Raptors guard Terence Davis named to NBA’s all-rookie second team


Davis averaged 7.5 points and 3.3 rebounds while being the only player to appear in all of his team’s 72 games this season.
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Doug Ford’s Sept. 22 Ontario COVID-19 update: Live video
The premier addresses the province as it reports 478 new cases of the coronavirus The post Doug Ford’s Sept. 22 Ontario COVID-19 update: Live video appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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IATA calls for COVID-19 testing at airports, says quarantine 'killing' industry
About 83% of air travellers from 11 countries said in an IATA poll they wouldn’t fly if there was a chance of being quarantined at destination.
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Prince Andrew was 'sex addict' who bedded women found for him by Epstein, new book claims
Prince Andrew has no limits in the bedroom, according to one alleged former fling who outlines her claims in a new book from Canadian author Ian Halperin. Set to hit the Kindle Store on Thursday, ‘Sex, Lies And Dirty Money By The World’s Powerful Elite’ features testimonies from several women who say they were intimate with the prince, the Amazon synopsis for the book reads. “Most women painted Andrew as a perfect gent and said it was consensual,” Halperin told the New York Post’s Page Six . “One woman said he was a very daring lover: there were no limits to where he would go in bed.” The woman added she left disappointed because she never heard from the prince again after their encounter. Halperin, Page Six reports, spoke to at least a dozen women for his project. All said they had sexual relations with Andrew, he says, and some said they were introduced via the pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, who killed himself in a Manhattan jail cell last year. Sources close to Prince Andrew, the Daily Mail reports, have denied the truth of the allegations in the book, calling them “sensationalized” claims by women who refused to put their names to their stories. According to one woman who spoke to Halperin for the book, Prince Andrew developed a sex addiction and felt special, she said, being able to have attractive women in his room. “He compared his relationship with his brother … to William and Harry,” Halperin said. “William is looked at as royal material, just like (Prince) Charles, whereas he and Harry were the bad boys.” Halperin says that all through his investigations and interviews, he never found evidence that Prince Andrew was involved with underage girls, but said he expects the FBI to investigate Andrew due to his ties with Epstein. The prince has denied all allegations that he slept with anyone underage and that he was ever aware of any illicit activity by Epstein, saying their friendship was strictly business-focused. Andrew has been pressured to speak with U.S. authorities for months, but is yet to comply. Halperin, though, claims there is no doubt that Epstein provided women to the prince, and that’s why they were friends. “He had an obsession with redheads, and Epstein would have his scouts combing the streets for the most beautiful redheads before they met,” he told Page Six. Halperin alleges that Epstein had information on Andrew, and may have been prepared to use it against him. The two last met in 2011, he says, when the prince had to beg the financier to keep such information private. “If Epstein had a prince on his knees, imagine the power he had over others,” Halperin told Page Six. Halperin, born in Montreal, is an investigative journalist who’s book ‘Unmasked: The Final Years of Michael Jackson,’ became a #1 New York Times best-seller in 2009.
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Operation Clear Track going virtual this year for Rail Safety Week
Operation Clear Track, which happens annually during Rail Safety Week, aims to reduce the number of railway crossings and trespassing incidents in Canada and the U.S.
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Mask-wearing mandatory by Oct. 1 at Service New Brunswick centres
The province said Tuesday the mask-wearing order for Service New Brunswick centres will permit authorities to allow more people indoors at the same time.
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Rick Zamperin: Barring a disaster, Blue Jays are going to the MLB playoffs
Entering their game against the New York Yankees Tuesday night in Buffalo, the Toronto Blue Jays' magic number to clinch the American League's second wild-card playoff spot is three.
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Kingston city council to rethink municipal priorities due to COVID-19
Kingston city councillors will hold a special meeting this week with a mix of good and bad news in their ongoing budget battle against COVID-19.
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September 26 – Living Sounds Hearing Centre
Living Sounds Hearing Centre will be on Talk To The Experts this weekend!
