Regina City Council approves amendments to Taxi Bylaw

Industry stakeholders say the decision will allow taxis to employ a fare system similar to the one used by some ride share services.
Load more
Read full article on: globalnews.ca
Calgary’s caped crusader: An unsung superhero emerges amid COVID-19
"She’s just been a light during this dark time."
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Giants catcher Buster Posey opts out of 2020 season, cites newborn twins’ health
Posey made the emotional decision to opt out of the 2020 baseball season Friday after he and his wife Kristen adopted identical twin girls.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Tarion plan reveals reforms are still a work in progress
CEO says stronger consumer protections are needed to gain public confidence in the home warranty provider and building regulator.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Major wreck leaves vehicles unrecognizable on Perimeter Highway
A serious crash left two vehicles a mangled wreck on the Perimeter Highway near Fermor Avenue.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
First black Miss Universe became a national icon in Trinidad
When Janelle “Penny” Commissiong became Miss Universe in 1977, the world sat up and took notice. Commissiong, from the tiny island of Trinidad, was the first ever black Miss Universe — a hopeful sign and something to be celebrated far beyond pageant circles. Toronto resident (and former Much/City entertainment reporter) Nadine Ramkisson — a fellow […]
Toronto Sun
COVID-19 will change Maritime Pride festivals but it won’t cancel events: organizers
Although many events have been postponed or canceled due to the pandemic, Atlantic Pride festivals will continue with a hybrid of online and in-person events.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Heavy metal used by Co-op refinery detected in Regina wastewater
The refinery has made arrangements to have the vanadium-concentrated water hauled off-site for specialized treatment, says the City of Regina.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Hamilton mobster Pat Musitano shot dead in Burlington
Musitano, 52, was shot Friday afternoon on a Burlington street. The long-time mobster, formerly considered an Ontario lieutenant of Montreal mob boss Vito Rizzuto, survived an earlier attempt on his life last year.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Emma Teitel: With your help, children can regain some of their carefree spirit from the time before
There will be changes at camp, but it’s one of the only spaces where kids can get a small taste of what life was like before the pandemic hit, writes Emma Teitel.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
N.S. harm reduction advocates applaud police chiefs for stance on drug decriminalization
The Canadian Association of National Police chiefs has endorsed the decriminalization of simple possession of illicit drugs.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Alberta confirms 77 new COVID-19 cases on Friday
Seventy-seven more people in Alberta have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the province announced on Friday.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Canada Added 953,000 Jobs In June, Unemployment Rate Fell: StatCan
OTTAWA — Nearly one million more Canadians had jobs in June than a month earlier, Statistics Canada says, as businesses forced to close by the pandemic began to reopen and the country continued to recoup the steep losses over March and April.Statistics Canada’s labour force survey released Friday showed 953,000 jobs were added last month, including 488,000 full-time and 465,000 part-time positions. The unemployment rate fell to 12.3 per cent after hitting a record-high of 13.7 per cent in May.As in May, even though more people found jobs, more people were also looking for work as the labour force grew by about 786,000 after a gain of 491,000 in May, bringing it to within 443,000 of its pre-pandemic level.Statistics Canada said the unemployment rate would have been 16.3 per cent had it included in unemployment counts those who wanted to work, but did not look for a job.Job gains were made in every province, including by 378,000 in Ontario, marking the first increase since the COVID-19 shutdown, Statistics Canada said. It didn’t include any gains in Toronto as restrictions in that city loosened after the survey week.Despite the good news, economist Jim Stanford said there remains a historic crisis in the job market with high unemployment and hundreds of thousands who have left the labour force altogether.Also, gains nationally were not shared equally among groups, with women, youth and low-wage workers still slower to rebound, which Stanford said could be problematic if those jobs don’t ever come back.