COVID-19 restrictions lead to ‘stressful’ delays for people with furnace problems
Albertans could be waiting longer for furnace parts. A shortage has been brought on by COVID-19 distancing restrictions at factories in the U.S.
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Ian Mulgrew: Medicare injunction sought
“The prohibition of private surgeries will have devastating consequences for these patients, unnecessarily prolonging their pain and disability, increasing their risk of deterioration and possible permanent harm.”
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Strathcona community leader says she was beaten with a pipe
"They think they can come and they can shut me up? I will never shut up" — assault victim Katie Lewis believes she was targeted for her views on tent city in Strathcona Park.
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Federal minister criticizes RCMP response in lobster fishery dispute as more officers dispatched to intervene
OTTAWA — After a week of violence and arson, the federal government is sending more RCMP officers to Nova Scotia in a bid to restore calm as tensions rise over lobster fishing and Indigenous rights. But the federal Indigenous Services Minister has criticized the police response thus far, saying the Mounties have failed to protect the Indigenous fishermen. “We must also recognize that once again as evidenced by the scenes of violence, Indigenous people have been let down by the police, those who are sworn to protect them,” Marc Miller said in a news conference Monday. “The protection of people on both sides has to prevail, and clearly that has not been the case up until now.” Fishermen from the Sipekne’katik First Nation in southwestern Nova Scotia have been targeted in recent weeks, accused of threatening the sustainability of the lobster fishery. Since September they have been fishing outside of the commercial lobster season. More than 20 years ago, the Supreme Court recognized First Nations have a treaty right to fish for a “moderate livelihood,” subject to reasonable regulations. Commercial fishermen say the Indigenous fishermen are ignoring the regulations and they have pulled their lobster traps from the water. Last week, Sipekne’katik First Nation Chief Mike Sack was assaulted, a van belonging to an Indigenous fisherman was set ablaze and a large lobster processing facility was burned to the ground. Miller said the violence has to stop and the government stands with First Nations who have a right to fish. “No act of violence will prevent Canada from upholding that right, nor from the Mi’kmaq people from exercising that right,” he said. “It’s a disgrace to see these threats and acts of intimidation and violence taking place in this country.” Video footage has shown RCMP officers appearing to stand by as protesters vandalized property. Miller said that is unacceptable. Public Safety Minister Bill Blair said there is a need for significant reform to how police work in Indigenous communities. “I do acknowledge that there are concerns within Indigenous communities,” he said. “We’re working hard to resolve them.” Officers from neighbouring Atlantic provinces would be moving into the province in what Blair described as a “peacekeeping operation.” “These officers are conducting supplemental uniform patrols to high-risk areas, maintaining a strong presence to maintain the peace. The officers have access to an RCMP vessel, and they’re able to patrol on the water in areas where they are required.” Blair said the police laid charges in the van arson, as well as the assault on Sack. He said a person of interest had been identified in the lobster pound fire, but they are recovering from severe burns. Blair said police on the ground have been doing their job, following up and investigating crimes and holding those responsible to account. “it is not always possible to prevent every act of criminality, but people will be held to account and we have now ensured that they have adequate resources to do all that is possible and necessary to maintain the peace.” Sack said he welcomes the RCMP’s presence, but does worry they still won’t be enough. “If hundreds of people show up. I don’t think what they have in the area will contain that,” he said. “Our frustration is that somebody could have been hurt.” Sack said his community’s small fishery is no threat to the commercial fishery. He said his community wants the access they won in the Supreme Court decision decades ago. He said they’re happy to talk with commercial fishers, but the issues should be resolved between the First Nation and the federal government. “We’re open to having discussions with commercial fishermen, but they’re not included in their talks with the government.” Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan said the issue has been ignored for far too long and the government is working hard to address the problem. “We’re here because our country operated for centuries without considering First Nations’ rights. We built up whole systems and structures, without considering them.” Jordan said she wouldn’t negotiate in public, but the government was working toward a resolution. An emergency debate on the issue was to be held in the House of Commons on Monday evening. Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole said the government has dithered on the file and is reacting only in a crisis. “Instead of sending in negotiators a month ago the government has to send in police officers,” he said in the House of Commons. “When will the minister finally do her job, before more people get hurt.” Colin Sproul, president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association, said he and his group condemn the violence. He said the federal government is responsible for this situation because it has failed to enforce fishery regulations. “In their desperation to try and get legitimate, final reconciliation of Mi’kmaq rights to fish, the government stopped enforcing existing fishery laws in Nova Scotia during the last three years,” he said. He said sending more officers won’t solve the problem if politics prevents them from enforcing the rules. “It’s beyond, beyond reprehensible, that they’re still saying at this point, well we’re just going to send more law enforcement down here to Nova Scotia.” Sproul said they support the right of Indigenous people to fish, but they have to respect regulations. He said fishing out of season will do considerable damage to the fishery. “We respect and support indigenous fishery rights. This is not what it’s about. It’s about sustainability.” Jordan insisted her government won’t compromise on good fishery management. “We are seeing right now we do have a very healthy stock, and we’re going to continue to make sure that that’s the case.” Sack said his community is putting a few hundred traps in the water, while the commercial industry puts hundreds of thousands. He said they have no intention of hurting the sustainability of the industry. “We will work with the government on a nation to nation basis, but as of right now, our main focus would be to ensure conservation and to ensure that the lobster industry is there for seven generations to come.” • Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com | Twitter: ryantumilty
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Clients at Lethbridge Soup Kitchen receive flu shots as provincial rollout begins
On Monday, as the province rolled out flu shots for all, one Lethbridge pharmacist made sure that included clients at the Lethbridge Soup Kitchen. 
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Senior SQ officer on loan to Quebec police watchdog as it looks to optimize communications
Effective Oct. 26, Chief Inspector Guy Lapointe will be reporting to the BEI.
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Piikani Travel Centre seeks help from Alberta Transportation
“[It will bring] that Blackfoot culture to the people that drive by our reserve... to understand our people and understand who we are."
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Lamborghini driver involved in fatal 2018 Richmond Hill crash pleads guilty
A 41-year-old King City, Ont., man has admitted to dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing the death of his fiancé, 32-year-old Katarzyna Tucholska.
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Coronavirus: Quebec dance academies say government has left them out in the cold
Quebec's dance schools were upset when the government announced $70 million toward sports organizations, and none for them.
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Jason Kenney’s UCP Voted To Support Privatized Health Care. Here’s What That Means.
Is American-style health care on the horizon in Alberta?That thought was on some people’s minds over the weekend as premier Jason Kenney’s governing United Conservative Party passed a controversial health policy at the party’s virtual AGM.Fifty-two per cent of the party’s membership voted in favour of supporting “the option of a privately funded and privately managed health-care system.”The phrase “privately funded health-care system” is bound to set off alarm bells for many Albertans, especially as Kenney’s government continues to slash  the budget of the public sector, with doctors leaving the province en masse and the government announcing cuts of about 11,000 health-care jobs last week. This follows the passing of an omnibus bill this summer that opens up Alberta’s health system for even more private influence. WATCH: Alberta cutting 11,000 health jobs. Story continues below.  But is this latest policy directive a green light for a complete overhaul of the province’s public health-care system? Not quite, says University of Calgary associate professor Lorian Hardcastle who specializes in health-care policy and law. But the policy is still cause for concern, if you value the current system.Here’s what you need to know.What did the UCP vote on this weekend?The party held its annual general meeting this weekend virtually over Zoom, which allowed members to gather and vote on various proposals it would adopt for future policies and election platforms.One was the option to support privately funded, privately delivered health care. Hardcastle says the policy directive means the government supports the idea of creating alternative health-care channels in the private space — something proponents are calling a “private tier system.” “Under this proposal, individuals would be able to pay out of pocket, or to take out private health insurance, in order to pay for the cost of the services,” she said. “In essence, we would be taking an area of the health-care system that is entirely publicly funded and we would be introducing private funding into those services.”So that’s American-style health care, right?Not so fast. Hardcastle noted that nowhere in the policy or any communications from Kenney and the government did they indicate they plan on ditching the public system. Rather, if put into effect, this policy could create two streams of health care in the province — one private, and one public.RELATED Canadian Support For Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccine Drops Dramatically: Poll Feds 'Urgently' Need To Make Private Nursing