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Popup schools: Marguerite-Bourgeoys procures two pre-fab 'nomad' units
Their design — 12 classrooms, a multi-purpose room and an office — provides an environment that more closely matches that of a conventional school.
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Tuesday marks the fall equinox. But what is it and how does it work? A planetary scientist explains
This year’s autumnal equinox will occur on Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern time, ushering in the winds of change, the cool temperatures of fall, and shorter days for everyone in the Northern Hemisphere — about 90 per cent of Earth’s population, according to Business Insider . The Southern Hemisphere experiences the opposite: spring’s hopeful beginnings and burgeoning warm weather. The equinox occurs each March and September, when both halves of the Earth experience nearly 12 hours of sunlight and 12 hours of darkness. On those days, Earth is angled in such a way as to receive a full face of sun. Both solstices — when the shortest and longest days of the year occur in the Northern and South Hemispheres — and equinoxes occur because of the axial tilt of the Earth, which is the degree of the planet’s tilt according to its North and South Poles relative to the sun. Dr. James O’Donoghue, a planetary scientist at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, recently posted an animation to explain how Earth’s angle and orbit creates the conditions for both equinoxes and solstices. It's Equinox in 1 hour! 22 Sep 2020, 13:30 UTC. Today everywhere has an almost** equal day and night length of 12 hours, while sunlight is at max intensity on the equator. Earth has seasons because of its axial tilt, which leads to day/night length changes throughout the year pic.twitter.com/L3pxQNFYnK— Dr James O'Donoghue (@physicsJ) September 22, 2020 The axis of the Earth — imagine a narrow column running from the North to the South Poles — isn’t exactly straight up and down. It’s about 23.5 degrees off, so different parts of the Earth get exposed to sunlight as the planet rotates around the sun. It’s why we have seasons and also why the Northern and Southern Hemispheres experience seasons at opposite times. As the Earth orbits the sun it also rotates on its own axis, keeping its heating relatively even. Imagine the slow turn of an enormous rotisserie chicken and you’ve got the general idea. The effects of the Earth’s axial tilt are most dramatic during the solstices, the two days of the year when one side of the planet is tilted farthest away from the sun and the other side is tilted towards the sun. On December 21, the winter solstice, the Northern Hemisphere has its shortest day of the year, receiving less than nine hours of sunlight, while the Southern Hemisphere has its longest, receiving more than 15 hours in the sun. In 2020, the summer solstice arrived on June 20, a day earlier thanks to the leap year calendar, heralding the start of summer and giving the Northern Hemisphere its longest day of the year while the Southern Hemisphere experienced its shortest. O’Donoghue explained on Twitter that during this day, “sunlight is most intense as it only has to pass through a short column of atmosphere.” That’s also why we have summer. It's Summer Solstice 20 June, 2020 at 21:44 UTC. The northern hemisphere is now exposed to sunlight for the longest duration *per day* and sunlight is most intense as it only has to pass through a short column of atmosphere – that's why it's hot! All thanks to Earth's axial tilt. pic.twitter.com/FVqQVRLUUf— Dr James O'Donoghue (@physicsJ) June 20, 2020 So the two times of the year when the Earth’s axis isn’t tilting strongly one way or the other, when it’s showing relatively “equal” amounts of planet toward and away from the sun, are the equinoxes. Both sides experience an equal 12 hours of day and night. If you happened to stand directly on the equator at 9:30 a.m. Eastern time on Tuesday, for a brief moment your shadow would look fairly unusual — at its absolute minimum, in fact — but the shadowless effect would be lost quickly thanks to our rotation around the sun at 66,600 mph. You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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3 active cases of COVID-19 remain in New Brunswick as of Tuesday
No new cases were reported.
