Peterborough Public Health to enforce new vaping restrictions starting July 1

The restrictions will limit the sale of specific flavours and concentrations of vapes to specialty retail stores and licensed cannabis retailers.
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Efforts continue to rehome city’s homeless
Hundreds of people experiencing homelessness have been relocated as COVID-19 continues to impact the city’s most vulnerable. On Tuesday, the city announced ongoing measures have, since April, successfully relocated 550 people from 43 encampments around the city into interim housing, city-rented hotel rooms and shelters — including 121 individuals from in and around Moss Park. […]
Toronto Sun
Tori Stafford’s Dad calls for kindness to mark what would have been her 20th birthday
'Just reach out and do some random acts of kindness,' said Rodney Stafford in an interview ahead of what would have been a milestone birthday for his murdered daughter.
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Windsor-Essex is one of Canada’s worst coronavirus hotspots. Here’s why
The region is home to an increasing number of new cases — the vast majority among migrant workers in agricultural settings.
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Visitors welcome, says Tourism Kelowna, but research recommended before travelling to Okanagan
Tourism Kelowna says it's welcoming tourists to the Central Okanagan despite a cluster of COVID-19 cases connected to Kelowna.
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City faces dire times without help to pay $1.9-B COVID tab: Tory
The city’s tab for dealing with COVID-19 will soar to nearly $2 billion by the end of the year, according to budget figures released Tuesday. A budget variance report predicts the city will find itself in a $1.9-billion budget hole without help from senior levels of government. “As the report notes, to generate $1.9-Billion in […]
Toronto Sun
Model says she’s scored an invite to NBA’s bubble
Will the bubble burst? There have been fears that the NBA’s bubble concept might collapse eventually because of outsiders infiltrating and an Instagram model says she’s already been given an invite by an unidentified player. Anna Mya said she received the request to join the player in Orlando. “I already got invited to the bubble,” […]
Toronto Sun
Demand for COVID-19 testing remains consistently high in Alberta’s big cities
Numbers obtained by Global News from AHS show that more than 2,000 tests were booked almost every day for the last week in the Edmonton zone.
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Study asks N.D.G. residents to measure trees in their own backyards
Though Montreal has an excellent inventory of the trees on public land, there is a lack of information about trees on private land.
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Coronavirus: YMCA of Central East Ontario delaying reopening until Sept. 1
The YMCA of Central East Ontario will not reopen its fitness facilities in Peterborough, Quinte West and Belleville until Sept. 1
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Changes coming for international students beginning Canadian studies online
The federal government is rolling out a series of measures aimed at making it easier for international students who will be beginning their fall semesters taking online courses from Canadian schools, while COVID-19 restrictions remain in place.
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Pain, heartache continue as families of those killed on downed Ukrainian plane wait for answers
'I don't feel this pain is healing at all. I feel, in the last six months, it has deepened in this anger and this sadness,'
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Cards granting medical exemptions from wearing face masks are bogus, feds warn
Canada's human rights watchdog says no Canadian should use what it describes as fake cards claiming to grant medical exemptions from wearing face masks in public.
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NS Power’s application for time-of-day tariffs could give residents lower pricing options
If approved in November, NS Power customers would be able to monitor the cost of power and decide when to do laundry or run the dishwasher to save on their bills.
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Paris Jackson follows in dad’s footsteps with EP ‘The Soundflowers’: ‘I was born to do this’
During the interview, the 22-year-old musician recounted a piece of advice her father, Michael Jackson, shared with her before his death in 2009.
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Backyard Oasis: Communal garden in Toronto offers residents beauty, stress relief
Nestled between Rosedale, Leaside and the Don Valley Ravine in Toronto, Governor's Bridge is a small neighborhood with a heritage property called Governor's Manor.
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Ghislaine Maxwell denied bail after pleading not guilty in Epstein-related sex abuse case
Jeffrey Epstein associate Ghislaine Maxwell was denied bail after pleading not guilty to sex abuse charges.
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Ghislaine Maxwell pleads not guilty in Epstein-related sex abuse case
Jeffrey Epstein’s former girlfriend pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges she recruited girls and women for the financier to sexually abuse more than two decades ago.
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Riverdale Farm, High Park Zoo reopen — with limits
The farm and zoo are among free family-friendly city attractions reopening after being closed for months to help stop the spread of COVID-19.
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Groundlings, Upright Citizens Brigade face racism and the ‘comedy problem’
There is finite room in the top ranks of L.A.’s leading improv and sketch comedy groups, and the performers selected to breathe the rarefied air have long been white.
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More Canadians will be working from home post-pandemic, StatCan data suggests
New data from Statistics Canada suggests that more Canadians will be working from home once the COVID-19 pandemic is over as more employers report that their staff can effectively do their jobs remotely.
