Okanagan parents relieved list of schools with COVID cases will posted online

A Ministry of Health spokesperson told Global News that information about COVID cases and exposures in B.C. schools will be posted online.
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Manitoba’s minimum wage rises to $11.90 an hour Oct. 1
On Oct. 1, the province said, the minimum wage will increase by 25 cents, rising to $11.90 an hour from $11.65.
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Coronavirus: Niagara Region extends mandatory mask bylaw
At a council meeting on Thursday night, the existing face-covering legislation to combat COVID-19 was extended for six months.
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Services expanded at Winnipeg libraries after months of pandemic restrictions
The Winnipeg Public Library said the expansion of services at all branches across the city will include collection browsing, limited computer use, self-pick-up of holds, and printing and photocopying.
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Hamilton’s Spencer Gorge reopens to visitors, by reservation only
Parking fines for violators are $250 within what the City of Hamilton has deemed a special enforcement area.
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Ottawa is in a second wave of COVID-19: Dr. Vera Etches
Ottawa added 61 coronavirus cases on Friday as the city's top doctor confirmed the nation's capital is facing a second wave of the virus.
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Singh not interested in forcing election but wants more help for Canadians
Singh's comments Friday were his clearest yet on whether the NDP plans to support the minority Liberal government's throne speech next week.
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Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet Tests Positive For COVID-19
Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet has tested positive for COVID-19. Blanchet plans to isolate at his home in Shawinigan until Sept. 26 but feels “perfectly fine,” according to a statement from the party Friday.Quebec’s public health rules say a person who tests positive but doesn’t have serious symptoms must stay isolated for 10 days.The Bloc leader and the 31 MPs in his caucus were already in isolation as a precaution after a staff member tested positive Monday, less than a week after an in-person caucus meeting. Blanchet’s wife, Nancy Deziel, announced Tuesday that she, too, had tested positive for COVID-19.In the statement, Blanchet stressed the importance of keeping up physical distancing measures, wearing masks, and washing one’s hands to slow the spread of the virus.The revelation means Blanchet, leader of the third party in the House of Commons, will not be physically present for next week’s throne speech and the return of Parliament. The government’s much-anticipated speech from the throne will be delivered Sept. 23.Last month, Blanchet made headlines when he said he would move a motion of non-confidence and try to trigger a fall election if he did not see resignations from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his chief of staff, and his then-finance minister Bill Morneau, mostly over the WE Charity controversy. Morneau stepped down less than a week after Blanchet’s public ultimatum.Blanchet suggested at the time that he wasn’t concerned about optics and safety issues involved in potentially forcing another campaign during the pandemic.“Which is more dangerous? A mismanagement of a crisis or taking the time to change the people who are managing the crisis?” he said. Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole also went into isolation with his family Wednesday after a staffer with whom he had recently travelled tested positive for the virus.“My family and I are feeling well, but we take COVID-19 very seriously,” O’Toole said in a statement, adding the “health and safety of my family and all Canadians is my top priority.”O’Toole said Thursday that he was tested in Gatineau, Que., after being “turned away” from an assessment centre in the Ottawa Public Health Unit a day earlier because the centre had reached capacity. He said his family had waited in line for hours.Though provinces are responsible for testing, the experience spurred O’Toole to blast Liberals for not having approved rapid testing methods being used in other countries, including the United States. “I stand with the thousands of Canadian families who are waiting in lines today for tests. It has been seven months, Justin Trudeau must answer for why we do not have access to more of the tests our allies are using,” he said.Health Minister Patty Hajdu said this week that while Health Canada is reviewing rapid testing devices, it won’t approve any of them until it is confident results will be accurate. “We have not had a test submitted to Health Canada for approval yet that satisfies the regulator’s concerns around accuracy,” she said.Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the wife of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, tested positive for COVID-19 in March after returning from the U.K. with a low fever and flu-like symptoms. Her diagnosis prompted Trudeau to isolate at home for 14 days.Grégoire Trudeau made a full recovery weeks later. “From the bottom of my heart, I want to say thank you to everyone who reached out to me with their well wishes. And to everyone who is suffering right now, I send you all my love,” she said in a statement at the time.“I strongly believe that science AND compassion will get us through this crisis.”With a file from The Canadian Press
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$1B supply bill passed in N.L. falls short of Liberal government’s wishes
Liberal government had originally proposed a bill that would let the government keep spending despite not having passed a budget.