Homes Public After COVID-19 Outbreaks Will A New Law Bring 'American-Style' Health Care To Alberta? “There would still be that universal system, you could just, in parallel to that, buy quicker access,” she said. “It’s very similar to education — we have a universal public education system, but you can pay if you want to go to private school.” She said it’s difficult to make direct comparisons with other countries, because every situation is different. The UCP proposal is more in line with the United Kingdom or Australia, for example, than the fully private American system. Public health care is still there, but Albertans might be able to pay to access better or faster services, and medical professionals can choose which system to work in.Why is that still concerning if you value public health care? Hardcastle says the directive opens the door for inequity in health care, where those with more money have faster and better access to important services.“There’s already a link between wealth and health, where those who are wealthier already tend to be healthier,” she said. “And so if we allow those healthier people to buy quicker access to care, then that just exacerbates those inequities between the health status of the wealthy and the poor.”There would still be that universal system, you could just, in parallel to that, buy quicker access.University of Calgary associate professor Lorian HardcastleShe says a private system could pull doctors and other expertise away from the public system if they can make more money on the private side. She pointed to issues with other private tier health systems, like in Australia and the U.K., where governments have had to step in and regulate where and how doctors work.“So the concern isn’t that there won’t be a public health-care system, it’s just what will the quality of that system be? And how will the parallel private system negatively affect it?” she said.Can they actually do this? Hardcastle says she’s been fielding countless questions in the days since the vote regarding possible legal barriers to the UCP actually doing this.She says “there really isn’t a lot to legally prevent this.”Many people pointed to measures in the Canada Health Act as a possible barrier to the UCP implementing this directive, she said. But nothing in the act stops provinces from implementing policies like this, according to Hardcastle. RELATED Alberta To Slash Up To 11,000 Health-Care Jobs During Pandemic Kenney Says Alberta Won’t ‘Enforce Its Way Out’ Of Second Wave Is Pandemic Unity Between Ottawa And The Provinces Starting To Slip? (Analysis) “The Canada Health Act, it also doesn’t prohibit a province from having private financing and health care,” she said. “What it does do, though, is that if a province decides to have privately financed health care, their transfer payments from the federal government might be subject to deductions.”Hardcastle said many people have asked about a recent precedent-setting case in the B.C. Supreme Court, which ruled against privately delivered health services.But that case determined provinces can limit private health care, not that they can’t support it themselves.“So in essence, B.C. wanted to limit private health care and that decision was upheld by the courts,” she said. “But if Alberta adopted this, they would not want to have those limits. And so the B.C. case doesn’t bar them from having a parallel privately funded health-care system.”What did Kenney say about it?Regardless of a shift to private health care in Alberta, the policy directive does go against Kenney’s much-publicized “public health guarantee,” which he made following the 2019 election, pledging to keep the public health system intact.On Sunday, Kenney’s press secretary Christine Myatt issued a statement noting that the government does not plan to enact policies passed this weekend immediately, and the government will continue to govern on its 2019 mandate. “Policy resolutions passed this weekend will help inform the development of the 2023 electoral platform.”During a radio interview Monday, Kenney said his party made an “unqualified commitment” to publicly funded, universally accessible medicare.“That is not the U.S. system,” Kenney said. He argued that the policy directive is about giving Albertans “more choice” in how they access health care.“There should be more choices and more options,” he said. What happens next?While Hardcastle says private insurance is “a ways off” in Alberta because a whole industry would have to form, the UCP could start repealing specific laws that prevent the delivery of private health care in the province. “Alberta law limits, for example, private insurance for publicly insured services. Alberta law also limits what’s called extra billing, in which doctors both bill the government for seeing you and then charge you on top of that,” she said. “So really, the big thing would be to make those changes to Alberta’s legislation where it limits private finance.”She said Kenney and the UCP will also have to be prepared to negotiate with the federal government on the issues of federal health funding and transfer payments.“Sometimes those conversations happen before the fact; sometimes those conversations happen after the fact,” she said. “So Alberta could plow ahead and then later see what the financial consequences would be if they wanted to.”
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Parents ask Alberta government to allow in-person therapy for children with special needs
The pandemic has meant the cancellation of in-person therapy for many young Alberta children. Some parents want that style of service to resume.