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Buckingham Palace Selling Homemade Gin To Make Up For Pandemic Losses
The pandemic has been hard on everyone and even Queen Elizabeth realizes you might need a drink to get through it.The Royal Family announced Monday that they’ve started selling homemade gin. Buckingham Palace gin is made from ingredients gathered at the palace gardens, which span about 39 acres and have about 200 species of wildflowers.According to the palace’s website, it contains 12 hand-picked flowers and citruses, including “lemon, verbena, hawthorn berries and mulberry leaves.” Mulberry trees were planted in the royal gardens in the 1500’s under King James I, and there are now 40 different species growing in the gardens.“For the perfect thirst-quencher, the recommended serving method is to pour a measure of the gin into an ice-filled short tumbler before topping up with tonic and garnishing with a slice of lemon,” suggested the palace in its official announcement. The beverage will also be served at  events there.It isn’t surprising that the palace picked gin as their beverage of choice. Queen Elizabeth, as well as her late mother, are notoriously known for their love of gin cocktails made with Dubonnet, a French floral aperitif. The Queen likes her cocktail with two ice cubes and a slice of lemon right before lunch. A former royal servant once revealed that the Queen Mother once requested two small bottles of Dubbonet and gin on a handwritten note, saying that she would take it with her in the morning “in case it is needed.” The note ended up becoming a sought-after royal artifact that was auctioned off for £16,000.The palace’s gin on the other hand is being sold for a much reasonable price, with the 70 ml bottles costing 40 pounds (about C$68). They come at a proof of 42 per cent but are unfortunately only available in the United Kingdom at this time.Proceeds from the sale of the gin will go into the Royal Collection Trust, a charity that helps preserve and manage many of the royal palaces and the exhibits inside them.The Royal Family had to come up with a way to make up for major losses they suffered after having to close the palace and several other tourist destinations during the pandemic. The Royal Collection Trust said earlier this month that they forecasted a 30-million-pound loss and had to cut back on staff pay. Sightseers are a major source of income for the Royals and after voluntarily shutting down for the pandemic, their forecasted profit of £77 million went down to £13 million. Some of the royal palaces are reopening on July 23 with new social distancing measures.Until then, if you want a taste of the royal life and a break from the chaos of this year, responsibly pour yourself a gin cocktail. After all, it’s 11 a.m. somewhere and the Queen herself is indulging in a little sip.RELATED Prince Harry And Meghan Markle Still Have This Royal Privilege Queen Elizabeth Has A Quiet 94th Birthday During Coronavirus Lockdown The Queen Reminds Us All To Play Our Part During COVID-19 Pandemic
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4 new coronavirus cases confirmed in Simcoe Muskoka, local total now at 616
The new cases are in Barrie, Bradford, Innisfil and Penetanguishene, Ont., involving women ranging in age between 18 and 63.
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Former Belleville nurse charged with 69 counts of using personal health information
A former nurse in Belleville is facing 69 counts of use of personal health information.
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Roger Stone denies withholding ‘the goods’ on Trump in exchange for clemency
In his first television interview since Trump commuted his sentence Friday night, Stone said he had been misinterpreted when he said he had refused “to play Judas” against the president.
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Interior Health: Public risk low after South Okanagan farm issued COVID-19 quarantine order
In announcing the coronavirus quarantine order on Monday, Interior Health said they considered the risk of public exposure to be low.
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She Grew Up On Radioactive Soil In Toronto. Now She Digs Deep For Black Canadian Health.