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'Unfathomable': U.S. death toll from coronavirus hits 200,000
The U.S. death toll from the coronavirus topped 200,000 Tuesday, a figure unimaginable eight months ago when the scourge first reached the world's richest nation with its sparkling laboratories, top-flight scientists and stockpiles of medicines and emergency supplies.
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Both sexes are equally confined, but COVID-19 sees women do more household chores: study
COVID-19 confinement means more household chores and time with the kids. But despite both sexes being equally isolated, it looks like the lion’s share of the domestic duties are being handed to women, according to a newly-published study in the journal Gender, Work & Organization. With mass closures of schools and child-care facilities as a result of the pandemic, caregiving responsibilities have drastically expanded in households with parents who continue to work. As that has happened, mothers’ actual working hours — among those still gainfully employed — have dropped drastically compared to those of fathers. Researchers examined data gleaned from the U.S. Current Population Survey to compare the fluctuations and changes in working hours for mothers and fathers in heterosexual households. The data was gleaned from February to the end of April 2020, the period just before widespread U.S. outbreaks of the virus, and its first peak. The numbers revealed that among parents of young children, mothers had reduced their working hours between four and five times more than fathers during the period studied — increasing the pre-existing gender gap in work hours by another 20 to 50 per cent. “These findings indicate yet another negative consequence of the COVID‐19 pandemic, highlighting the challenges it poses to women’s work hours and employment,” the researchers write. “This is especially true for those with primary school‐age or younger children in the home for whom caregiving and homeschooling demands are most intense.” Ontario Premier Doug Ford to reveal fall COVID-19 plan as daily cases mount to 478 and three new deaths With CERB winding down, Ottawa starts tinkering with an engine of the economic recovery Researchers note that although the rise in telecommuting may have protected many mothers from “more extensive” job losses, mothers with children aged one to five reported significant work time reductions. This is despite the fact that the sample included couples where both parents telecommute and face similar working conditions. “Our results indicate that mothers’ employment is disproportionately affected relative to fathers’,” researchers write. “It is beyond the scope of this article to identify whether mothers’ work‐hour reductions are a consequence of their assuming a larger share of the domestic work… employers’ greater time demands on fathers than mothers, or whether in times of crisis families tend to revert to more traditional gender roles in the household division of labour. What is clear from robust government‐collected data is that the pandemic is driving mothers to scale back employment,” they add. While the study says long-term effects of the discrepancies between the sexes are as yet unknown, the authors suggest that employers can contribute towards turning the workforce into a more even playing field for both sexes. “To avoid long‐term losses in women’s labour force participation, employers should offer flexibility to keep mothers attached to employment, including allowing employees to work shorter hours,” the study concludes. “Further, fathers should be encouraged to provide more hours of care for their children, which may mean sacrificing paid work hours to do so. “Given the long‐term economic rewards associated with paid work, this article identifies one mechanism through which the pandemic is exacerbating gender inequalities.” You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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29 more coronavirus cases reported in Waterloo Region, most since early May
The last time the region saw this many new cases was on May 5.
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Quebec's pandemic messaging is a 'tower of Babel,' opposition charges
The three main opposition parties took turns saying it's easy to see why Quebecers are mixed up about the rules: Quebec keeps changing them.
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Union reaches tentative deal with Ford with nearly $2B in electric vehicle contracts
Workers had previously voted to support a strike if a deal could not be reached by that deadline, with the future of the Oakville, Ont. plant potentially on the line.
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200,000 dead, and still no plan to end America’s coronavirus crisis
As the U.S. hits a tragic new milestone in coronavirus fatalities, experts warn the country may be on track to hit 400,000 deaths by the end of the year.
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High school students at Catholic schools in Simcoe, Muskoka no longer allowed to leave for lunch
The school board's interim education director said many students who are going out for lunch are gathering in close proximity to one another without masks.
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Cancer mortality to rise in coming years because of pandemic: expert
"There are still a lot of patients who have not yet been diagnosed and that we don't know of," said cancer specialist Martin A. Champagne.
