Opening schools a ‘challenge’ but will be safe for kids, Doug Ford says


‘We got the best medical advice we could ever get from some of the smartest minds in the country’ premier tells reporters
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Armed man jumps from moving taxi in Kitchener after dispute with driver: police
Waterloo Regional Police are on the lookout for a man who jumped from a moving taxi after a dispute with the driver.
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Virtual frosh weeks and no-guest dorm policies: Campus life in the age of COVID-19
EDMONTON — As the number of COVID-19 cases spike among the college-age cohort across the country, it is raising  questions about what the return to campus life will be like, and whether the university traditions of frosh week and socials will become something of a bygone era. As lockdowns ease, COVID transmission has been spreading among Canadians in their 20s, leading some health experts this summer to start calling it a “young person’s disease.” “I think it’s probably inevitable, I suppose, as things start to open up … and people are experiencing COVID fatigue and want to socialize,” said University of Alberta infectious disease professor Ameeta Singh. In British Columbia, public health officials have spoken out about partying and other behaviours that have led to a spike in cases among the cohort. Dr. Bonnie Henry, the province’s chief public health officer, said there has been a “rapid increase in the last few weeks in younger people.” Of 4,200 or so active cases in British Columbia, 788 were among those between the ages of 20 and 29, or approximately 19 per cent of cases. In Alberta, where there there are around 1,000 active cases, 234 were among those between 20 and 29, or 23 per cent. In Ontario, of 899 “not resolved” cases, 220 of them are in 20s, or 24 per cent. “I think that people, younger people, do have a tendency to think that they won’t be affected by COVID if they get it,” Singh said. “Perhaps (they are) less (likely) to consider that others in their circle, whether it be parents or grandparents that could potentially be more severely affected were they to become infected.” The case counts in Canada track similarly to the United States, where numerous states have seen exponential rises in cases among younger people. Officials in Texas pinned outbreaks earlier this summer on young people floating down rivers on inflatable tubes. How professors and students across Canada are preparing for a university year like no other Toronto strip club employee may have exposed 500 people to COVID-19 Idris Elba thought he was going to die following COVID-19 diagnosis In Canada, over the course of the pandemic, 15.2 per cent of all COVID-19 cases are among those aged 20 to 29, while 14.3 per cent are among those between 30 and 39. Those aged 40 to 49 account for 15 per cent of all cases. But those aged over 80 comprise 32.7 per cent of hospitalizations from COVID-19, and 71.5 per cent of the nearly 9,000 people who have died. Of those requiring intensive care units, 24.7 per cent are between the age of 60 and 69. The federal government’s data says that less than three per cent of hospital admissions for COVID-19 were among those between the ages of 20 and 29, and accounted for 3.6 per cent of those in the ICU. The 20-29 cohort accounted for only 0.1 per cent of the total deaths from COVID-19. The coronavirus may be called a young persons disease now, but it remains most serious among the older population. Many universities and colleges have shifted to remote classes for September. And while there might not be a lot schools can do about off-campus behaviour, where most bars and restaurants are now open, campuses across Canada are attempting to control what they can, with enhanced cleaning and signage and physical-distancing measures. “The safety and well-being of our students, staff, faculty, instructors and researchers remains our utmost priority,” says a statement from Montreal’s McGill University. Most schools seem to have at least some opportunities for in-person interaction. Two of Canada’s largest universities —  University of British Columbia and University of Toronto, will have mostly online classes, but will also be running in-person classes with physical-distancing requirements. McGill University in Montreal is working on orientation activities for new students that can be done virtually. An article in the McGill Reporter says the “regular programming” of frosh week has been modified. “They replaced regular programming like Beach Day and campus tours with activities like a virtual scavenger hunt, a cooking show, painting, yoga and fitness classes, TikTok challenges, trivia nights, bingo, a virtual escape room, and Zoom-facilitated meet-n-greets,” the article says. At the University of Alberta, student groups are planning virtual orientation activities for new students and professors have put up videos explaining how they’ve adapted their courses for remote learning. Some technical programs at colleges face particular challenges. Algonquin College in Ottawa has a mandatory mask policy on campus, in accordance with Ottawa Public Health guidelines, and says it has reconfigured workspaces, such as labs and shops, to comply with physical-distancing requirements. Dalhousie University in Halifax also has a mandatory mask policy, as does the University of Calgary. In Calgary, there’s yet another twist: campus residences have had to set up isolation rooms where those suspected of catching COVID-19 can self-isolate for the required amount of time. The university also notes there is a “no guest policy” in effect for students living in residence. Memorial University in Newfoundland, which is recommending masks, also says that students and staff should keep a diary of who they’ve come in contact with on campus. “If you are on campus, reduce socializing in public spaces, and remain in your office as much as possible,” says its website. “People still need to bear in mind some of the restrictions that have been put in place,” said Singh. “That needs to be maintained throughout the pandemic.” • Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter: tylerrdawson
