Man dropped at Calgary hospital victim of ‘targeted shooting,’ homicide unit investigating
Calgary police say a man dropped off at the Peter Lougheed Centre and later died was the victim of a targeted shooting.
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I love you, Toronto — it’s time to say goodbye
Crime journalist Tamara Cherry returns to the Prairies after a 14-year detour in Toronto with the Toronto Star, Toronto Sun and CTV News. “I have been most impacted by the lessons learned in those pockets of painful beauty, from the people who have forced me to reflect on what it means to love and to lose and to keep on living.”
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Gregor Chisholm: Nate Pearson’s future is bright, but there will be limits in 2021 for the Blue Jays’ young right-hander
An elbow injury and an abbreviated season limited the Jays’ top pitching prospect to 20 innings in 2020. So this year’s projections will probably be pushed to next year.
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Human remains found in recycling bin floating off Kits Point in Vancouver’s 15th homicide of 2020
The remains were found in the large blue bin, which was in the water off Kits Point, police said.
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Guelph police searching for wanted man considered armed and dangerous
Brantford police tried to arrest 28-year-old Nicholas Olner over the weekend but he remains on the loose.
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Author makes Mediterranean diet fit Americans
The Mediterranean diet begins with foods that are commonly eaten around the Mediterranean Sea, but it is also about a certain lifestyle, Serena Ball says.
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Air Transat lays off more than 50 per cent of remaining flight attendants as pandemic continues
CUPE says last week's layoffs leave only 117 flight attendants working for the month of November, down from 245 flight attendants working in October, 355 in August and 2,000 before the COVID-19 pandemic.
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2 new cases of COVID-19 in Kingston region, 2 more resolved, 9 active
KFL&A Public Health has identified new cases of COVID-19 in the Kingston region.
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COVID-19 more prevalent among Hamilton’s low-income and racialized residents: public health
A new report from Hamilton public health finds that people of colour and those living in low-income households are at a higher risk of being exposed to COVID-19.
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Queen's University to drop Sir John A. Macdonald's name from law school building
Queen's University in Kingston, Ont. says it will be removing the name of Canada's first prime minister from its law school building.
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B.C. Election 2020: Greens would restore B.C. Ferries as a crown corporation
Furstenau said the ferries system should be viewed as necessary infrastructure and not as a profit-driven business
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Collision sends pedestrian to hospital, police ask witnesses to contact them
Police say a man was hit by a vehicle Sunday night while crossing Queenston Road, just west of Parkdale Avenue, in Hamilton.
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TransLink to remove abandoned bikes from parkades so check your wheels
TransLink is conducting a bike parkade clean-out next month to ensure spaces are available for those actively cycling and using the transit system, and that abandoned bikes are donated.
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1 dead, 1 seriously injured following crash north of Campbellford: Northumberland OPP
The crash happened along County Road 50 just north of Campbellford on Monday afternoon.
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It takes a town: How the community is stepping up to help the Orangeville Food Bank through COVID-19
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Human remains found inside recycling bin floating in water near Kits Point
The city has recorded its 15th homicide after human remains were found in a large recycling bin in the water near Kits Point on Sunday morning.
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Alberta politicians to focus on economic recovery as legislature resumes Tuesday
Government house leader Jason Nixon says there's a variety of legislation prepared for the fall sitting that's aimed at speeding up an economic rebound.
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Kitchener city council approves response plan for second wave of COVID-19
Kitchener city council approved a plan to deal with the second wave of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
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Kingston officials thank students for subdued Homecoming, despite some fines
Kingston city officials say for the most part, COVID-19 guidelines were followed over Queen's Homecoming weekend.
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Duck hunt: police searching for thieves who pilfered poultry from Townsend, Ont., property
The ill-gained haul included seven Ancona, six Cayuga, four crested and four Rouen ducks from a property in Townsend, Ont.
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Sick president. Global pandemic. Racial injustice. Welcome to the U.S. election… of 1920.