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Queen's University strips Sir John A. Macdonald name from law school building after two month study of issue
Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., has stripped the name of Canada’s first prime minister from the building that houses its law school, and on Monday, the school’s board of trustees approved the decision, saying it came about following two months of consultations. Those consultations resulted in feedback from more than 3,000 “members of the Queen’s community,” which were then put into a 65-page report by an advisory committee that recommended the name Sir John A. Macdonald no longer grace the building. The report said the committee “consistently heard from Indigenous, racialized and marginalized groups that the current name of the law school building creates feelings ranging from exclusion to trauma.” “Our recommendation is based on the terrible harm Sir John A. Macdonald’s actions, from a position of the highest possible leadership, had on generations of people,” the report said. The university will, at some point, come up with a procedure to rename the building. In a separate note to those in the law school, dean Mark Walters conceded, “this decision will be very troubling, and even incomprehensible, for some of you,” but encouraged observers to read the report to understand the decision. “To remove the Macdonald name from the building is not to condemn Macdonald’s character or to dismiss his contributions to Canada,” Walters wrote. “Removing Macdonald’s name from the law school building may be seen as one small way of honouring the underlying values that animate the constitution that Macdonald helped to frame.” The legacy of Sir John A. Macdonald has been a focal point for a reckoning over Canada’s history. While Macdonald indeed presided over Canada’s foundation, he also was responsible for racist policies towards Indigenous peoples and other groups. Condemnation for 'mob' that pulled down statue of Sir John A. Macdonald in Montreal Here is what Sir John A. Macdonald did to Indigenous people Sure, John A. Macdonald was a racist, colonizer and misogynist — but so were most Canadians back then Statues of Macdonald in his hometown of Kingston, Ont., and in Montreal, have been vandalized in recent months. Irate Macdonald defenders have also stormed public squares, condemning the reconsideration of his historical legacy. Bruce Pardy, a law professor at Queen’s, recently wrote in the National Post about Macdonald’s rewritten legacy. “The test for tearing down statues and cancelling historical figures has become whether their values and behaviour conform to modern progressive sensibilities,” Pardy wrote. “Only monuments to the likes of Castro, Lenin and Mao have a shot at satisfying that criterion.” Many of those who wrote to the Queen’s committee about the statue expressed concerns about erasing history or argued that Macdonald’s views weren’t that out of step with the time. Some condemned “virtue signalling.” “This is a tactic employed throughout history by despots and dictatorships,” said one alum, from 1988. Another, a 1990 graduate, said “I oppose cleansing of history to satisfy a leftist-leaning radical minority agenda.” Others wrote of Macdonald’s legacy. Sean Carleton, a historian at the University of Manitoba, said, “he was a father of confederation but he was also an architect of Canada’s genocide against Indigenous peoples.” Another, who will graduate in 2021 from arts and sciences, said “Macdonald is the reason many of my ancestors, including my grandmother, attended residential school. “It is absolutely and wildly inappropriate to continue to celebrate this vile man on campus and then tell students you support reconciliation. Actions speak far louder than words,” the student wrote. • Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter: tylerrdawson
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Marie-Philip Poulin, Hockey Canada lend hand to 400 kids in Quebec
"The pandemic affected families mentally and physically and this will help some kids get back on the ice," Poulin says of $1-million fund.
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Kingston group rallies in solidarity with Mi’kmaq lobster fishers: ‘It’s time to step up’
A group of about 15 formed up at McBurney Park just past 11:30 a.m., making its way to Kingston City Hall.
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‘There’s no help’: Older, rural Canadian men dying by suicide, new study reveals
"When we speak to our rural colleagues, they tell us this is a day-to-day practice." 
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Ontario allows dance studios in COVID-19 hot spots to reopen
Ontario Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture Minister Lisa MacLeod made the announcement on Twitter Monday evening.
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Elon Musk's SpaceX gets CRTC application approval for Starlink satellite internet
Elon Musk's SpaceX moved closer to launching its Starlink high-speed satellite internet service in Canada after the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission approved the company's application for a licence.
