Mafia experts say Burlington, Ont., shooting death of Hamilton’s Musitano ‘not suprising’
A pair of well known organized crime authors weigh in on the nature of the fatal shooting in Burlington on Friday afternoon.
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Dr. Robert Filler, surgeon who played key role in starting Herbie Fund in Toronto, dies
By Araminta Wordsworth The name of Dr. Robert Filler, who died in Toronto on July 2, 2020, will forever be coupled with that of Herbie Quinones. The New York boy was born with a rare birth defect, a windpipe compressed between his esophagus and a major artery. This made it difficult for him to breath, but the operation to fix the problem was equally rare — and the boy’s parents, Herbie Sr. and Leticia Quinones, could not afford the life-saving surgery. Enter Dr. Filler. In 1979, when Herbie was still a baby, he was the head of pediatric surgery at the Toronto Hospital for Sick Kids. He offered his services to the Quinones family or free. That still left the cost of travel to Toronto and Herbie’s hospital stay, however, until a photo of the seven-month-old on a newspaper front page caught Gina Godfrey’s eye. “I was pregnant with my third child so the picture resonated,” she says. She and Paul Godfrey, then Chairman of Metro Toronto (currently Executive Chair of Postmedia, the company that owns the National Post), started fund-raising, and by February that year, Herbie came to Toronto for his surgery. “I am working today. I am a foreman for a mechanical company and I love it,” Quinones told the Toronto Sun on a visit to the city to celebrate the 40th anniversary of his successful operation. In the end, the publicity generated by Herbie’s case embarrassed authorities in New York into paying the parents’ expenses. This left the Godfreys with an enviable problem: a $17,000 surplus. Thus a new foundation, named after Herbie, was born. In the early years, Dr. Filler’s wife, June, took on the fund-raising from the basement of Sick Kids. Today, the foundation has helped more than 800 disadvantaged children from around the world. As a surgeon, one of Filler’s specialties was separating conjoined twins. He was involved in eight such procedures. In addition, he pioneered telemedicine, enabling doctors to treat patients at a distance, and predicted robots could be used to operate in this way. “He was brilliant but humble,” said Pauline Menkes, a family friend. “He was a wonderful figure in medicine.” Robert Martin Filler was born on March 3, 1931, in Brooklyn. N.Y., the eldest son of Barnet Filler and Lilian Cohen. His father had emigrated from Russia, while his mother was a native New Yorker. From about the age of 12, the young Filler wanted to be a doctor. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Cornell University, then enrolled at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., graduating cum laude. But he still had no idea what specialty to pursue, so he asked his parents. “My family told me, ‘Surgeons have a better life, they receive more glory,’” he said in an interview with Maclean’s magazine in 1984. What followed set him on a path that changed his life and those of countless patients — he was drafted as an army surgeon in Vietnam, working in a M.A.S.H. unit. Surprisingly, it wasn’t that busy, so in his spare time, Filler volunteered with a leper colony and at local hospitals. Much of his work consisted of treating children, repairing cleft palates, a common disability in the area. After his military service, Filler was tapped to become chief of clinical surgery at the Children’s Medical Hospital in Boston and an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School. While in Boston, Filler met June Risman, a graduate of Boston University and grade school teacher. “When he moved to Boston, he was told there were cute twins [called June and Joan] he should look up,” said Menkes. “When he called the number he had been given, June answered the phone and the rest is history.” The couple married in 1957 and had three children, Stephen, Richard and Larry. Despite his busy professional life, Filler had “a strong sense of family and ethics,” said Stephen, now a lawyer in New York. “He always knew what was the right thing to do.” His parents embraced Canada and the community they found in Toronto, becoming “proud Canadians,” said their youngest son, Larry. Filler was something of an introvert though he was quite sociable. “He never called anyone,” said Larry. “My mom made the arrangements.” His dad also loved to read, especially U.S. history and politics. In his later years, he took up golf and was an avid sports fan. June died in 2017. Filler is survived by their three sons and eight granddaughters. Though none of the sons have followed in their father’s footsteps, several of the grandchildren may well do so. “He was one of the most humanitarian human beings I can remember,” says Gina Godfrey. “He had a great bedside manner and always made time for the patient … there should be more Bob Fillers in the world.”
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Calgary Flames open training camp after 4-month layoff
After four months to the day the NHL announced its pause on the 2019-20 season, the Calgary Flames returned to the ice for training camp Monday.