'America's present need is not heroics, but healing; not revolution, but restoration' said Warren Harding. The parallels to today's campaign are remarkable. The post Sick president. Global pandemic. Racial injustice. Welcome to the U.S. election… of 1920. appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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RCMP ‘Let Down’ Mi'kmaw Fishers, Indigenous Services Marc Miller Says After Violence In Nova Scotia
Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller says the RCMP “let down” Indigenous peoples facing violence amid an intensifying dispute between commercial fishers and Mi’kmaw fishers in southwest Nova Scotia.“The acts of violence we have seen in the past days and weeks are disgusting, unacceptable, and racist in nature,” Miller said at a press conference in Ottawa Monday with Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan, and Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett.“It is a disgrace to see these threats and acts of intimidation and violence take place in this country. We must also recognize that once again, as evidenced by the scenes of violence, Indigenous people have been let down by the police, those who are sworn to protect them.”Watch: Feds denounce violence in N.S. lobster dispute Indigenous peoples have suffered “continuous discrimination” from the consequences of colonial practices, Miller said, but have shown “extreme resilience” and courage by standing up for their rights.“In order to move forward, we need to have a proper peaceful situation and the protection of people on both sides has to prevail. And clearly that has not been the case up to now.”Miller was referencing incidents of violence that erupted last week, including a fire that destroyed a lobster pound Saturday in Middle West Pubnico, N.S.. The blaze, which the RCMP deemed suspicious, happened days after clashes involving hundreds of people outside other facilities that store Indigenous-caught lobster. In one incident, a van owned by an Indigenous fisher was torched.Over the weekend, a man was charged with assaultingChief Mike Sack of Sipekne’katik First Nation.For weeks, non-Indigeous commercial fishers have protested a fishery launched by the Sipekne’katik First Nation last month that has operated outside the federally regulated lobster season. A 1999 Supreme Court ruling, known as the Marshall decision, affirmed the Mi’kmaq treaty rights to fish for a “moderate livelihood.”Though the top court also said the treaty rights would be subject to federal regulations, successive governments over the last two decades have not provided a clear definition of what constitutes a “moderate” living. Over the weekend, N.S. Premier Stephen McNeil called on the federal government to answer the question once and for all.Before we can look at our provincial regulations for fish buyers, the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans needs to answer the question of what constitutes legal harvesting under a moderate livelihood fishery. 3/4— Stephen McNeil (@StephenMcNeil) October 17, 2020The Nova Scotia RCMP has faced criticism for not protecting Mi’kmaw fishers and failing to defuse tensions that have been growing for weeks. NDP MP Charlie Angus told reporters Monday the RCMP “has done little to protect the rights of Indigenous people who are practising their treaty rights,” and called on the Liberal government to send a “clear message” to Mounties that they must do so.But when asked if he agreed with Miller’s assertion the police have failed the Mi’kmaq, Blair, the minister responsible for the RCMP and a former Toronto police chief, wouldn’t say.“What I can say absolutely is that the police have a responsibility to protect all Canadians and certainly to acknowledge, recognize and uphold Indigenous rights,” Blair said. “I think it’s important to acknowledge there is a need for significant reform in respect to how police perform their services in Indigenous communities.”The federal government is working on a legislative framework to ensure police are “responsive and respectful” of Indigenous communities and their rights, he said.“I do acknowledge that there are concerns within Indigenous communities. We’ve heard those concerns and we’re working hard to resolve them.”Still, Blair said he believed the “vast majority of officers do their very best to serve those communities with professionalism, with integrity and with respect.”The public safety minister said additional RCMP officers have been deployed to the area at the request of the provincial government, with the N.S. RCMP now able to draw resources from other provinces in the so-called Atlantic bubble. Blair said RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki is confident she has the resources needed to keep the peace on the ground and uphold the law.But the public safety minister dismissed Sack’s call for the military to be deployed to keep commercial fishers from taking the law into their own hands. The Sipekne’katik First Nation chief told The Canadian Press the fire over the weekend was retaliation from commercial fishers. “They’re doing whatever they want and getting away with it,” he said. “We need the military to come step in to keep the peace.”Blair told reporters the matter at hand isn’t a “military operation,” but a peacekeeping one.