This is part of an ongoing HuffPost Canada series on food insecurity and how it’s affecting Canadians during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this edition, we talk to two Canadians who have made it their mission to provide Black locals access to fresh quality food, no matter where they live.Jennifer Forde has fond childhood memories of munching on crisp cucumbers, tomatoes, and other fresh goodies grown in her mother’s bountiful backyard in Scarborough, Ont.’s Malvern neighbourhood. Her Barbadian parents were proud and excited to call the up-and-coming area home; Forde’s father purchased the property for merely $1,000 in 1972, thanks to winning a special lottery for civil servants. But almost a decade after they moved into the housing development, her family and their neighbours made a horrifying discovery because of a story by journalism students Frank Giorno and Janel Glassco: Their homes were built on a radium plant’s dumping site, making the soil extremely radioactive.  “It was a very diverse, extraordinary place to grow up in,” Forde told HuffPost Canada about her childhood neighbourhood. “When the land was discovered, it really hurt the community. We had no trust in the government.”Forde says her family have health complications due to living on contaminated soil. George Heighington, a fellow resident and the author of a book about the neighbourhood’s struggles, told HuffPost Canada that he’s anecdotally heard of similar ailments suffered by his neighbours over the years; he called the residence Forde lived on the “hottest spot” in the area, in terms of radioactivity.It was that hurt over the McClure radioactive site and conversations with family members that led Forde to start a farmers’ market in her former neighbourhood; Malvern has a reputation for being both underserved and a food desert for the many Black and racialized people who live in it today. @porterthereport@TheStopCFC Similar map shows relation btwn Toronto food deserts & priority neighbourhoods pic.twitter.com/dvu1MeQepe— Food Forward (@pushFoodForward) April 21, 2015As one of Ontario’s few Black farmers’ market managers, it’s become Forde’s mission to make sure many Toronto-area neighbourhoods, but especially those hit hardest by racial inequality, can access nutritious, culturally-appropriate food — a timely call to action, given the pandemic’s destructive effect on Black Canadians. How racial disparity, COVID-19, and nutrition intersect  As Global News reports, Black Toronto neighbourhoods have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, a trend that researchers have seen across Canada, in the U.S., and the U.K. The disparity can be fatal, as the latest data compiled by the New York Times shows that Black Americans were twice as likely to die from the virus than white Americans. There are many theories on this pattern, including pre-existing conditions caused by inequities in health-care access and exposure due to being on the front lines. Less talked about, but just as important to examine is the potential role environmental racism and access to nutrition plays in why Black people make up significant numbers of COVID-19 cases; Black households in Canada are over three times more likely to go hungry when compared to white households.Environmental racism is defined as the ways people of colour are marginalized by their surroundings, be that communities living in heavy pollution and toxic conditions like Forde did or through racism that contributes to a lack of affordable healthy food options in low-income areas, a.k.a., food deserts.  An analysis by CBS Chicago is one of many applying that link on a local level, with epidemiologist Dr. Mercedes Carnethon telling the outlet that distance and historical marketing of unhealthy foods has impacted how Black neighbourhoods eat, and therefore what health conditions residents may develop. Watch: how a lack of healthy food plays a role in COVID-19 deaths in Chicago’s Black communities. Story continues below.So if a healthy lifestyle is tied to what you eat and you’re a low-income racialized person living in a food desert, how are you supposed to thrive? Bridging the gap, Forde decided, required bringing fresh produce growers directly to people in need.“Who is offering opportunities to help these vendors get their products to people who really appreciate or need that feeling of home, of inclusion? And how can they get it affordably? That’s my job,” she said. “You can pick it, but who’s going to be the conduit between the field and the table?”  Callaloo plant, okra can be grown locally Forde decided to start up Malvern’s Farmers’ Market in 2018, which later evolved into the Scarborough Farmers’ Market. She now also runs the Courtyard Farmers’ Market in Toronto’s East York and Etobicoke boroughs, with five pick-up sites across the city. View this post on InstagramA post shared by Courtyard Farmers' Market (@courtyardfarmersmarket) on Jul 6, 2020 at 11:13am PDTMaking sure her vendors’ wares are culturally-appropriate and reflect the diversity of Toronto is important for Forde, meaning customers looking to make callaloo can pick up ingredients for it. Okra, bitter melon, and scotch bonnet peppers are some of the vegetables known to appear at previous markets, thanks to vendors like those from the Toronto Black Farmers and Growers Collective.    A majority of the vendors Forde works with are women, including Nigerian farmer Buchi Onakufe who operates Akachi Farms in Woodbridge, Ont.Onakufe comes from a microbiology background, which led to her passion for organic crop-growing. In the produce box she offers, her summer harvest includes the usual kale and beets seen in big-box supermarket chains. But as the season progresses, she plans to add ewedu, a nutrient-rich mineral plant from her homeland, and Jamaican scallions.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Scarborough Farmers' Market (@scarboroughfarmersmkt) on Jun 16, 2020 at 2:47pm PDTFor people who can’t access farmers’ markets, Onakufe had previously run classes helping people turn small spaces into backyard gardens to grow food sustainably. “You can grow kale, spinach, collard greens, peppers. You don’t need to spend money on that,” she told HuffPost Canada.The importance of Black ownership in growing food National data on the demographics making up Canada’s agricultural industry don’t include race, but as the non-profit Organic Alberta notes, Black farm owners and Black people in positions of power in agriculture are visibly sparse and comparable to the U.S., where just over one per cent of farmers are Black. Onakufe can attest to the hurdles people who look like her may face; in her personal experience, getting her start as an apprentice included the hurdles of child-raising and combating racism at the same time. Intergenerational trauma related to the lack of representation isn’t lost on Onakufe, who acknowledged the traumatic role the transatlantic slave trade may have in dissuading Black involvement in the field, nor on Forde.Both still advocate for owning the means of growing food for Black communities, for the purposes of lifting each other up and to get through hard times like these. As Environmental Health news writer Ashley Gripper puts it, “pandemics like COVID-19 emphasize why community control of food systems and land are not just important but they are quite literally our means of surviving, healing, and thriving.”“The nature of slavery decomposed the Black family structure,” Forde said. “All we want is to be treated fairly so we can access properties with the same regard and interest [as non-Black farmers].”Not to mention, Forde added, the joy of growing and having agency over your own food is second to none. Five years ago, her two sons played a lot of hockey and needed as many healthy meals as she could afford.After getting over the initial trepidation related to her mother’s yard, she started a crop and flower garden to feed her kids and hasn’t looked back since, a project she’s dubbed “urban garden survivors.”  #UrbanGarden Garden Survivors #10#GrandrisingIt has been at least 8 weeks since we have had the fortitude to share updates re our garden!We are happy to share our #Community, like our garden keeps flourishing through it all with God's grace!This train is bound for glory. pic.twitter.com/esZL6Gdbb4— J. Forde (@VisionQuestOrg) July 7, 2020“It’s therapeutic on so many levels,” she said. “I don’t live anywhere tucked away, I live by [a major intersection]. It’s a little oasis.” Where to support Black people in agricultureThe Black Women’s Agricultural Freedom Fund began as a response to anti-Black racism that forced two women out of jobs in a food justice organization, the campaign’s description states. View this post on InstagramA post shared by
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‘This is my second chance’: COVID-19 survivor who defied odds recovering in rehab centre
Mario Castillo spent nine weeks attached to a ventilator after being diagnosed with COVID-19. Now. he's on the mend and eager to get home to his family.
