Ottawa police chief bans officers from wearing ‘thin blue line’, other patches

The "thin blue line" and other patches or modifications to Ottawa Police Service uniforms are now banned under a new policy from Chief Peter Sloly.
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Have your say: Will you listen to Blue Jays game simulcasts on radio?
For the first time, the Jays won’t have a dedicated radio crew this coming season.
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Edmonton police continue search for suspect after Black Muslim woman allegedly threatened
Police said surveillance images of the suspect are being circulated amongst police in an effort to identity him.
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‘The next generation.’ Wild’s Matt Dumba launches hockey camp aimed at diversity
The inaugural Matt Dumba Hockey Without Limits Camp, involving about 120 kids from three local groups, was part of Hockey Day Minnesota festivities.
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Montreal police looking for missing 17-year-old girl
Alexandra-Rose Cullen-Laplante was last seen around 2:30 p.m. on Friday in the Ahuntsic-Cartierville area.
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COVID-19: 415 new cases, 6 more deaths in Alberta on Saturday
Alberta Health confirmed 415 more cases of COVID-19 and six additional deaths from the disease on Saturday.
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A Quebec River Has Been Granted Rights And Legal 'Personhood'
MONTREAL — With its kilometres of rapids and deep blue waters winding through Quebec’s Cote-Nord region, the Magpie river has long been a culturally significant spot for the Innu of Ekuanitshit.Now the river, a majestic, world-renowned whitewater rafting destination, has been granted legal personhood status in a bid to protect it from future threats, such as hydro development. Its new status means the body of water could theoretically sue the government.On Feb. 16, the regional municipality of Minganie and the Innu Council of Ekuanitshit adopted separate but similar resolutions granting the river nine legal rights, including the right to flow, to maintain its biodiversity and the right to take legal action.One of the resolutions says the river can be represented by “guardians” appointed by the regional municipality and the Innu, with “the duty to act on behalf of the rights and interests of the river and ensure the protection of its fundamental rights.” It notes the river’s biodiversity, importance to the Innu and potential as a tourism destination as reasons why the body of water needs special protection.Pier-Olivier Boudreault, with the Quebec branch of the environmental charity Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, says the move is rooted in the belief that the river is a living entity that deserves rights. “The idea is that the river is living, that it has an existence that doesn’t depend on humans,” he said in a recent interview.“It’s not a simple resource for humans; it becomes an entity that has a right to live, to evolve naturally, to have its natural cycles.”Boudreault says the new designation for the Magpie is the first time a river has been granted legal status in Canada. Similar efforts have been successful in countries like New Zealand, India and Ecuador.Some municipalities, corporations already have legal personhoodDavid Boyd, an environmental lawyer and United Nations special rapporteur on human rights and the environment, says the idea of granting rights to a river isn’t as far-fetched as it seems. “In our legal system, we declare lots of things to have legal personhood, like municipalities and corporations,” he said.He said the “environmental personhood” movement is a response to the belief that successive governments around the world have failed to adequately protect the environment, as well as to the growing recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ rights and their legal concepts.While this is new in Canada, he said the resolution “could have quite a bit of strength” because of the constitutional protection of Indigenous rights. “In theory, you could have a lawsuit brought on behalf of the river to prevent a hydroelectric project from taking place,” he said.Uapukun Mestokosho, a member of the Innu community who has been involved in the Magpie river conservation effort, said the river is an important part of the traditional territory of the Innu of Ekuanitshit.For some, spending time on the river is a way to reconnect to traditional land-based practices that were partially abandoned because of the trauma suffered by Indigenous people from colonial violence, including the residential school system.“People are suffering a lot, with intergenerational traumas linked to the past,” said Mestokosho, who described occupying the territory as “a form of healing.” Mestokosho said her ancestors have always protected the Magpie, known as the Muteshekau-shipu, and that the recognition of the river’s rights will allow them to protect it for future generations.She and Boudreault agree the biggest threat to the Magpie is likely to come from the province’s hydro utility, which has raised the possibility of damming the fast-flowing river.Hydro-Quebec insists it has no plans for the Magpie in the “short or even medium term” and that no plans are “even foreseeable” in the next decade. “But in the long term, we do not know what Quebec’s future energy needs will be,” spokesman Francis Labbe wrote in an email.“Right now, we do not consider it responsible, in terms of Quebec’s energy security, to permanently renounce to the potential of this river.” Any future project would have to meet several criteria, including social acceptability, he noted.Boudreault says the Innu, members of the regional government and other environmental activists haven’t given up on lobbying the Quebec government to grant the river official protected status. He said he thinks the province has been reluctant to commit to the idea, mostly because of the river’s potential for hydroelectric power.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 27, 2021.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDOntario Announces Plans To Expand Greenbelt Protected AreaA Debate Is Raging Online About Which Province Is The ‘Florida’ Of CanadaFirst-Ever Fossils Confirm Baby Tyrannosaurs Were Adorable
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Edmonton NDP MLA Janis Irwin’s office vandalized
Residents arrived at NDP MLA Janis Irwin's constituency office Saturday to show their support after Irwin's office was vandalized.