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1 dead after 3-vehicle crash on Highway 401 in Pickering
A police spokesperson told Global News a stalled vehicle was hit by other vehicles, causing one of them to catch fire. 
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Second man charged in death of Anthony Charles Johnson in west end Halifax
Johnson was found with a gunshot wound on Jan. 26 around 11:30 p.m. in the area of Connaught and Chisholm avenues in Halifax.
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Air quality expected to deteriorate in Alberta this weekend due to wildfire smoke
It’s predicted air quality in Alberta will worsen this weekend as smoke from wildfires in B.C. and the western U.S. continues to settle over the province.
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Coronavirus: Outbreak declared at sports and fitness facility in Waterloo Region
Waterloo Public Health has declared an outbreak at a sports and fitness facility within the region, saying three cases of COVID-19 have been identified.
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Design of post-CERB benefits could change as pandemic shifts course, minister says
The federal minister overseeing key aid programs for workers during the pandemic says there could still be changes to a proposed package of income-support benefits as the country faces renewed pressure from COVID-19.
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U.S.-Canada Border Closure Extended Until Oct. 21
OTTAWA — Public Safety Minister Bill Blair says the partial closure of the Canadian border with the United States is being extended another month to Oct. 21.Crossings of the U.S.-Canada border have been largely restricted to trade goods, essential workers and citizens returning home since March, in an attempt to limit the spread of COVID-19.Blair and his American counterpart, acting U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf, each tweeted the latest one-month extension of the closure agreement on Friday morning.We are extending non-essential travel restrictions with the United States until October 21st, 2020. We will continue to base our decisions on the best public health advice available to keep Canadians safe.— Bill Blair (@BillBlair) September 18, 2020We continue to work with our Canadian and Mexican partners to slow the spread of #COVID19. Accordingly, we have agreed to extend the limitation of non-essential travel at our shared land ports of entry through October 21.— Acting Secretary Chad Wolf (@DHS_Wolf) September 18, 2020The pandemic has raged in the U.S. throughout the spring and summer, and cases in Canada have recently started rising again, as well.At the same time, leaders in border communities have asked federal authorities to loosen restrictions slightly to allow people with links on both sides to live more normally.On Friday, the Conservatives also called for Blair to allow more compassionate exemptions to the closure, such as for people who are engaged to be married or where loved ones are seriously ill.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 18, 2020.READ MORE Trump Blames Biden For Not Making Masks Mandatory Across The U.S. Doug Ford Appeals To Feds To Fix 'Broken' Quarantine System Trump Administration Drops 'Goofy' Tariff On Canadian Aluminium Also on HuffPost:
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Case of Corey Hurren, who faces 22 charges in Rideau Hall incident, delayed until October
Corey Hurren is accused of ramming his truck through a gate at the Governor General's official residence on July 2.
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Catholic board reports COVID-19 case at elementary school in Niagara Falls
The school board's director says students and staff were exposed.
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Giannis Antetokounmpo wins second straight NBA MVP award, source says
A source says the 25-year-old Milwaukee forward is the NBA’s Most Valuable Player for the second consecutive season.
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Queen Elizabeth strips Harvey Weinstein of honorary title
Disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein is currently serving a 23-year prison term for multiple charges, including sexual assault and rape.
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Your job and COVID-19: Is it time to cut the work week to boost productivity?