“I worry about a coming second round of layoffs motivated not by health restrictions, but by companies deciding their businesses are going to be permanently smaller. So that would be qualitatively different and in a way worse,” said Stanford, director of the Centre for Future Work in Vancouver.“We aren’t remotely out of the woods yet, but this was a really encouraging step forward.”Some three million jobs were lost over March and April due to the pandemic, and 2.5 million more had their hours and earnings slashed. By last month, some 3.1 million were affected by the pandemic, including 1.4 million who weren’t at work due to COVID-19.Brendon Bernard, an economist at Indeed Canada, said recapturing jobs at the same pace in the coming months will be tougher.“A lot of areas of the economy still aren’t running at full capacity,” Bernard said. “So while doors may be open and customers might be coming in, business hasn’t come back to normal.”Oil and gas still strugglingDespite the overall improvement, the oil and gas industry continues to struggle.The PetroLMI Division of Energy Safety Canada says direct oil and gas employment fell by more than 6,700 positions in June compared with May, with about 70 per cent of the net job losses in Alberta.Compared with a year earlier, employment in the oil and employment sector was down 17 per cent.The overall job losses were unprecedented in speed and depth compared with previous recessions, Statistics Canada said, and the rebound to date sharper than previous downturns.Ottawa’s response has been equally unprecedented: a deficit of at least $343.2 billion this fiscal year as the Trudeau Liberals dole out some $230 billion in emergency aid.In June, 28.3 per cent of Canadians aged 15 to 69 reported receiving some form of federal aid since mid-March, Statistics Canada said. Meanwhile, the proportion of households reporting difficulty paying the bills dropped to 20.1 per cent in June from 22.5 per cent in May.“Without the federal government being there to support Canadian workers, Canadian businesses and the Canadian provinces and territories, we would be in a bigger mess in this country right now,” Hassan Yussuff, president of the Canadian Labour Congress said in an interview this week.Canadians still ‘face real challenges’The Bank of Canada and federal government believe the worst of the economic pain from the pandemic is behind the country, but Canada will face high unemployment and low growth until 2021.In a statement, federal Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough touted the overall jobs numbers as a sign the government’s plan was working, before adding many Canadians still “face real challenges during this time.”She and other ministers are now reshaping programs so fewer workers stay on the $80-billion emergency benefit, and more get tied to jobs through the $82-billion wage subsidy program.“We understand the need for those emergency programs. We also understand as we reopen and recover, we have to move away from emergency programs and into stimulus and recovery,” said Leah Nord, senior director of workforce strategies for the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.She said there are other issues to resolve around health and safety in the workplace, transit, and child care to help more Canadians get back to work.RELATED CERB Is Coming To An End As Feds Focus On Wage Subsidy Canada’s Deficit Is 1,000% Higher Than Projected At Start Of 2020 Basic Income Could Cost Less Than Money Spent On CERB: Watchdog In provinces where daycares reopened for children five and under, employment levels returned to pre-pandemic levels for fathers in June, but not for mothers. Similarly, mothers with children under 18 were more likely than fathers to work less than half their usual hours in June, Statistics Canada said.Job gains have come at a faster clip for men. Their unemployment rate hit 12.1 per cent in June compared to 12.7 per cent for women. And the underutilization rate — which counts those who are unemployed, those who want a job but didn’t look for one, and those working less than half their usual hours — was 28.3 for women and 25.5 per cent for men.Economist Armine Yalnizyan said the numbers underscore the need to provide child care as well as options for schooling in the fall so mothers can work.The alternative, she said, could pull back any economic gains.“It means that even if there are jobs, some women won’t be able to take them because there’s no way they can leave their kids,” said Yalnizyan, a fellow on the future of workers at the Atkinson Foundation. “So we are looking at the potential for an economic depression instead of talking about paces of recovery and pivoting to building to better.”This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 10, 2020.
Huffington Post Canada - Canadian News...