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Ford Feels Sorry For Strip Club Patrons’ Partners After COVID-19 Case
Ontario Premier Doug Ford says he feels sorry for the spouses and partners of the hundreds of people potentially exposed to COVID-19 at a Toronto strip club.“I feel sorry for the people when they go to their house and tell them that they were at the Brass Rail, that’s who I feel sorry for,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to be on the end of that one.”Ford was responding to news from Toronto Public Health that 550 people could have been exposed to the virus after a Brass Rail employee, who has since tested positive, worked four days last week. He was asked about whether the incident made him anxious given the focus on keeping community transmission of the virus down so schools can safely reopen, or whether things like this are bound to happen and show the importance of following up on cases. “Well, it’s about follow-up,” Ford said. READ MORE: Hundreds Possibly Exposed To COVID-19 At Toronto Strip Club Vancouver Strip Club Visitors Warned Of COVID-19 Exposure Toronto Restaurant Under Fire After Video Shows Crammed Party On Patio Toronto Public Health (TPH) said it has followed up with close contacts and asked the individuals to self isolate for 14 days and get a COVID-19 test, a message Ford repeated. The public health agency is also contacting the individuals whose names were in the Brass Rail’s contact-tracing log.“You gotta practise social distancing, you gotta put on a mask,” Ford said. “I know that sounds ironic, talking about that, but you have to.”WATCH: Ford says contact-tracing app ‘critical’ tool in containing COVID-19. Story continues below. Dr. Vinita Dubey, Toronto’s Associate Medical Officer, told CTV News that the strip club was not following physical distancing guidelines between tables, or between staff and some customers. Its visitor log was also incomplete, she said.The premier added that the strip club should be treated like any other business, and that the province could send in health inspectors. “They gotta follow the protocols, that’s it. Practise social distancing. I know it sounds crazy when you’re talking about the Brass Rail but you just gotta do it,” he said.
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71-year-old man dead after crash in Canard, N.S.
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This Viral TikTok Video Is Making Mothers Everywhere Tear Up
Here’s a cross section of headlines, all about mothers, published by the North American media over the last couple of months: “Pandemic Could Scar A Generation Of Working Mothers”; “How The Pandemic Could Force A Generation Of Mothers Out Of The Workforce”; “Pandemic Childcare Is Way More Stressful For Moms Than Dads” “Moms Are Not Okay: Pandemic Triples Anxiety And Depression Symptoms In New Mothers.”Do you see the common thread?Yes, there is the fact of a pandemic. But there’s also the stark reality of how that pandemic has affected the health of mothers in particular — mothers who, on average, spend significantly more time caregiving than fathers do, even when they’re employed full-time. To say the least, moms are struggling. So is everyone else, but it’s kind of different. It’s hard enough to raise a kid as it is, never mind while dealing with the anxieties that inevitably accompany a global pandemic. All of this might explain the sudden popularity of a recent TikTok video, in which a mother commiserates with the myriad pressures so many moms are facing right now.@swirl_lifeThis was on my heart HEAVY this morning. If you care, Share with a mom you LOVE #fyp#foryou#foryoupage#foru#momlife#selfcare#momsupport#support♬ original sound - swirl_life“Hi, this video is for the mother on TikTok right now. So if you are not a mother, please continue to scroll and enjoy your For You page,” the video begins. The woman in it, whose handle is @swirl_life, pauses. She waits for the non-mothers to continue scrolling. But if you stick around, what follows is a message so earnest it makes you want to tear up.“Hi. Now that we’re alone — how are you? Did you get any sleep last night? I know you’re worried. There’s so much pressure on you right now,” she says. “I know nobody checks on you because you are so strong, but I just want you to know that I’m here. I’m here for you, Sis. Keep going. You are amazing, and I appreciate you.”The video has already racked up more than 2.7 million views on TikTok. There are 65,000 comments underneath the clip, many of them from mothers explaining how they’ve been feeling lately, and what the video means to them.“You have no idea how many moms’ hearts you just touched. We are never seen,” said one mother.“So I’m two weeks postpartum… and I just burst into tears,” wrote another. “I had to tell my husband that I’m not OK today… and I need help. It’s not easy.”Watch: How some people are coping with their COVID-19 stress and anxiety. Story continues below.The TikTok app is mostly a place where bored teenagers with lots of time on their hands post videos of pranks, dancing or funny skits. But it seems there’s also room for clips offering love and support to those who need it.As one mother wrote, after watching the viral video: “I wish I had someone like you in my life to ask me these things.”RELATED 5 Signs Your Kid Is Anxious About Going Back To School Jodie Turner-Smith Gave Birth At Home To Avoid Systemic Racism In Hospitals Katy Perry Says 7 Days Of Therapy Made Her Ready To Be A Mother Also on HuffPost Canada:
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Coronavirus: London-Middlex reports 2 new cases Friday, including health-care worker
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Laval teen Fernandez lone Canadian woman in U.S. Open tennis draw
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Toronto police release surveillance videos of suspects moments before fatal east-end shooting
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Police lay charges after ‘Indigenous Lives Matter’ signs stolen, destroyed in King Township, Ont.