“It is the responsibility of the police of jurisdiction, and in this case the responsibility of the RCMP. We have taken steps necessary to ensure they have adequate resources to do the job,” he said.The public safety minister pledged that those who turn to violence or vandalism will be held to account. He said a suspect has been charged with arson over the van that was torched outside a lobster facility last week, and police have identified a person of interest in Saturday’s blaze, who was sent to hospital with serious injuries.’’RELATED Fire Destroys N.S. Lobster Pound As Indigenous Fishery Dispute Rages On N.S. Premier Urges Feds To Define 'Moderate Livelihood' Amid Lobster Dispute Indigenous Fishery In N.S. Hit By Lobster Theft, Fire As Tensions Rise Nova Scotia Lobster Dispute Shows Racism Rooted In Fishing Industry Jordan, the fisheries minister, also reiterated to reporters Monday the Mi’kmaq have a constitutionally affirmed treaty right that is not up for debate. “We’re here because our country operated for centuries without considering First Nations’ rights. We built up whole systems, institutions and structures without considering them,” she said. “And right now we have a chance to change that for the benefit of every single one of us.”She attempted to put aside concerns raised by some commercial fishermen about the sustainability and conservation of the lobsters they depend on for their livelihoods.“Conservation underpins everything we do. Lobster stocks are healthy, (the Department of Fisheries and Oceans) will continue to monitor stocks and we’ll never move forward with a plan that threatens the health of this species,” she said.Sack told CBC News his band has “550 traps in our water.”Miller said Monday that the Indigenous fisheries industry is an “infinitely small portion” of commercial fisheries.“The picture or portrait that’s being painted is one of Indigenous fishers taking all the lobsters,” he said. “That is absolutely not the case.”The four Liberal ministers have joined an NDP request for House of Commons Speaker Anthony Rota to grant an emergency debate on the escalating issue.We condemn the acts of violence in Nova Scotia. This is an important issue that needs to be debated in the House. We request an emergency debate to allow parliamentarians the opportunity to discuss & address implementing the Mi’kmaq Treaty Right. pic.twitter.com/3K3oZYAuVH— Bernadette Jordan (@BernJordanMP) October 19, 2020
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Ontario Minister Flip-Flops In Under An Hour On Long-Term Care Staffing
An Ontario minister contradicted herself Monday, an hour after she said there were no issues with staff numbers in long-term care — and then denied she made the original statement. “The numbers are indicating that our staff are much more secure in their positions,” Minister of Long-Term Care Merrilee Fullerton said in question period. “Our homes are doing well with staffing. There are no issues with staffing collapse in our homes.”She then walked back her statement immediately after question period.“To be clear, I don’t believe I’ve ever said there are no staffing issues,” she said when asked by HuffPost Canada how she knew homes had adequate staff.Fullerton said the province closely monitors homes that have an outbreak to ensure they have adequate staff and evaluate whether they need support from a hospital or community paramedics. “But in terms of the staffing crisis, it was pre-existing before COVID and we were working to address the pipeline and the retention,” she said. She pointed to the province’s temporary wage increase, which will give an additional $3 per hour to about 50,000 long-term care workers.On Oct. 6, an official in Fullerton’s ministry, Melanie Fraser, told Ontario’s long-term care commission that during the summer, “we felt like we were 6,000 PSWs short of what would be required across long-term care and home and community care.” Fraser, associate deputy minister of health service, said the estimate, developed around the end of the pandemic’s first wave, shows the need for that number of PSWs to be split about halfway between long-term care and community care.Fullerton said if there were 6,000 PSWs available to be hired, they could have been hired. “I don’t believe that there were 6,000 PSWs coming forward, and I believe it speaks to the importance of creating a culture and [an] environment in long-term care where people want to come and work,” she said.READ MORE: Ontario Long-Term Care Homes Still Facing Severe Staffing Shortages Ontario Ministry Passed Buck To Long-Term Care Homes Ahead Of COVID-19 2nd Wave Patient Ombudsman Urges Ford To Protect COVID-19 Whistleblowers “I hear various people say well, you know, you need an adequate number of staff, hire more staff. Well