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Tory Push For 'Anti-Corruption Committee' Could Spur Election, Liberals Warn
OTTAWA — The minority Liberal government suggested Monday the Opposition Conservatives are pushing the country to the brink of an election with their potential demand for an “anticorruption” committee to probe COVID-19 spending. Liberal House leader Pablo Rodriguez said in a letter to his opposition counterparts that the Tories’ effort to strike the committee is “blatantly partisan,” and designed to paralyze the government. “If passed, it will raise serious questions about whether the House of Commons continues to have confidence in the government,” he wrote. Rodriguez’s letter comes as the Tories were still deciding which of three potential subjects they’ll put up for debate Tuesday during one of the regularly scheduled days on the parliamentary calendar devoted to opposition business. The committee proposal is one option. It would incorporate ongoing efforts to scrutinize the Liberals’ decision to farm out management of a COVID-19 aid program to WE Charity, known for its long-standing ties to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s family.RELATED Liberals Spend Hours Filibustering Attempts To Reopen WE Charity Probes Trudeau Dismisses Tory Push For Anti-Corruption Committee To Probe WE Scandal Kielburgers Say WE Lost $5M After Scrapped Deal With Ottawa Trudeau Doesn't Seem To Know 'Basic' Conflict Of Interest Rules: Expert Another is about China’s imposition of a national security law on Hong Kong, and a third relates to banning the Chinese telecom firm Huawei from Canada’s networks. Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre laughed off Rodriguez’s suggestion that the creation of a committee ought to push Canadians to the polls. “Is he really suggesting that if the committee looks into Trudeau’s corruption, Trudeau’s just going to call an election? Is that really what he’s going to do?” Poilievre asked Monday. “Setting up a committee is not a matter of confidence.”Poilievre suggested his party is ready to do whatever it takes to hold the Liberals to account over the WE matter, but the Conservatives were also waiting on the Liberals’ own pitch on a special COVID-19 spending committee. Rodriguez laid out details of that as well Monday, proposing a 12-member committee where government and opposition MPs would have an equal number of spots.That’s roughly in keeping with the standings in the full House of Commons, but rounded in the Liberals’ favour.Setting up a committee is not a matter of confidence.Conservative finance critic Pierre PoilievreAmong other things, the Tories want the Opposition to have more seats.The NDP’s Charlie Angus said Monday he has concerns the Liberal approach could just result in the government stonewalling that committee in the same way they’ve filibustered others in recent days. But Angus said it would be reckless for the government to push Canadians to the polls, and he’s hoping cooler heads prevail. “Our message to the Liberals is calm down, we have work to do. Work with us.”For the Conservatives’ motion to pass over Liberal objections, it will need the support of the NDP and Bloc Québécois. Last week, several parliamentary committees were forced to sit for hours as the Liberals sought to block the resumption of studies into a decision to award WE Charity a contract to run a COVID-19 student program. The ethics committee spooled back up Monday, where opposition MPs are trying to get more details on how much Trudeau and members of his family received in speaking fees in connection with not just WE but for attending other events.How two disclosures earlier Monday, one by WE Charity and the other by the Liberals, will affect that effort wasn’t immediately clear. Watch: Trudeau says fate of WE Charity ‘unfortunate’. Story continues below.WE Charity released dozes of pages of documents that had previously been demanded by the finance committee, including details of fees paid to, and expenses covered for, members of the Trudeau family who participated in WE events. The charity had previously said Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the prime minister’s wife, had been paid a $1,500 speaking fee for one appearance, and the documents released Monday also disclosed that the charity covered $23,940.76 in expenses for eight appearances between 2012 and 2020. Meanwhile, in his letter Monday, Rodriguez released how much Trudeau himself had made via speaking engagements between 2006 and 2012. That data had been demanded by the opposition, though many of the details were put into the public domain seven years ago when Trudeau was running for the leadership of the Liberals. In 2013, he disclosed that he’d made about $1.3 million speaking fees, which corresponds to the data Rodriguez released Monday.The revelation, however, that WE Charity, via a speaking agency, had paid Trudeau’s mother and brother to attend events was one of several factors that forced Trudeau to conclude he should have recused himself from the decision to award WE the COVID-19 grant.In turn, MPs wanted the speaking agency to turn over all the records of how much Trudeau family members have been paid in total. The Liberals continued to insist Monday that how much his family has made is off limits.It was a point the NDP appeared to concede as Angus sought to narrow the ethics committee’s request to records related only to the prime minister and his wife. Angus said if the committee could agree to that, then it could move onto what he considered the bigger issue: how WE Charity got the contract in the first place. The Liberals have maintained there was nothing nefarious or corrupt in the decision, and it was made upon the recommendation of the public service, which is also WE Charity’s position. This report by The Canadian Press was first published October 19, 2020.
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Edmonton man who sold fentanyl causing fatal overdose tells court he’s a victim too
An Edmonton man who sold a mix of fentanyl and meth to a man who later died of an overdose says he is a victim of drug addiction himself.