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Stretch of Guelph’s Gordon Street could be widened to add left-turning lane
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A 25-year-old man has been charged in the shooting death of 5-year-old Cannon Hinnant
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Activists raise alarm as Ontario passes environmental assessment redesign during pandemic
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Kirk Muller expects Claude Julien to be watching Canadiens on TV
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The Weeknd Has Quietly Donated More Than $2 Million To Charities Since June
The Weeknd is famously laconic. He doesn’t talk much. Ever since the Canadian singer materialized on the music scene back in 2010, identity shrouded in the dense haze of anonymity, his energies have been spent on cultivating a distinctive sense of mystery. He’s dark. The music is bruised, melancholic. Fatalistic. You wouldn’t expect a man with an album called “Starboy” to be so averse to the idea of global spotlight, but here we have him, parrying interview requests and only ever tweeting impersonal, career-related dispatches.Instead, Abel Tesfaye prefers to put his money where his mouth is. And he often does. On Wednesday, the singer quietly donated $300,000 to Global Aid in Lebanon, a relief effort committed to supporting the victims of the country’s recent disaster. On Aug. 4, twin explosions tore through the nation’s capital of Beirut, leaving behind $10 to 15 billion USD in property damage, displacing 300,000 from their homes and killing more than 200 others to date. “I am so honoured an humbled to work with artists who have such deep care for the world and right now for our brothers and sisters of Lebanon who are in pain and need our collective help,” The Weeknd’s manager, Wassim “Sal” Slaiby, wrote in a post on Instagram announcing the donation. “I want to thank my brother @theweeknd for his generous and class act of donating $300,000 to the Global Aid for Lebanon campaign.”  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Wassim Slaiby - CEO SAL (@salxo) on Aug 12, 2020 at 12:59pm PDTThe devastating seismic blast in Beirut was loud enough to be registered 241 kilometres away, on the island of Cyprus. A port that was vital for the country’s trade and imports was totally levelled, and hospitals already backed up with COVID-19 patients were left to treat those injured by the blast out on the city streets. “There is an acute shortage of everything,” Hamad Hasan, the country’s health minister, told reporters.The last couple of months have been marked by such donations from The Weeknd, made in relative silence. Since June, the singer, who is estimated to be worth $92 million, has given away around $2.15 million to various social justice organizations — that we know of so far, that is. $100,000 went to National Bail Out, a collective of Black abolitionist organizers working to end mass incarceration. $200,000 went to the Know Your Rights Camp Legal Defense Initiative, to support those who were arrested or fell prey to police brutality while protesting the extrajudicial murders of Black people. $500,000 went to the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund. Another $500,000 to frontline health workers at Scarborough Health Network.When he donated $200,000 to Black Lives Matter, the singer wrote a post on Instagram, asking others to do the same: “Keep supporting our brothers and sisters out there risking everything to push for actual change for our black lives,” he wrote. “Urging everyone with big pockets to give and give big and if you have less please give what you can even if it’s a small amount.   View this post on InstagramA post shared by The Weeknd (@theweeknd) on Jun 1, 2020 at 9:18pm PDTAnd on Aug. 7, The Weeknd held an interactive virtual concert on TikTok, which managed to raise $350,000 for the Equal Justice Initiative through the sale of some limited merchandise.Though his music has always refused to be sweet or spritely, the man himself has often shown his heart over the years, insisting on leveraging his stardom for social justice. In 2016, he donated $250,000 to Black Lives Matter shortly after releasing a statement: “Enough is enough. It’s time to stand up for this. We can either sit and watch, or do something about it. The time is now.”enough is enough. it's time to stand up for this. we can either sit and watch, or do something about it. the time is now. #blacklivesmatter— The Weeknd (@theweeknd) July 7, 2016Earlier that year, he gave $50,000 to the University of Toronto to fund a new class on Ethiopic studies, in the hopes of preserving the Ge’ez language. (Tesfaye is Ethiopian Canadian.) “The Weeknd Is Helping Communities Around The World Flourish,” reads a Global Citizen headline, from 2018.Quiet as he might be, Tesfaye’s actions make a statement when it counts.RELATED Feds To Match Donations From Canadians To Beirut Relief Efforts How You Can Help The People Of Beirut Right Now Lebanese-Canadians Band Together To Help Beirut Following Deadly Explosion Also on HuffPost:
