulder tapping” — the process of asking someone to […]
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Toronto Sun
Gender Reveals Look A Bit Different When They're For A Non-Binary Teen
Typically, a person wouldn’t be able to eat cake at their own gender reveal party, due to the fact that they would still be in utero.But a recent gender-reveal party in Akron, Ohio was a little different, because it was for a non-binary 17-year-old.Photographer Love Gwaltney posted a beautiful photo series to Facebook in order to alert her friends and family to her child’s transition. The first few photos appear to be from a traditional gender reveal: she and her husband Brandon are wearing blue and pink, he’s caressing her pregnant belly, and they’re standing near a cake topped with a big question mark in pink and blue sprinkles. But the surprise isn’t what’s in the cake, it’s who’s in the big cardboard box behind them. In the next photo, out jumps their 17-year-old, who’s ready to reintroduce himself to the world as a non-binary trans-masculine boy named Grey.“We wanted to announce that we got it wrong 17 years ago when we told the world we were having a little girl,” Gwaltney wrote. “We’d like to introduce you to our SON, Grey.”Grey, Gwaltney said, “is much like any other 17 year old nerdy boy” in that “he stays up way too late gaming, hates showering and eats too much junk food.”She added: “No, we’re not buying him a lifted truck. Yes, we will be buying him some new clothes.”Grey came out to his mom and stepdad Brandon a few months ago, Gwaltney told HuffPost Canada. The family wasn’t sure how they wanted to address his transition to the wider world and their friends. Grey seemed a little nervous, so his parents suggested a gender-reveal party to add some levity. When Love and Brandon floated the idea, Grey was excited, both parents said.The timing just happened to coincide with Gwaltney’s latest pregnancy. “I’m in a few pregnancy groups and kept seeing gender reveals,” she said. “I knew this would be a fun tongue-in-cheek way to announce.”Grey enjoyed a pink-and-blue cake, the colour of the transgender flag, in what looks like an incredibly wholesome family backyard party.Before your baby is born, their sex is one of the only things you know about them — but focusing too much on it can be limiting, Gwaltney wrote in her post.“Sometimes, we force these expected characteristics based off biological sex, and *gasp* we’ve gotten it wrong,” she said. “Sometimes that child disassociates who they are with the body they possess... Other times, that child grows up feeling like a completely different person, and if you’re really lucky, they open up and tell you the truth, no matter how scary or daunting that could be.”Brandon Gwaltney, Love’s husband and Grey’s stepdad, explained that as parents, they don’t want everything in their kids’ lives to be dictated by their gender. “One big reason we didn’t reveal the sex of our last was to avoid getting hyper masculine or overly feminine gifts,” he told HuffPost. They opted for clothing and decoration in greens, browns, and corals, and decorated with forest animals, which Brandon said are cute, but “didn’t scream boy or girl.”Parenting has helped keep them informed about gender and identity in ways they might not have been otherwise, he also said.“We’ve always been very open and supportive so they knew they could come to us with any feelings or insecurities they had regarding what they were going through,” Gwaltney said. “We never wanted them to feel alone.”“Balancing support and guidance is a constant battle, as I’m sure any parent can say.”They’ve encountered the odd troll here and there, they said, but the vast majority of the messages they’ve received from strangers have been positive.“I’ve gotten so many messages from transgender people telling me their story,” Love told HuffPost. “Grey is happy that so many trans and LGBTQ+ youth and allies are seeing it.”The coming-out process is still hard, even now, she said. “Grey had a few friends turn on him, and it was hard,” she said. “But he has the support of a loving family.”She said she’d urge other parents of trans and non-binary kids not to look at their coming out as a loss.“You’re not losing a daughter or a son, they’re just evolving into the best version of themselves,” she said.She also said a parent’s job is to support and affirm their children.“My husband and I have a saying: We’d rather support our kids no matter what, and they later change their mind, than to not support them, and have to spend the rest of our lives knowing we failed them,” she said.And as for the baby she’s carrying — she and her husband have decided not to find out the sex. They haven’t done that for their other children, she said, and they don’t intend to start now.RELATED Even The 'Inventor' Of Gender-Reveal Parties Thinks They're Ridiculous Coming Out Is Hard Enough For Kids. Here’s How You Can Support Them. Fredericton Dad Gives Master Class In Supporting Your Trans Kid Kids Are Taking This Time To Express Gender In New And Creative Ways WATCH: HOW TO BE AN AFFIRMING PARENT
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Winnipeg police to release details on man who lured child online
Winnipeg police say they will release details on a child luring investigation Wednesday.