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Coronavirus: Australia tightens restrictions after new COVID-19 outbreaks
With growing fears of a second coronavirus wave nationally, two states extended border restrictions and Australia's most populous state imposed limits on the number of people allowed in large pubs.
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New molecule attacks COVID-19 on two fronts
A new molecule being developed by researchers at the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer of the Université de Montréal could slow the ability of the coronavirus to penetrate human cells and limit the damage the disease causes to the lungs.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
RCMP Major Crimes Unit investigates discovery of human remains near John D’Or Prairie, Alberta
One day after human remains were discovered in a forested area in northern Alberta, RCMP said Monday that "there are indications this death may be suspicious."
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Crown tries to attack credibility of ex Quebec TV star in sex assault trial
Salvail, who was in court Monday, is charged with sexual assault, harassment and unlawful confinement in connection with events alleged to have occurred between April and October 1993 against his former co-worker.
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Coronavirus: White House turns on Fauci as Trump attempts to minimize COVID-19 spike
With U.S. virus cases spiking and the death toll mounting, the White House is working to undercut its most trusted coronavirus expert, playing down the danger as U.S. President Donald Trump pushes to get the economy moving before he faces voters in November.
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COVID-19 cases linked to private hotel parties in Kelowna, B.C. health minister says
Eight positive tests for the disease are linked to visits to downtown Kelowna and the city’s waterfront between June 25 and July 9, said an email from Interior Health, the regional health authority.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
#ICYMI: Mandatory masks, changes at MMFA, more news
Catch up on today's stories.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
Fire tears through U.S. Navy ship for 2nd day as smoke wafts over San Diego
Flames tore through a warship for a second day Monday as a top Navy official revealed that a fire suppression system was inoperable when the blaze erupted while the ship was docked in San Diego.
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Bleak economic picture expected in B.C.’s first fiscal update since start of COVID-19 pandemic
British Columbia's Finance Minister is expected to paint a bleak picture of the economy on Tuesday, more than four months after the global COVID-19 pandemic started.
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British nursing home residents stand in for rock stars in brilliant album recreations
A project to lift the spirits of residents of a U.K. nursing home that recreated a series of classic album covers -- everyone from Elvis to Taylor Swift -- with elderly folks posing as the rock stars, has turned into a viral sensation.
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Musician sparks joy performing on Vancouver street corner
When you walk down a city’s streets, you never know what you may find. But if you keep your eyes and ears open, you just might stumble upon something – or someone – memorable.
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Alberta minister surveilled by rogue cops calls it ‘the stuff of police states’
Two Lethbridge police officers have been temporarily demoted for targeting the former NDP environment minister
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Lisa Marie Presley ‘heartbroken’ over death of son Benjamin Keough, Elvis Presley’s grandson, at 27
TMZ reports that Keough died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound Sunday in Calabasas, Calif.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Travel Manitoba targeting locals and some neighbours with latest ad campaign
The crux of the $2-million campaign will be a series of videos featuring actual Manitobans as they become ambassadors for the province's destinations and experiences.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Fatty liver disease a growing public health concern in Canada, study shows
Physicians have historically treated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as relatively benign because liver fat usually just sits there and doesn’t do much. But about three to five per cent of those with the disease go on to develop a more problematic condition.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Hong Kong to impose strict social distancing measures after spike in COVID-19 cases
The Chinese-ruled city recorded 52 new cases of coronavirus on Monday, including 41 that were locally transmitted, health authorities said.
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Calls for more action to fight Quebec’s fentanyl crisis during coronavirus pandemic
According to Quebec's public health institute, fentanyl was detected in 11 per cent of deaths caused by an opioid overdose between January 2019 and March 2020.
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3 men injured, 2 seriously, after shooting in Toronto’s north end
Emergency crews were called to a property off of Jane Street near Yorkwoods Gate, south of Finch Avenue West, just after 8:30 p.m. on Monday.