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Alberta Open Farm Days brings urban and rural together during COVID-19
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Tropical Storm Josephine remains weak in Atlantic Ocean
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Ryan Reynolds to B.C. partiers spreading COVID: ‘Don’t kill my mom’
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Coronavirus: B.C. is trending towards massive growth of new cases in September
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COVIDIOTS: Canadian Edition Strip club compromises almost 600 people!
WATCH ABOVE as we find out the City of Toronto is asking patrons of a local strip club monitor themselves for Covid-19 symptoms after a staffer at the club tested positive for the virus. What do YOU think? Tweet and Facebook us! And don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel. 
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Toronto Sun
How professors and students across Canada are preparing for a university year like no other
On a recent morning, at just about 9 a.m. Stephen Heard, a professor of biology at the University of New Brunswick, stood in a stream near his Fredericton home, dripping sweat and turning over stones. It was a hot day in the middle of summer, the time of year when Heard, who studies the interaction between plants and insects, would typically be focussing on his own research. But this is not a typical year, to say the least. So instead of working in his own lab, Heard was perched that day between wet rocks, in hiking shoes and cargo shorts, looking for larvae and trying to remember to smile. Like professors and university instructors all over Canada, Heard has spent his summer preparing to teach almost entirely online this fall. Some undergraduate classes at UNB, where Heard runs a research lab and teaches entomology, among other subjects, will be delivered in person this semester. But most of them, including almost every lecture, will be done remotely, via live and recorded video. For Heard and hundreds of his colleagues, though, that hasn’t meant taping old talks, posting them online and heading for the dock. Instead, they’ve been through a breakneck summer of Zoom seminars, new technologies, course overhauls and, in Heard’s case, the creation of time-consuming videos on the in-and-outs of catching larvae. “Nobody,” he said, “should think that this is coming easy.” The 2020 university and college year in Canada, which begins for most schools the Tuesday after Labour Day, will be unlike any other in this country’s history. Students and professors will be undertaking what amounts to a massive, forced experiment in online learning writ-large. Less than a month out, no one is sure how it’s going to go. Some students are outraged they’ll be paying as much, and in some cases more, tuition to study at home as they did last year for face-to-face learning. International students are worried about getting in to the country, quarantines when they get here, or, alternately, studying at home, where they could be 12 time zones away from their professors. Everyone, meanwhile, is stuck wondering what exactly it means to go to university when you can’t go to university. Students aren’t the only ones wondering. Instructors are coming into the fall less refreshed, in many cases, than dazed. Courses that might, in a normal year, have been updated with an afternoon’s tweaking have each had to be fully re-thought for the COVID world. Brenda Fine, who teaches math and statistics at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, said it’s taken her 40 hours, so far, to redo an assessment she normally could have tweaked in four hours tops. For another course, she’s created multiple versions of all her tests to cut down on potential cheating and added a video component where all 130-plus students will have to explain the steps they took to answer one of the questions. On a larger scale, though, Fine is tangibly rethinking how she actually gets her information across. In the normal world, she can literally walk around a class looking at papers to gauge who’s getting it and who isn’t. With online lectures, that isn’t possible. “It’s just so tempting to not be 100 per cent there,” she said. Jamil Jivani: Ontario's old 'streaming' policy ruined the chances of boys like me 'I don’t think anyone should be sending their kids back': Ontario teachers worried about return to school That broad idea, of rethinking the teaching itself, is a challenge for every discipline, including mine. I teach feature writing to third-year university journalism students at Humber College, in Toronto. Like other instructors, I’ve spent parts of my summer taking seminars on online teaching, learning what works and what doesn’t remotely, and really trying to think through how I’ll get concepts across when I can’t sit down with a student and show them how to make their work better. For what I teach, I