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U.S. to impose travel bans on Huawei employees, other Chinese companies: Pompeo
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made the announcement a day after the British government said it would ban Huawei from its 5G networks over concerns that sensitive data could be compromised by the China and the Chinese Communist Party.
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How To Avoid Burnout When You're Parenting A Child With Special Needs
  Tilley Creary has really come to understand stress, these past few months. The Toronto-based married mother is parenting two boys, ages eight and 10, the youngest of whom has Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and would typically have language and communications supports through school. In pre-pandemic times, he also had one-on-one support with a dedicated educational assistant (EA). But since the shelter-in-place directive due to COVID-19, there has been no school structure and no professional help. Creary’s youngest son is “the happiest and most loving kid you’ll ever meet,” Creary told HuffPost Canada. But the change to his daily schedule has been difficult for him to grasp. The fact that his specialized school supports are once again up in the air (as they are at the end of every academic year), is an extra worry for his mom and dad.While every Canadian parent currently has anxieties around the uncertainties of childcare, schooling and the upcoming fall term, for those who have kids with special needs, the pandemic can make the challenges even more overwhelming. “I would love for supports to remain in place once they are given,” said Creary. “Every year I have to hope and pray that the EA in my son’s school doesn’t get reassigned or cut out all together.” We’re just hunkered down, the two of us, trying to keep sane. It’s a bit overwhelming at the moment and I worry about the isolation Knox and children like him will endure.” The self-isolation imperative has been weighing heavy on these parents. In Creary’s case, her husband works outside the home, so she’s worried both about his safety and well-being and that of her boys, and she’s doing much of the hands-on work of parenting solo.While both of her sons have needed more from her, with the pandemic creating so much uncertainty, Creary puts in extra efforts to help her child with ASD feel secure.As is typical of children on the spectrum, her eight-year-old is most comfortable with a regular routine; something that is not always possible in these times. He also has sensory sensitivities, so she goes to extra efforts to ensure he’s not overwhelmed, by modifying the family’s activities and using things like noise-cancelling headphones to lessen sound triggers. She has explained to her son repeatedly, why they’re not leaving the house at this time, but it’s a difficult concept for him to grasp“My anxiety is definitely up these days,” she said. “Normally I’m at about a six or seven out of 10, but now I’m a solid nine constantly.” MORE FROM HUFFPOST PARENTS Parents Need To Think Twice About Mermaid Tail Swimsuits Ryan Reynolds Supports Edmonton Boy Who Needs World’s Most Expensive Drug Naya Rivera's Sweetest Moments With Her Son  Creary is not alone in feeling the extra pressure. Parents of kids with a range of developmental and physical disabilities have been reporting challenging and even untenable caregiving situations, since the pandemic took hold. Tanis Miller is a mother of four whose 16-year-old son, Knox, has multiple diagnoses, including quadrispastic cerebral palsy, microcephaly, both cortical visual blindness and optic nerve hypoplasia, bilateral hearing loss and brain damage. Accessing extra support for Knox can be a struggle at the best of times, and now with social distancing restrictions, Miller and her husband are taking care of all of his needs around the clock, without respite.“We spend a good chunk of our day on his basic needs. His feedings takes about a half an hour, three times daily. He gets tastes of soft foods but because he can’t protect his air way and hasn’t figured out how to chew he is mostly tube fed a liquid diet,” said Miller, adding that keeping her son somewhat limber is also a big task. “We do stretches in the morning and the evening, about forty five minutes a time, depending on how cooperative he wants to be.” And then there’s medication, which is administered throughout the day, and the twice-daily care of Knox’s stoma (the hole in his abdomen where his gastric feeding tube apparatus is inserted).Miller is keenly aware of the potential effects of COVID-19 on a medically fragile kid like Knox, and it’s worrying. To keep him safe and healthy, her older children are isolating in their respective locales, and her husband is unable to work from home during the pandemic. All this means that she is taking care of the majority her son’s needs in what is shaping up to be an indefinite period of time.