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Nigerian forces continue search for 300 abducted girls after teenage boys freed
The release comes just a day after the raid on a school in Zamfara state where gunmen seized 317 girls.
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Search underway for missing woman last seen Friday in North Vancouver
Mounties say Fatemeh Abdolali was last seen shortly after noon on Marine Drive between Capilano Road and Mackay Avenue.
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Lady Gaga's Dogs Found Safe After Theft, Shooting
LOS ANGELES — Lady Gaga’s two French bulldogs, which were stolen by thieves who shot and wounded their walker, were recovered unharmed Friday, Los Angeles police said.A woman brought the dogs to the LAPD’s Olympic Community Police Station, just northwest of downtown, around 6 p.m, said Capt. Jonathan Tippet, commanding officer of the department’s elite Robbery-Homicide Division.Lady Gaga’s representative and detectives went to the station and confirmed that they were the dogs, Tippet said.The singer is currently in Rome to film a movie.The woman who dropped off the dogs appears to be “uninvolved and unassociated” with Wednesday night’s attack, Tippet said.In a tweet Friday night, the LAPD said the woman had found the dogs “and reached out to Lady Gaga’s staff to return them.”Her identity and the location where the dogs were found won’t be disclosed for her safety and because of the ongoing investigation, the LAPD said.Both of Lady Gaga’s dogs have been turned in to a local police station, and they have been safely reunited with Lady Gaga representatives. https://t.co/c5Z5QMa944— LAPD HQ (@LAPDHQ) February 27, 2021The dog walker, Ryan Fischer, was shot once as he walked three of the singer’s dogs in Hollywood. Video showed a white sedan pulling up and two men jumping out. They struggled with the dog walker before one pulled a gun and fired a single shot before fleeing with two of the dogs. The third escaped and has since been reunited with Lady Gaga’s representatives.The dog walker can be heard on the video saying he had been shot in the chest. He is expected to survive his injuries, Tippet said.“I continue to love you Ryan Fischer, you risked your life to fight for our family. You’re forever a hero,” Lady Gaga said in an Instagram post.Lady Gaga on Friday repeated her offer of a $500,000 reward for the return of her dogs — whose names are Koji and Gustav — with no questions asked. Tippet said since police were not involved in the reward, he did not know if the woman would receive it.MORE ENTERTAINMENTThe Weeknd's Super Bowl Show Prompts Sweetest Toronto Throwback PhotosDan Levy Hosts 'SNL' With Surprise Appearance By His Proud Dad EugeneAnnie Murphy’s New TV Character Is Basically The Opposite Of Alexis Rose
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Fireball caught on-camera over the sky in Chatham, Ont.
This event was captured by several all sky meteor cameras belonging to the NASA All Sky Fireball Network and the Southern Ontario Meteor Network, operated by Western University.
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B.C. baby fighting rare cancer dies; fundraising money to go to other infants in need
Tragically, baby Alejo died Thursday -- one day before the family learned he had been accepted into an infant cancer trial at a Boston hospital.
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City of Moose Jaw approves additional dollars for unforeseen changes to water pipeline project
Phase two of Moose Jaw's water supply pipeline project began in May 2020 and is expected to be completed in July 2021.
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Nova Scotia advocates urge Ottawa to fulfill election promise to extend EI sickness benefit
Nova Scotia-based health advocates are urging the federal government to implement a 2019 election promise to extend employment insurance sickness benefits.