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Jerry Harris to remain in custody after arrest on child pornography charge
Breakout star of the Emmy-winning Netflix series “Cheer” who was arrested last week and charged with producing child pornography, will remain in custody, a court decided on Monday.
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It’s time for Ontario to get behind virtual health care — for good
COVID-19 has changed our world and we have an opportunity to do now what we failed to do in the wake of SARS. Our government can choose to move forward and make virtual care a fixture in our post-pandemic future by making fair telemedicine billing codes available to all Ontario physicians, permanently.
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High schools pivot to virtual open houses as COVID-19 cases increase
Families can watch as many open houses as they want from the comfort of their living room.
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Six O’Clock Solution: Middle Eastern dishes made easy by Sabrina Ghayour
This recipe for pomegranate molasses and honey-glazed meatballs is among more than 100 in the Tehran-born, London-based chef's book Simply: Easy Everyday Dishes.
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Ralph Lauren to cut jobs amid accelerated e-commerce push
The restructuring comes as Ralph Lauren struggles to cope with economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic like most clothing retailers, with sales dwindling over the past two quarters.
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Study on patients with kidney stones could lead to more personalized care: London researchers
'We hope this will be the first step towards personalized care, ultimately leading to fewer stent-associated infections.'
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Quebec sees 489 new coronavirus cases as hospitalizations jump by 20
Quebec reported 489 new cases of COVID-19. The total is 68,617.
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Global BC celebrates 60 years: Viral video moments from our history
As we celebrate 60 years of being on the air and in your community, we had a look back at some of the most viral moments.
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Active COVID-19 school-related cases in Ontario jump by 51
In its latest data released Tuesday morning, the province reported that 26 more students were infected for a total of 59. There were seven more staff members infected for a total of 33 and 18 more individuals for a total of 49.
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Ottawa sees 90 new COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record
Ottawa added 90 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, a new single-day record set as the city braces for its second wave of the pandemic.
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Day before throne speech, return of Parliament and voting plan still being sorted out
Parliament is coming back tomorrow, the leaders of the two largest opposition parties are in isolation due to COVID-19 infections, the national capital is experiencing a second wave of the virus, and MPs are still working out how the hybrid virtual sitting and voting will work.
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Taiwanese bird group is latest casualty in the battle for independence from China
A Taiwanese bird conservation organization has been removed from an international birding group, the latest casualty of what appears to be part of China’s larger campaign to pressure international organizations and delegitimize Taiwan. Earlier this month, the Chinese Wild Bird Federation, which is based in Taiwan, was cancelled as a partner organization by BirdLife International, a conservation organization with scores of members around the world. The Chinese Wild Bird Federation said in a statement posted to its website that BirdLife had demanded they change their name and commit to several demands involving abstaining from any political activity. “This has been an issue in a number of international organizations, always at the behest of China,” said Margaret McCuaig-Johnston, senior fellow at the Institute of Science, Society and Policy at the University of Ottawa. “Having Taiwan as an equal-member country in international organizations creates the impression that Taiwan is an independent country and that is not something that China wants to continue with.” The news from the bird world comes as Taiwan and China are in the midst of an escalating standoff as the democratic island seeks closer ties with the United States; dozens of warplanes and ships were in the Taiwan Strait over the weekend as Keith Krach, the United States under secretary of state for economic, energy and environmental affairs, was in Taipei for talks and for the Saturday memorial for former Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui. China has long-claimed jurisdiction over Taiwan and has been pushing for a one-country two-systems governance. Taiwan’s democratic government is rejecting reunification and recently changed its passport to minimize “Republic of China” in its official name. While birds, obviously, don’t care a whit for borders or geopolitics, conservationists in the region are becoming frayed by the tension. BirdLife