Collin Morikawa builds big lead at Muirfield Village before storms
Morikawa ran off four straight birdies after making the turn Friday, finished with another birdie and shot 6-under 66 to build a four-shot lead over Sam Burns (66) in the storm-delayed tournament.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Five overlooked benefits of learning a new language
Adding another language to your skill set can improve your employability and boost your salary
Toronto Sun
More than two thirds of Ontarians think police treat Black and Indigenous people worse than others, poll finds
A staggering 90 per cent of respondents believe all Ontario officers should have mandatory body cameras with only five per cent opposed and five per cent unsure, a new poll finds.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Grocery store execs exchanged ‘courtesy’ calls before canceling coronavirus pay, MPs told
Three executives say the companies reached their decisions independently based on numerous factors that for some included knowing a competitor's plan.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Nine in 10 riders wearing masks despite lack of enforcement, says TTC
Social distancing becomes harder as the city begins to reopen and people start taking transit again.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
B.C. reports 25 COVID-19 cases, most since May 8
The province also announced one new fatality at Vancouver's Holy Family Hospital long-term care centre.
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
A city-by-city breakdown of how Canadians want to defund the police
The call to “defund the police” is reverberating through North American cities, and has prompted several major municipalities to move forward with extensive policing reforms, led by the $1 billion moved from the New York Police Department’s budget, and the commitment of nine city councillors in Minneapolis to dismantling and rebuilding the city’s police service. As a concept, defunding the police is not new, but reached new heights following protests worldwide after George Floyd was killed during his arrest in Minneapolis in May. What it means is less clear and hotly debated. For supporters, it means a more diversified approach to policing, and reallocating police budgets to other social services and support. For detractors, it means less police to protect people and their property. British Columbia Premier John Horgan called defunding a “simplistic approach.” Ontario Premier Doug Ford said: “I think we need strong police within the communities. What we do need to do is have a higher standard. We need for focus on more training.” Some Canadian cities have moved — with varying degrees of boldness — towards “defunding” more broadly, and reform more specifically. Here’s what’s happening across the country: British Columbia The province announced in June it would review its Police Act. On Wednesday, the B.C. government announced an all-party provincial committee would examine the scope of systemic racism as part of reforms to its 45-year-old bill governing how police operate in the province. Victoria will review the gender and ethnic composition of the police force in line with the general population. Police chief Del Menak is against funding cuts because he says police are already underfunded. In  Vancouver there have been multiple calls over the years to cut the city’s $340 million policing budget. But in May, the Vancouver Police Board couldn’t agree on a one per cent cut suggested by city council. Mayor Kennedy Stewart, who also chairs the police board, deferred to the province when it came to large scale reforms of cuts. “While many U.S. cities, including Minneapolis, can massively restructure its police, neither organizations which I chair can legally do this even if they wanted to,” he said. In Surrey, t he city has, since 2018, been working on creating a municipal police force to replace the RCMP. The new force will be up and running by Spring 2021. Former B.C. solicitor general Kash Heed says this is an opportunity to create a model police force, while others believe more officers are needed. Alberta In  Calgary , there are calls to shift funding from the $400 million police budget  — the single largest budget item in the city — to social services. “We’re not abolishing police. We just want a cap on their budget,” activist LJ Parker,  who’s with Calgary Supports Black Lives Matter,  told the Calgary Herald . Edmonton ‘s city council cut police spending  by $11 million over two years. This is less than three per cent of the $388 million police budget . The city announced 19 other police reform steps. The first will be a safety and well-being task force that will report back next year. Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe’s government has been working on body-worn cameras for police and an independent oversight body for police misconduct. Mayors and chiefs across the province, including in Regina,  have said the crime rate is too high to reallocate funds. “Our crime rate and our crime per capita in Saskatchewan and in Regina is one of the highest in Canada,” said Regina police Chief Evan Bray . “And yes, it goes right back to those social justice issues … but that presence and that need for our police officers to be able to do this meaningful work in our community is not going to go away,” Manitoba  Premier Brian Pallister said defunding the police is a no go. The province has a review underway of its police act. The chief of police in  Winnipeg  has spoken favourably about reducing police funding — if social services spending gets a boost from the province. The police do have a body camera program. The North In the  Northwest Territories  there have been calls to end the RCMP’s presence and replace it with Indigenous-led justice systems. The territorial justice minister, Caroline Wawzonek, claimed it’s not practical. In Nunavut,  there have been discussions about pilot projects such as body-worn videocams. Ontario Calls for police reforms escalated in Toronto recently following the death of Regis Korchinski-Paquet, a 29-year-old woman, who fell from her 24th-floor balcony when police responded to a 911 call. Others have been killed by police in the city, including Andrew Loku in 2015 and Sammy Yatim in 2013. At the end of June,  Toronto city council said no to defunding the police. Two councillors had argued for a $107 million cut to the budget for 2021. The current  budget is around $1.2 billion. Mayor John Tory has called for reforms, such as “non-police led response to calls which do not involve weapons or violence.” In  Ottawa,  some councillors have supported the idea of reallocating police funding, The current operations budget is $358 million. Chief Peter Sloly has said the force is committed to addressing biases within the force. Mayor Jim Watson, meanwhile, has  said he’s not in favour of cutting the police budget. Quebec Quebec’s Public Security Ministry has committed to looking into how funds could be moved from police to other services. In Montreal, 20 local community groups have called for a deep cutting of police funding, from $600 million to $300 million. Mayor Valerie Plante said she’s open to the discussion of how to reallocate funding, but said it would be a big and trying conversation. Atlantic Canada In  Halifax,  the city dropped its plan to purchase an armoured vehicle, and will reallocate the funds to public safety and fighting anti-Black racism, Global News reported. In Prince Edward Island, the Official Opposition made the case for reallocating police money, but in Charlottetown,  at least one councillor said they supported the police instead.  “There is no indication that we’re in a monetary crunch right now that would force us to defund or claw back or reduce staff,” councillor Bob Doiron told The Guardian. In New Brunswick, which is policed by a combination of municipal police forces and the RCMP, there are new calls for defunding. There were two police shootings in early June. Chantel Moore, a 26-year old Indigenous woman was killed by Edmundston police while they were conducting a wellness check Then, Rodney Levi, 48, of Metepenagiag First Nation, was shot and killed by RCMP on June 12. And, in  St. John’s, there have been defund the police rallies. With files from The Canadian Press and Postmedia Network 
National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
CFL submits revised financial request to federal government, source says
A CFL source said Friday the league is seeking roughly $42.5 million in aid. In April, it asked the federal government for up to $150 million in financial assistance in the event of a cancelled 2020 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Two North York women charged in connection with the murder of an alleged Liberian warlord last month
Bill Horrace of Toronto was shot to death shortly before 5 a.m. on Sunday June 21, after four men burst into the London home where he was staying.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
One dead, one wounded in broad daylight Burlington shooting
One person is dead and another is in hospital following a shooting in Burlington on Friday afternoon. Halton Regional Police say officers responded to reports of gunshots at an address on Plains Rd. E., west of King Rd., just after 1 p.m. When officers arrived, two victims with gunshot wounds were located outside of an […]
Toronto Sun
Elle Fanning on top of the world in ‘The Great’: ‘It was a gift that I got this’
Elle Fanning wasn’t deeply familiar with the story of Catherine the Great, the longest-reigning female ruler in Russia’s history. But quickly after she agreed to lead Hulu’s The Great, she learned there was more to the famed empress than the rumour she’d had sex with a horse. “I didn’t know much about her. I knew […]
Toronto Sun
‘The cruelty is staggering:’ U.S. deports migrants using coronavirus public health powers
Many have been swept up by Customs and Border Protection using extraordinary power available during public health emergencies to expel Mexicans and many Central Americans
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Hydro-Québec to extend preferential rate to hundreds of greenhouses
Producers of fruits, vegetables, flowers, plants and cannabis will benefit from the change.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Rally at Alberta legislature to protest Ethiopian government after singer killed
Protesters gathered in Edmonton to rally against an East African government
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Everyone needs heat relief, city says, even those isolating for COVID
The pandemic has complicated the public health response to the heatwave and forced some people to stay indoors in hot apartments.
Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
With WE charity, the Trudeau government is digging a deeper hole
The WE charity affair shows the prime minister needs strong people around him able to warn him off when he’s about to succumb to his worst instincts.
1 h
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
EDITORIAL: Trudeau should come clean to avoid Lavscam Part II
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has to come clean on everything to do with the WE contract. There is no reason for Trudeau or any operatives in the Liberal government to put our country through yet another Lavscam-style saga. That fiasco damaged Canada’s reputation. It caused vicious infighting among political circles. It also saw the unfortunate […]
1 h
Toronto Sun
Bylaw change could legalize homeless camping in Vancouver parks
The draft bylaw would limit tents from dusk to 8 a.m., and ban them near playgrounds and schools along with sports fields and a variety of other park features.
1 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Vlad Guerrero Jr. to switch from hot corner to first base
The first thing Charlie Montoyo wanted to make clear in announcing how Vladimir Guerrero Jr. will switch over to first base is that all options remain open. For the media mavens covering the team, Friday’s announcement by the jovial skipper amounted to some seismic event, the same day some grousing could be heard on the […]
1 h
Toronto Sun
Coronavirus: Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board favours every-other-day model for students
In an informal survey of parents, 40 per cent were in favour of an every-other-day model for students this fall.
1 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Man wounded in Scarborough Town Centre shooting
A man was seriously injured by gunfire at the Scarborough Town Center Friday afternoon. Toronto Police received multiple calls just after 2 p.m. regarding the shooting outside the mall southwest of McCowan Rd. and Hwy. 401. “When police arrived they located a man with a gunshot wound and he was transported to the hospital,” Const. […]
1 h
Toronto Sun
Missing man with dementia last seen in Winnipeg’s downtown, police say
Winnipeg police are asking for the public's help finding a missing man with dementia.
1 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Coronavirus: Toronto hospital brings dialysis to seniors in long-term care, retirement homes
"In the past it was not even clear why we couldn't, and here it is happening for the first time in a way that is very convenient for the patients and hopefully will save money and prevent the patients from getting sicker"
1 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
MALCOLM: Politicians are turning their back on Canada’s police
Politicians across Canada are turning their back on the men and women who risk their lives to keep our communities safe. Desperate to keep up with trendy protesters and the radical demands of the far-left, hapless officials from all levels of government have been scoring cheap political points by needlessly and baselessly denouncing Canadian police […]
1 h
Toronto Sun
Driver suffers life-threatening injuries in southeast Edmonton collision
Police were called to a two-vehicle collision at Ellerslie Road and 17 Street just before 2 p.m. 
1 h
Global News | Latest & Current News -...