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Canada's COVID-19 Death Toll Likely Higher Than Official Numbers: Experts
The number of people who would have died from a COVID-19 infection is likely to be much higher than recorded because death certificates don’t always list the virus as the cause of a fatality, experts say.Dr. Nathan Stall, a geriatrician at Sinai Health in Toronto, said deaths that have been recorded as a result of COVID-19 only reflect those who were tested for it.“But there are going to be people who died in excess of what we normally expected, who might have been infected and never got a test and went on to die.”The underlying cause of death in 92 per cent of 9,500 fatalities was recorded on medical certificates as COVID-19 in a November study by Statistics Canada. In the remaining eight per cent of cases, cancer, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or other chronic conditions were most commonly found to be the underlying cause of death.Stall said while the 92 per cent figure is higher than what he expected it to be, he thinks the actual number is likely to be even larger.“I think this also speaks to the confusion people have of how to actually classify a cause of death,” he said, adding those who die are rarely tested to determine if they had COVID-19.He said the better indicator of the pandemic’s death toll will be excess mortality, when more deaths than were expected are recorded during a specific time period.Dr. Roger Wong, a clinical professor of geriatric medicine, said the accurate recording of deaths from COVID-19 is a challenge around the globe.The World Health Organization and medical regulatory bodies in Canada have provided guidelines on how to record COVID-19 related deaths.Wong said an incomplete or inaccurate record of mortality data can have public health implications.Scientists and researchers will get a better understanding of COVID-19 in people with long-standing health conditions by recording as many details as possible in death certificates, said Wong, who is also a vice-dean in the University of British Columbia’s faculty of medicine.“It has implications, not only for COVID-19 deaths, but implications for all deaths,” Wong said. The immediate cause of death may not capture the underlying cause of death.Dr. Roger WongHe said the first line of a death certificate states the immediate reason a patient died, while the second and subsequent lines record health conditions leading to the cause of the fatality.“The immediate cause of death may not capture the underlying cause of death,” he said.In patients who die from COVID-19, they could have also suffered from acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia because the virus affects the lungs, he said, giving an example.In those cases, the first line would list respiratory syndrome as the cause of death, and the second and third lines would say what led to it, which could be pneumonia and COVID-19 respectively, Wong said. It is important to note what caused the pneumonia, he said, adding in a number of cases it could be COVID-19.Long-standing illnesses or comorbidities, such as diabetes, heart or kidney disease, also complicate how deaths are recorded, Wong said, as those patients are at higher risk of infection.“COVID-19 should be recorded as an underlying cause of death, not so much as a concurrent health condition that happened to be there,” Wong explained.Stall used cardiopulmonary arrest as another example of fatalities that don’t always list COVID-19 as a factor.“Well, everyone dies of cardiopulmonary arrest, because everyone dies when their heart stops beating and the lungs stop breathing. That’s not a cause of death. That’s the mechanism of death,” Stall said.“The cause of death is COVID-19, and ultimately all events lead to cardiopulmonary arrest but that’s a common example that I’ll sometimes see as a cause of death when it certainly is not the cause.”There needs to be better education and “a bit more” quality control in how deaths are recorded, he said.“It’s not something we learn a ton about in medical school or something that’s given a lot of attention and consideration by individuals who are often in a rush to do it so the body can be released to the morgue or funeral home.”The StatCan study said international guidelines are followed to record COVID-19 as the cause of death where the disease “caused, or is assumed to have caused, or contributed to death.”Stall said accurately recording deaths helps stamp out misinformation about the pandemic as well as gauging how the country has been affected by it.“We are looking at the picture and the complete scope of what COVID-19 has done to our population in our country,” Stall said.“And in order to look after the living, you need to count the dead.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 27, 2021.Also on HuffPost:RELATEDMandatory Hotel Quarantine Now In Effect For Most Travellers To CanadaTrudeau Agrees To Boost Vaccine Funding For Lower-Income CountriesHow The New COVID-19 Variants Are Different From The Original
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Coronavirus: Pointe-Claire’s Bob Birnie Arena transformed into mass vaccination site
Open seven days a week, the site can vaccinate up to 1,500 people per day.
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Elderly Quebec man dies after flipping tractor during snow removal
The accident took place on a private road in a wooded area on the man's property, in St-Côme-Linière, Beauce, about an hour and a half southeast of Quebec City. 
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