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Orillia man charged with arson following early morning crime spree
According to OPP, the man set fire to an address on Regent Street Saturday morning.
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Meet the groups trying to turn Republicans away from Donald Trump
Hundreds of Americans are supporting a political action committee called Republican Voters Against Trump, which is trying to convince Republicans it’s OK to vote against the party.
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Pro soccer baptism came at trying time for Impact teen Luis Binks
'You lose track of time,' Englishman says after being confined to a hotel, alone, for weeks after arriving in Montreal just before the coronavirus pandemic.
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A sleeping pill temporarily helped a man talk for the first time in 8 years
A Dutch man who could not move or talk for eight years due to a serious brain injury, spontaneously started to chat with his family for a temporary period after being administered a sleeping pill, according to a case report.
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B.C. election 2020: Liberals fight to keep seat in Boundary-Similkameen
With the two-term Liberal MLA in Boundary-Similkameen retiring, the seat is up for grabs.
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Kelowna man charged with possession of stolen property after police recover senior’s swiped Buick
Police say the Buick Verano was stolen from a parking lot during the afternoon, but that it was recovered just before midnight.
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Flu shot clinics open across Saskatchewan
The Emerald Park Shoppers Drug Mart is one of 691 locations across the province now offering the flu shot, according to the Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA). 
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Winnipeg police investigating vehicle in the Red River near St. Vital Bridge
A police spokesperson said the vehicle was found in the water near Churchill Drive and Osborne Street.
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Canadian Civil Liberties Association appealing decision upholding N.L. travel ban
The province's travel ban restricted entry for non-residents unless they'd been granted a special exemption.
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Quebec schools concoct new recipes for a pandemic-safe Halloween
"We're very aware it's possible school is the only place where this holiday can be celebrated with friends."
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Western University law students volunteer to provide access to justice as pandemic raises barriers
The Western University chapter of Pro Bono Students Canada (PBSC) is seeing an increased interest from law students looking to volunteer.
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Parties keep close eye on Courtenay-Comox in election equation
Narrow NDP win in 2017 was pivotal in forming minority gov't.
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B.C. officials assess tsunami risk following Alaska earthquake
A earthquake of magnitude 7.5 struck south of Alaska's Aleutian Islands on Monday, triggering a tsunami warning for the area
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Alberta reports 898 new cases of COVID-19, 4 additional deaths since Friday
Alberta recorded 311 new cases of the coronavirus on Friday, 231 on Saturday and 356 on Sunday, according to Alberta Health. 
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In Tampa Bay, a plan just might be coming together
The Buccaneers’ 38-10 victory Sunday doubled as validation of an admission they made in the off-season and the commitment they demonstrated to correct it.
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‘The next I know the front of my shirt was red’: Young sisters describe horror of being shot in a Toronto playground
Gunman T’Quan Robertson apologized in court on Monday, saying “what I did was horrendous.” He is due to be sentenced later this month.
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Team McEwen lead Hodgson turns to curling roots as he prepares for return
Colin Hodgson is going to play in a local curling league this season for the first time in years.
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N.B. police renew public appeal for information in writer RM Vaughan’s disappearance
A respected figure in Canada's LGBTQ arts scene, Vaughan's bibliography spans poetry, novels, plays and essay collections.
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Tsunami warning issued for Alaska after 7.5-magnitude earthquake
As of 5:15 p.m. ET, officials were evaluating whether there is a risk to residents of British Columbia.
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Susan Delacourt: How badly has the WE scandal hurt Justin Trudeau? Two Toronto by-elections may offer clues
There are a number of reasons why next week’s votes in Toronto Centre and York Centre are significant political events in a very tumultuous year, Susan Delacourt writes.
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Training wrapping up for Lethbridge’s newest firefighter recruits
Twelve new recruits are in their final week of training to become the newest firefighters in Lethbridge.
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U.S. charges Russian intelligence officers in major cyberattacks
Prosecutors said the suspects were from the same Russian unit that conducted one of the Kremlin’s major operations to interfere in the 2016 U.S. election, the theft of Democratic emails.
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Leave my neighbours alone, Doug Ford tells anti-mask protesters
Irritated by demonstrators who have been rallying outside his Etobicoke home on Saturdays, the premier is asking them to take their protests elsewhere.
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