Banks Benitez had great plans for his staff for 2020: a four-day week on full pay. Then the pandemic struck. The lockdown and economic downturn caused the chief executive and co-founder of Uncharted, a Denver-based accelerator helping start-ups aiming to solve social and community problems, to doubt whether the four-day plan would work. “The question became, is this the best time to do it? Or is it the worst time to do it? We had lost some funding and revenue and things were tight. We had to lay off a few people in early April.” It seemed logical to encourage workers to put in more rather than fewer hours. Yet after a few weeks of remote working, Mr Benitez saw employees were overloaded from video calls and juggling work with home schooling. “We decided [it] was not the worst time but actually the best time [to go to four days].” So in June, to boost productivity, he cut his 13 employees’ working week. Coronavirus has disrupted working life across the world. Many white-collar workers discovered they did not have to go to the office every day to continue to do their jobs. Yet it was not just where work was done that changed but also when, prompting some businesses to re-evaluate conventional nine-to-five (if you were lucky), five-day working patterns. Those who have had to work around childcare or other caring responsibilities have demonstrated that as long as the work is done, it may not matter when it takes place. A study of 3.1m remote workers in North America, Europe and the Middle East during the pandemic by the US National Bureau of Economic Research found that employees’ working days increased, and they attended more — although shorter — meetings. The report concludes, however, that it was “unclear if this increase in average workday span represents a benefit or drawback to employee wellbeing”. The data did not show whether workers were choosing to work around their family, or if the increased hours were “overwork due to the lack of clear delineation between the office and home”. There were also gender differences in the way working time was protected. According to research by the UK’s Institute for Fiscal Studies, during lockdown mothers’ work was more likely to be interrupted. “Mothers combine paid work with other activities (almost always childcare) in 47 per cent of their work hours, compared with 30 per cent of fathers’ work hours”, the IFS found. Gemma Dale, a human resources consultant and lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University, says that when it comes to debates about work in the Covid era and beyond, there has been too much focus on where work is done, rather than on the hours worked. “People are using this [period] as an opportunity of reflection. It is showing up in the desire to live differently,” she says. Executives have reappraised the necessity of commuting and business travel, for example. Though she acknowledges it is impossible to generalise about how reflective workers could be. “People’s experiences have been very different from being burnt out to baking banana bread,” she says. For those adults who did enjoy aspects of the restrictions to their lifestyle imposed by Covid-19, the Office for National Statistics found that many liked the slower pace. Almost nine in 10 (86 per cent) of adults who reported that they were enjoying spending more quality time with the people they live with wanted to continue doing so after the pandemic was over. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, author of Shorter, which lays out the case for boosting productivity through a shorter working week, says that working from home has also made employees think about how much time had been spent on “supporting activities” such as commuting and personal grooming. As offices open up, organisations may need to stagger start times. This could allow them to take in employees’ scheduling preferences, say researchers, including the times of day they are most productive, as well as helping to avoid overcrowding at work and on public transport. The key is consultation and predictability — lacking control over hours can harm employees’ wellbeing. Full pay for reduced hours? Against the backdrop of widespread job losses, employees will hardly feel able to dictate their working conditions. And shorter working hours on full pay will not be front of mind for employers struggling to keep their companies afloat. Heejung Chung, reader in sociology and social policy at the UK’s University of Kent, says: “What you will probably see more in companies is [they] get people to go on four-day week contracts to save costs. What happens to mothers all the time is the work doesn’t decrease, just the pay.” Many — particularly those on lower incomes — who have had their pay cut will want more hours rather than fewer. Campaigners for shorter working weeks argue that the four-day week could be a way of redistributing work. A recent proposal by Autonomy, a UK think-tank focused on the future of work, made a case for a shorter working time subsidy scheme to prevent lay-offs, reallocate hours and retain jobs as the German Kurzarbeit scheme does. Will Stronge, Autonomy’s director of research, recognises that most businesses’ priority is survival. Nonetheless, he