“We’re just hunkered down, the two of us, trying to keep sane. It’s a bit overwhelming at the moment and I worry about the isolation Knox and children like him will endure,” she said. On top of that, “the stress of finances and worrying about my older kids and my husband isn’t doing anything great for my blood pressure,” she adds, even though her goal, each day is “trying to keep focused on the positive.”Dr. Yona Lunsky, Director and Senior Scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, in Toronto, told HuffPost Canada:“Caregiving impacts both mental and physical health. One of the issues is that caregiving is a long-term activity for families and we have major gaps in services and supports, which poses a tremendous stress. Rates of depression and anxiety are higher for these parents.”Dr. Lunsky sees parents of children with disabilities as “incredibly resourceful, creative, and hardy.” However, their own needs ― to restore their energy, connect with their partner or other significant people in their lives and get some downtime alone ― are hard to meet right now.If you are a parenting a child with special needs and worried about burnout, as you well know, there are no magic solutions at this time. Here are some ways, however, to help reduce stress levels: 1. Ask for non-caregiving help within your social circle or from volunteer groupsIn many cases, when a child requires specialized care, another family member or friend will not have the skills and knowledge to participate in caregiving. The pandemic adds an extra layer of complexity, even for those who are equipped to babysit, since we’re all minimizing contact with people outside our household. Even as provincial restrictions loosen, for some families with a medically fragile child, nothing can change until there’s a vaccine for COVID-19.That said, loved ones can step up by doing things like grocery runs, preparing cooked meals and checking in with phone calls, so parents have a chance to talk about what they’re going through and feel seen and heard. In the longer term, friends and family can also help with advocacy, and lend their support through letters and emails to politicians and institutions, if that could help get extra support and services for your child, beyond this exceptional time.2. Join a peer support group for parents and caregiversAt the end of the day, being able to chat with people who get what you’re going through can be a lifeline. Not having to explain, being able to vent guilt-free and having a network to advise you on resources and services they’ve accessed can help you get through the tough times. Since many of these groups have strong online networks, you can access support once your child is in bed, from your phone or home computer. Facebook is a good place to start your search, or contact a major Canadian organization that supports families of children with your child’s specific condition.3. Check out new pandemic respite care possibilitiesSome major hospitals and community health centres are responding to the crisis, by offering respite care for blocks of a few hours, to families that need it during the pandemic. One such example is Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ottawa, but it’s worth connecting with your family doctor, social worker or specialists who work with your child, to find out about local resources. 4. Know the symptoms of caregiver burnout While the typical self-care advice may be somewhat useless to parents without a minute to themselves at this time, it’s still important to pay attention to what your body is telling you. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, struggling to sleep or stay asleep,having headaches or chest pains, becoming excessively irritable or feeling hopeless, it’s important to contact a medical professional for a diagnosis and treatment options. 5. Relax your usual standardsDo what you have to do to get a moment to yourself, whether that means giving your kid extra screen time, shifting them to an earlier bedtime or using prepared meals or delivery services, if that’s within your budget. Exceptional circumstances call for exceptional strategies, so be kind to yourself and focus on simply getting through this, from one day to the next, over any other parenting goals. RELATED PARENTING STORIES What Fatherhood Means To A Trans Dad Raising Black Sons None Of The Ontario Back To School Plans Will Bring Relief To Parents My Son Has Autism. Here's How We're Adjusting To The 'New Normal' WATCH: HOW THE PANDEMIC IS IMPACTING KIDS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
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