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New York City’s wave of gun violence continues with three drive-by shootings
The shootings continued a wave of gun violence that has gripped New York this summer.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
‘Glee’ cast captured in powerful photo as they gather at lake where Naya Rivera died
In an emotional moment, the cast of 'Glee' held hands along the shoreline of the lake where Naya Rivera died.
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City of Surrey becomes 1st in B.C. to appoint ethics commissioner
Lawyer Reece Harding has been appointed to the position and has extensive experience working with local governments.
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Tiger Woods returns to a golf world with no crowds to roar
This week’s Memorial will be Tiger’s first tournament in five months. In this environment, does it even matter? It’s not like ticket sales will explode with no spectators allowed. As a TV spectacle, though, it’s not bad.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
COVID-19 spending, massive drops in tax revenues leads to $12.5B forecast deficit in B.C.
The financial update presented by Finance Minister Carole James on Tuesday is the first look British Columbians have had at the provincial coffers since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Temporary causeway up and running after bridge collapse near Canso, N.S.
Contractors had been transporting equipment that would be used to replace Tittle Bridge this summer when it collapsed.
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‘Predatory’ coyotes prompt closure of part of Winnipeg’s Assiniboine Forest
The province has shut down an area of Winnipeg's largest park due to dangerous behaviour from coyotes.
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‘It’s about doing the work’: Kawhi Leonard says social justice about more than statements on jerseys
When the Clippers resume their NBA season against the Los Angeles Lakers on July 30, Leonard wants to spark change in a different way.
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Opinion: Who should be in charge — an elected mayor or bureaucrats?
Whatever happens in the Sue Montgomery case, the balance of power between Montreal and its boroughs needs to be reviewed.
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Manitoba reports 5 new coronavirus cases Tuesday, ending 13-day no-case streak
Health officials said Tuesday five new cases have been identified, bringing Manitoba's total number of lab-confirmed positive and probable positive cases since March to 330.
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Police chief says two Alberta officers who photographed, surveilled politician were ‘held accountable’
The two officers have been temporarily demoted after a disciplinary hearing found them guilty of multiple counts of misconduct for taking photos of and surveilling the then-environment minister
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Coronavirus: Hamilton says all tests at Grace Villa negative after reporting positive case
A day after monitoring a care home for a potential outbreak, public health officials now say Grace Villa has no COVID-19 cases.
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Coronavirus cases remain at 205 for Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit
The health unit reports one new resolved case in both the City of Kawartha Lakes and Northumberland County on Tuesday.
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COVID-19 situation in U.S. complicates Blue Jays plans to play at home, official says
Canada’s deputy public health officer Howard Njoo said the issue of having both the Blue Jays and American-based teams continually crossing the U.S.-Canada border complicates the idea of hosting regular-season games.
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Best First Day school supply fundraiser starts early, expects increased demand due to COVID-19
Last year, the Best First Day drive delivered more than 3,800 backpacks filled with school supplies to students throughout the region.
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Less than 1% of coronavirus tests coming back positive in Waterloo Region
Waterloo Public Health says 3,532 coronavirus tests have been conducted in the area over the past week, with 21 coming back positive.
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The Raptors still have eight games before the NBA playoffs, but ‘everybody is ready’
The end-of-season schedule is tough, starting with LeBron James and the Lakers on Aug. 1, but the defending champions wouldn’t have it any other way.
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Tulsa, Okla., begins digging for mass graves nearly 100 years after race massacre
Historians believe around 300 people were killed In 1921 when white rioters descended on Greenwood District.
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