says, this downturn is different to previous ones. “The financial crisis [of 2008 resulted in] job losses. It didn’t disrupt the way people were working. At the same time, there’s been a swell of new policy and thinking around the future of work, around automation and welfare.” In May, New Zealand’s prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, raised the prospect of four-day weeks to boost leisure and travel industries. Whatever the rationale, reducing hours needs careful planning. In May, Uncharted’s staff were given a month’s notice to prepare to reduce their working week by clarifying goals and streamlining work. “It was really figuring out what we say ‘no’ to,” says Mr Benitez. All employees were asked to be available on Mondays to Thursdays between 10am and 3pm for meetings and collaboration but otherwise they could arrange their time themselves. While Fridays are the company-wide day off, Mr Benitez wants to ensure flexibility, for example, a parent working five short days to fit with school hours. After monitoring progress through an independent evaluation, he is convinced of the benefits of the four-day week. On average, the working week reduced 23 per cent from 45 hours. Some employees were concerned that by making every hour count, there was less room for fun, although that could also be a result of remote working during a pandemic. Plans for a four-day week had already been under way before the pandemic at 3D Issue, a software company based in Donegal, Ireland. But Paul McNulty, founder and chief executive, says the crisis has sharpened his resolve to cut hours as a way of attracting new talent in a competitive local market. When the working week was cut, he saw “greater happiness among employees. Some of them talk about having a day to themselves when kids go back to school. They are more refreshed and engaged.” For David Cann, managing director of Target Publishing, it was coronavirus-induced financial difficulties that pushed him to make difficult decisions. “To get us through this we needed to take a 20 per cent pay cut to ride the wave. I didn’t feel quite comfortable. For people on a lower wage it felt like a big ask.” So he cut hours too, giving everyone Fridays off. “The team started to work well together. We produced the same amount of magazines.” He says his 20-strong workforce are not working compressed hours but rather that they are more efficient — remote working had shown Mr Cann that meetings could be streamlined. “It’s early days but it feels right. What that’s achieved is thinking you shouldn’t be scared of change. Covid makes you think differently — I probably wouldn’t have done this unless it was forced on us.”
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Peterborough family dispute leads to assault charges: police
Peterborough police say two people were taken to hospital following a family dispute that turned violent.
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Wasaga Beach resident charged after interfering while firefighters respond to blaze: police
Police say a man released a dog that he said was trained to attack.
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Bill Zacharkiw's Wines of the Week: Sept. 18, 2020
A pinot noir that's worth the extra five cents, a big red to finish off the barbecue season, an expressive verdicchio and a Champagne that justifies the cost.
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New ‘Toronto’ sign unveiled at Nathan Phillips Square
'This new and more durable Toronto sign will ensure that it continues to be part of our city’s landscape for years to come,' Mayor John Tory said.
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This French movie changed my style for good
I’ve got my wardrobe sorted for the next 10 years
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OPP seize 235 cannabis plants in Caledon, Ont.
Police say that a Cannabis Act warrant was executed on Wednesday and that officers seized 235 cannabis plants that were about five to seven feet in height.
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Bloc Québécois leader Yves-François Blanchet tests positive for COVID-19
Blanchet was already in self-isolation after a staff member contracted the illness.
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Doug Ford makes an announcement ahead of the Throne Speech: Live video
Ontario's premier will be joined by Québec Premier François Legault, Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney The post Doug Ford makes an announcement ahead of the Throne Speech: Live video appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Toronto eyes additional measures after ‘troubling’ jump in new COVID-19 cases
Mayor John Tory said he’s concerned that venues like banquet halls are exempt from new gathering limits after weddings have led to several new infections in Toronto.
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New Brunswick reports no new COVID-19 cases on Friday
One case remains active in the province.
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Housing deal 'a victory,' now give us the details: Quebec mayors
Nationally, the agreement will see $55 billion invested in low-cost housing during the next decade to construct.