This Directory Makes It Easy To Find Black Canadian Fashion Designers
To the untrained eye, it might seem like Black Canadian fashion designers didn’t exist until last month. Last month must be when they all materialized, because that’s when so many of them were curated into listicles and Instagram round-up posts that smacked of wonder and spritely discovery. In fact, last month also happens to be when protests against anti-Black racism broke out across the world — protests that prompted so many people to Google “Black-owned businesses” to support that the search term reached an all-time high throughout the United States. Finally, people are looking. And George Sully, the Toronto-based fashion entrepreneur and footwear designer, wants to ensure they find what’s been there all along.This week, Sully launched a website for the Black Designers of Canada (BDoC) index: a comprehensive, interactive directory of Black designers that aims to correct the way they’ve been marginalized, overlooked and underexposed throughout Canadian fashion and design history.It’s the first resource of its kind, and it includes not only fashion designers, but also accessory, graphic, interior, industrial, and furniture designers. “The point is to lessen the excuses that the industry often makes to justify excluding us,” Sully told HuffPost Canada, over a phone call. “When you’re looking at more than 130 of us on a webpage, it’s hard to say we don’t exist.”Watch: Krys Lunardo and George Sully discuss Black Designers of Canada with ET Canada. Story continues below.Sully has been working in the fashion industry for 15 years, and says racism has always been a systemic force he’s had to shadowbox. Securing bank loans, grants, and media attention is much tougher for Black designers, he says. (In fact, a recent report from the US Federal Reserve found that Black-owned firms are twice as likely to be rejected for bank loans — and COVID-19 might be exacerbating that situation.)And the problem often turns out to be cyclical: buyers refuse to bring Black Canadian fashion designers into stores because they claim those designers aren’t popular enough; by further omitting them from shelves, these designers fail to generate the exposure that would make them popular enough to be brought into stores. Sully, himself, has fallen prey to these patterns. He’s struggled with fashion magazines refusing to cover his brands, and then blaming those omissions on his absence from mainstream press, as though that indicates a lack of public interest. He’s even had buyers procrastinate on pulling from his lines and then, at the end of the season, claim they’re “out of budget” and can’t make any purchases. The cycles never end.“That’s all just a way for them to ignore us while maintaining plausible deniability,” Sully says. “We know how much Black people contribute to fashion and to culture. So where are the designers in the stores?”Sully is the co-founder of the minimalist shoe brand Sully Wong. He’s also the co-founder of House of Hayla, which specializes in monochromatic heels made with vegan materials. He’s the founder of Shoenado, a private label design consultancy. He’s the designer behind the iconic Starfleet Boot you’d have seen if you watch CBS’s Star Trek Discovery. And yet, for all his contributions to the industry, he says he’s rarely been archived, collected or written about. His story has not been told, and he hopes to end that pattern among other Black designers with this directory.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Black Designers of Canada (@blackdesignersofcanada) on Jun 3, 2020 at 9:02am PDTSully’s story is not uncommon — and it certainly isn’t unique to Canada. The fashion industry has long allowed racism to run unchecked, in the castings of models, the appointments of fashion designers, and in brands like Gucci and Prada releasing bewilderingly racist products. In fact, just last month, more than 250 Black fashion professionals signed a public letter addressed to the Council of Fashion Designers of America, accusing the organization of allowing “exploitative cultures of prejudice, tokenism and employment discrimination to thrive.”“We will no longer be relegated to the backseat, or worse yet, completely sidelined altogether,” the letter read, “we have ceased waiting indefinitely for others to grant us equal access to opportunity, locked out of the very rooms within which we should lead the collaborative work of righting those wrongs we endure.”When Sully announced his plans to develop the index early last month, and made a post about it on Instagram, submissions quickly began pouring in. A week after the callout went up, some 200 submissions had come through. And though people were elated that somebody had finally taken on the project of collecting the designers, it was also a painful clarification how they’ve all been sidelined.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Black Designers of Canada (@blackdesignersofcanada) on Jun 12, 2020 at 10:48am PDT“Looking through all of those submissions felt so dark,” Sully says. “It was a reminder of how many times that crime of omission has been done. It was just like, another one ... another one ... another one …”Sully hopes the BDoC directory will be used as an official resource for buyers, local boutiques, photographers, as well as the stylists who have the power to set trends in the glossy magazines they work with. “For the first time, it seems like Canada is owning up to and acknowledging its racist history,” Sully says. “Hopefully, now we can start doing something about it.”RELATED Harper’s Bazaar’s New Editor Is Canadian And Ready To Shake Things Up Ex-Aritzia Employees Call Out Company's Anti-Black Racism Black-Owned Green Fashion And Beauty Brands You Can Support Right Now
1 h
Huffington Post Canada - Canadian News...