International is a partnership of non-governmental organizations around the world, which “strives to conserve birds, their habitats and global biodiversity.” The Chinese Wild Bird Federation has been a BirdLife partner since 1996, they said. Australia comes to a stark realization: It must fend off China China steps up use of 'hostage diplomacy' in international relations: experts The issue between BirdLife and the Chinese Wild Bird Federation, according to a statement posted on the Taiwan birder group’s Facebook page, was that Taiwan-based group refused to sign documents “formally committing to not promote or advocate the legitimacy of the Republic of China or the independence of Taiwan from China.” They had also been asked to change their name — which they’d already done three times — and that the Chinese Wild Bird Federation were willing to discuss. “As an apolitical organization which has never taken a stance on any such issue, we felt it was inappropriate to sign such a document and were unable to comply. We are not political actors, we are conservationists,” the Chinese Wild Bird Federation said in its statement. China has often pressured international groups over Taiwan’s relationship, but usually on more prominent platforms, said McCuaig-Johnston. China has opposed Taiwan’s membership in, for example, the International Civil Aviation Organization, which co-ordinates air travel. Canada has backed Taiwan’s efforts to participate in ICAO,  based in Montreal, as an observer. “It’s a significant step, in my view, if China is taking the step to start to take these same measures two or three levels down in organizations in very specific areas to, again, freeze Taiwan out,” said McQuaig-Johnston. “In my view, that’s new and something to be rejected by other countries.” Scott Simon, an east Asia expert at the University of Ottawa, said this shows China’s ability to pressure international NGOs and, more broadly, China’s insistence that Taiwan is a part of the People’s Republic. “In the long run, it’s part of a bigger strategy … they’re trying to cut off Taiwan’s relationship with everybody,” said Simon. “They’re cutting off these relationships one by one.” According to a statement from the Chinese Wild Bird Federation, BirdLIfe International would not allow its logo to be used in any way that suggests affiliation with the Taiwanese government.  “It was explained that this was necessary since it would be ‘odd’ for BirdLife to distance itself from the ‘independence agenda’ of the Republic of China but to also benefit financially from the government of that entity,” the statement said. “Such a statement is clearly a political determination and one which should not be made by a global conservation organization such as BirdLife International.” BirdLife removed the Taiwanese bird watchers before the matter could be debated at a general meeting. BirdLife, which did not respond to a request for comment, has minimal relationships with China’s conservationists, and only one partner organization based in Hong Kong. “I think it really puts other international organizations on notice that they have to be prepared to stand up against this kind of pressure from China,” said McQuaig-Johnston. “This step this organization has taken didn’t come out of nowhere.” • Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter: tylerrdawson
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Expert says U.S. trends suggest Manitoba’s shoplifting rates also on the rise
Loss prevention expert Stephen O'Keefe told 680 CJOB the shrinkage rate in the United States grew to a record high last year.
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Hamilton’s Forge FC draws El Salvador side in CONCACAF League play
The Canadian Premier League champions will begin on the road against CD Municipal Limeno in October.
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Ottawa affirms Mi’kmaq treaty rights in Nova Scotia lobster dispute
Two ministers say they plan to work with Mi'kmaq leaders on the implementation of the First Nation's treaty right.
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Avoid trick-or-treating due to coronavirus this Halloween, CDC says
The U.S. CDC recommends finding ways to celebrate Halloween with people in your immediate household.
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FC Edmonton coach Jeff Paulus steps down, will stay on in player development role
The club says it has already started the search for a new head coach.
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Manitoba’s neighbour to the south, North Dakota, sees a surge in coronavirus cases
As of Tuesday morning, North Dakota, which has a population of about 760,000, has 3,210 active cases, bumping the state's total to 18,244 since the pandemic began.
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Waterloo enacts noise bylaw ahead of Laurier Homecoming Weekend
The temporary bylaw will see fines handed out if music is playing too loud Friday through Sunday of Homecoming weekend.
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Guelph’s downtown dining district extended through November
The dining district opened in July as a way for 17 restaurants in downtown Guelp to open up and serve diners outside during the COVID-19 pandemic. 
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