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A More Comfortable COVID-19 Test Is Coming For B.C. Children
VICTORIA — British Columbia is introducing a new saline gargle test for students from kindergarten to Grade 12 to help make COVID-19 testing easier for children and teenagers.Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said B.C. is one of the first places in the world to use a mouth rinse gargle test for the new coronavirus.“Unlike the [nasal] swab, this is a new saline gargle where you put a little bit of saline water, that is sterile water, in your mouth, you swish it around and spit it into a little tube,” she said at a news conference Thursday.“This test is kind of cool and something we’ve had in the works for a while. This new method is more comfortable, particularly for our younger children.”It is developed by a B.C. company, which reduces the province’s dependency on the global supply chain, she said.Henry described the test as more efficient, which shortens the long lineups and wait times. READ MORE B.C. Nurses Will Soon Be Able To Prescribe Drugs To Help Curb Overdose Deaths Is Halloween Cancelled Because Of COVID-19? What Parents Should Know Will There Be Another Lockdown? Not In The Way You Might Think B.C. Closes Nightclubs And Banquet Halls As COVID-19 Cases Climb Getting tested is key in the fight against the pandemic and the test will make it easier to collect samples from young people, she said.The test can be done without a health professional by parents or children themselves.With schools reopening, Henry said the focus of this new and “easier” method of testing will be on children until there are more supplies.“And we’re hoping to make it more broadly available as we go forward.”The province announced a record daily high of 165 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday and one additional death, bringing the death toll to 220.There has been a total of 7,663 cases of COVID-19 in the province.Watch: B.C. laid out their winter coronavirus plans last week. Story continues below.  The uptick is caused by a combination of increased testing, awareness and contact tracing, Henry said.“Remember that today’s cases are people who have been exposed over the last two weeks.”The province tested 7,674 people for COVID-19 on Wednesday, the highest number of COVID-19 tests ever conducted in B.C. in a single day.Health Minister Adrian Dix reminded people to keep groups small and limit social gatherings.“So, this weekend, and as we plan for Thanksgiving in the fall months ahead, let us once again close ranks on COVID-19, and change its course,” he said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 17, 2020.
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Bloc Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet tests positive for COVID-19
Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet has been diagnosed with COVID-19, the party has confirmed.
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Guelph is opening more recreation centres
The Victoria Road Recreation Centre is resuming operation after it served as the city's assessment clinic for six months.
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Nuggets star Jamal Murray’s upbringing in Canada gave him an edge, former coach says
University of Kentucky coach John Calipari, who had Murray on his Wildcats team for the 2015-16 season, said Murray’s upbringing in Canada continues to pay dividends for the Denver Nuggets star.
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With Cake, N.L. artist Barbara Pratt celebrates her late mother Mary Pratt
The pans are empty, save for the carefully placed parchment paper lining the bottom, and both cast long shadows on the edge of the wooden table. Barbara Pratt first took pictures of them a decade ago, when she was baking a wedding cake for her brother. “They looked so gorgeous, empty like that, and I...
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Soccer club plays socially distant game, loses 37-0 to merciless rival
Players on the team tried to maintain two metres of distance while their opponents scored goal after goal in Germany.
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Forecast models show hurricane Teddy could hit Maritimes next week
The storm was churning northward in Caribbean today, with maximum wind speeds over 200 kilometres per hour.
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Mailbag: Lightning carry the blue and white colours to the Stanley Cup final
A year ago I became an honorary Newfoundlander by kissing a fish. What a year. The good old days were not that long ago.
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The Right Chemistry: What, exactly, poisoned Russia's Alexei Navalny
Blood tests confirmed the presence of a nerve agent in the system of the opposition politician and anti-corruption activist.
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Canada-U.S. border closure extended to Oct. 21
Public Safety Minister Bill Blair says the partial closure of the border with the United States is being extended another month, to Oct. 21.
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Peterborough police use drone to help locate 3 teenagers lost in woods
Three teenagers reported they were lost in the woods in Cavan-Monaghan Township on Wednesday afternoon.
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Killer parties: University students' get-togethers are putting lives at risk, officials warn
University officials say students may face ‘significant penalties’ for flouting COVID-19 guidelines as part of an effort to cut down on ‘superspreader’ events, warning that outbreaks sparked by students put vulnerable communities at risk.
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No known active cases of COVID-19 are reported in Nova Scotia
The province says 1,166 negative tests were completed on Thursday, and 86,031 in total.
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Tatiana Maslany cast as lead in Marvel’s ‘She-Hulk’ TV show
Tatiana Maslany, born in Regina, SK, hasn't had a leading role since sci-fi show 'Orphan Black' ended in 2017.
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