think those challenges are real, but not insurmountable. In the end, what I’m doing is giving students tools. To get better, they have to go out and use those tools to report and write their own stories, pandemic or no. For Marlis Schweitzer, who chairs the theatre department at York University, it’s a different scale of challenge altogether. There may be no single academic discipline that relies on proximity as much as drama. The theatre is about interaction, physicality and presence, and not just for actors. Drama programs teach students to build sets, hang lights, plan soundscapes. And none of that is possible remotely in the same way it is face-to-face. That doesn’t mean Schweitzer and her colleagues are giving up. They still plan to teach all the same skills this fall they would in a normal year. In fact, they’ve already started. The York theatre department ran a full summer term this year with video acting lessons, movement seminars and vocal coaching. For the fall, they’ve commissioned two new plays specifically written for online performance that the students will stage and put on. “Once we all had a collective ‘ahhhh! What are we all doing?’ we began to work really hard and that work has been continuing throughout the summer,” Schweitzer said. “There’s really been no rest for faculty.” Still, no one expects things to be perfect. Ken Coates, a senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute, has spent years looking at the transition students make between high school and university. He is particularly worried about first-year students this fall. “When you put the pieces together, you have, I think, the potential for a really serious calamity,” he said. “This is the least prepared cohort of high school students probably ever. They lost a quarter or a third of their academic year in their grade 12 year. They’ve been off school since March. The high school shift to online learning was extremely uneven…. So it’s been a horrible year for them.” Even in the best of times, Coates said, many students struggle to make the leap into university. Expecting them to do so now, from home, with little or no in-person teaching may be a jump too far. He’s worried many universities will have smaller first year cohorts to begin with, and then, in the first month, when students get a sense of what they’re in for, many will drop classes or drop out altogether. You’re dealing with teenagers who signed up for a social experience, to meet new people, see new places, experience new things, he said. “What they get to do instead is sit downstairs in the basement and look at a computer monitor.” Eesha Kohli graduated from high school in Mississauga this spring. She had planned to move into residence at Queen’s University in Kingston this fall. Instead, she’ll be starting her business degree in September at home, with her family. Kohli didn’t really consider taking a gap year. She can’t travel and there isn’t much relevant work. At the same time, she also didn’t see much point in moving to Kingston, just to be on or near a campus she can’t really attend. “The decision was pretty much instant,” she said. “It just didn’t seem worth it to go and pay money to live somewhere where I’d just be stuck in my room all day when I could be at home.” In terms of the academic side, Kohli said she’s expecting a harder version of the online courses she took in high school. What she’s really worried about missing out on are the extracurriculars — the clubs and societies she could have joined to meet people and grow her network. That’s something that’s been on Kate Korte’s mind all summer. In a normal school year, Korte, the editor in chief of the University of Victoria’s student newspaper, would be spending her first weeks behind a table in the Student Union Building, drumming up volunteers. But this year, with the campus mostly closed, that’s out of the question. Instead, Korte has a one-minute slot in a virtual campus tour to make her pitch. But finding new writers is just one of the problems Korte will face as the editor of a campus newspaper on an empty campus. “The fact that the social aspect of campus life will be nonexistent during these non-in-person semesters, it creates a massive challenge for us,” she said. Some of her staff won’t be in Victoria, while many of the students she covers may not even be in Canada. “I feel like I’m reporting on a town of 20,000 people that’s all over the world and all disconnected,” she said. Bridging that gap may turn out to be hardest thing of all this year. The academic side will come. Online courses are not in and of themselves new. Technology has come a long way. But the social aspects of campus, the clubs and friendships, the life that gets lived, will be harder to recreate. For universities, online learning is very real. Online life has a long way to go. National Post rwarnica@postmedia.com
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds responds to Premier Horgan’s call for COVID-19 help
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