I know our homes would love to do that. We have to create a pipeline, so that people want to go into the sector.”She repeated a phrase she used during question period, that you can’t simply “snap your fingers” to create a PSW. “We’re looking everywhere to find flexibility and make flexibility for our sector as we headed into the first wave to make sure that they had the flexibility needed because of the shortage of PSWs. So that shouldn’t be news, but unfortunately it is,” the minister said. The province’s staffing study released at the end of July found the state of long-term care staffing is a “crisis” and recommended the sector hire more staff so residents can receive high-quality care.There is a revolving door of underpaid, part-time workers run off their feet.Andrea HorwathOntario has given $540 million for the long-term care sector to deal with the second wave of COVID-19 infections, including money to help with staffing supports, hire more infection prevention and control staff and others. In September, the province told long-term care homes that it’s up to them to ensure they have enough staff for the second wave. The ministry gave the province’s long-term care homes a second-wave preparedness assessment in the summer, but it did not require those assessments to be sent back for verification and review.“Long-term care homes are so short-staffed, residents are regularly neglected. People get sick from dehydration and malnourishment. There is a revolving door of underpaid, part-time workers run off their feet,” Opposition Leader Andrea Horwath said in a Monday press release.“And so far, over 1,900 residents have died from COVID-19. We have to take action to protect them this time, and we have to do it now with thousands more, well-paid and well-trained staff.”
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COVID-19: McDonald's closes another Montreal restaurant
The closure brings to six the number of McDonald’s in the Montreal region that have had to close in a little over a week because of COVID-19 infections.
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More than 200,000 cases of COVID-19 have now been reported in Canada
The total number of COVID-19 cases in Canada has passed 200,000.
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COVID-19 cases in Canada surpass 200,000
The second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic pushed Canada's total case count past the 200,000 mark on Monday as tougher health restrictions took effect in some regions facing a surge in infections.
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New daily record of 66 coronavirus cases in Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan health authorities say there are 66 new coronavirus cases in the province, with 398 active cases and 1,973 total recoveries.
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Alberta cuts deal on municipal oilpatch levies; not on unpaid property taxes
Alberta has announced a three-year deal that it says will prevent municipal taxes and levies from harming its already battered energy industry.
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Municipal commission to hear nine more complaints against Sue Montgomery
Administrative judge rejects arguments that nine alleged ethical breaches should not be added to the 19 of which she was already accused.
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What it was like growing up at college
Aidan D’Souza has been ‘going to’ Seneca College most of his life. He’s built websites, run cross-country and done an Instagram takeover. He also found time to earn a diploma. The post What it was like growing up at college appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Trump rips Fauci as COVID-19 ‘disaster’ with a ‘bad arm’ for baseball
Trump criticized Dr. Anthony Fauci as a 'disaster' and complained that it would be a 'big bomb' if he fired his top doctor on the coronavirus.
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Toronto FC upset at decision not to award Supporters’ Shield trophy this year
The Shield was created by club supporters in the early years of the league and has been handed out since 1998.
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Norfolk OPP issue online safety reminder after 9-year-old asked for inappropriate photos
Police say a nine-year-old child was asked to send inappropriate photographs to a stranger on an app.
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Five years after Sweden’s Gui Minhai was kidnapped we must keep fighting for his release
Gui’s case is highly relevant not just for Sweden and for Hong Kong, but also for Canada, Australia, Japan, Taiwan, Kazakhstan and other countries that have also seen their citizens seized by the Chinese regime.
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Baie-D'Urfé mayor to step down in November
Maria Tutino says her decision was based on the need to tend to family matters during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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