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Coop proposes to take over regional air routes in Quebec
A new cooperative announced on Monday it is entering the regional air transport business in Quebec, filling the hole left by Air Canada's recent announcement it would cut several regional routes.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
“Racist Radio Karen” gets the boot in New Hampshire
A radio host in New Hampshire was fired after going on a racist tirade. Dianna Ploss got the boot from WSMN 1590 for her tirade against a group of landscaping workers who were speaking Spanish. “Dianna Ploss is no longer associated or affiliated in any way with WSMN or Bartis-Russell Broadcasting, LLC,” read a statement, […]
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Toronto Sun
Three men injured in North York shooting, police say
One in serious condition, two others with minor injuries, after shooting at about 9 p.m. Monday on Jane Street, south of Finch Avenue West.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Mother from Maskwacis calls for change after son dies in police custody
Wyoma Cabry wants the justice system to make changes to protect the well-being of prisoners after her 19-year-old son got sick and died in custody.
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Ontario is entering Stage 3, U.S. states are locking down again: 4 charts that pinpoint where we are in COVID-19 battle
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Advocate calls for legislation to address Saskatchewan’s high Indigenous suicide rate
Tristen Durocher is walking more than 600 km to draw attention to the high rate of Indigenous suicide in Saskatchewan.
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White Buffalo Youth Lodge opens emergency shelter for teens, young adults amid pandemic
Teenagers and young adults experiencing homelessness in Saskatoon now have a place to stay, spurred on my the coronavirus pandemic.
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Northeast Calgary residents warned of fly-by-night contractors in wake of devastating hailstorm
City officials have 'serious concern' after finding 34 unlicensed contractors in hardest hit neighbourhoods
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Meet the woman teaching 400 Hockey Canada players and staff how to confront racism
Racism in hockey has been thrust into the spotlight again in recent months. Tina Varughese is now talking to players and staff about unconscious bias.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
New Zealand opposition leader steps down 2 months before general election
The statement Todd Muller released at 7:30 a.m. said he was stepping down ``effective immediately'' and reportedly shocked his fellow lawmakers.
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Survey asks Edmonton Eskimos’ shareholders, others if CFL team should change its name
The Edmonton Eskimos football club confirmed Monday that it is asking shareholders and "other key audiences" to complete a survey about the team's name and whether it should be changed.
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Toronto mayor glad the GTA is sitting out Stage 3 reopening
Delaying the GTA’s involvement in the province’s latest reopening plans will backstop progress already made in combating COVID-19, Toronto’s mayor says. Speaking Monday at the city’s thrice-weekly COVID-19 press briefing, John Tory agreed with the province’s decision to exclude the GTA from this Friday’s Stage 3 reopening, which — among other measures — would see […]
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Toronto Sun
B.C. personal injury law firms threaten to blackball occupational therapists over ICBC consultation
An email copied to every major personal-injury plaintiff firm in the province is calling for lawyers to blackball occupational therapists who work with ICBC over ongoing changes at the public insurer.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Proposed class-action lawsuit led by former constable alleges racism in RCMP
One of the first Indigenous women to join the RCMP in Manitoba is the lead plaintiff in a proposed class-action lawsuit that alleges systemic racism within the force.
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CTV News | Top Stories - Breaking News -...
Coronavirus infections in Canada surpass 108,100 as global case count tops 13 million
The number of novel coronavirus case surpassed 108,100 on Monday, as worldwide infections topped 13 million.
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Saskatchewan WSA says flooding possible with high levels at Anglin Lake
Anglin Lake was risen to a level of 515.58 m, above its natural spill point of 515.42 m due to high moisture levels and precipitation, according to Saskatchewan WSA.
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Global News | Latest & Current News -...
Search for Martin Carpentier 'complex,' retired RCMP officer says
The density of the forest, the possible criminal element and the vast area being searched are all factors contributing to the lengthy search.
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Montreal Latest News, Breaking Headlines...
As COVID surges in the U.S., some experts worry about plan to further open up Ontario
Dine-in restaurants, playgrounds, gyms and even movie theatres will be allowed to re-open in much of Ontario Friday — although not in the Greater Toronto Area — as the province moves into the recovery period of a staggered re-opening plan. The new guidelines will apply in 24 of Ontario’s 34 public health regions, including all of Northern Ontario, Ottawa, Kingston and most of cottage country. Excluded from the list, for now, are Toronto and most of its suburbs, as well as several areas home to large farms and greenhouses, including Windsor-Essex County and Niagara. The gradual reopening comes after weeks of low — and in some areas, no — growth in the number of new COVID-19 cases in the province. Twenty public health units had five or fewer new cases on Monday, according to Health Minister Christine Elliott. Twenty-one had no new cases at all. Overall the province saw 116 new cases Monday, an increase of 0.3% from the day before. Still, the move to re-open so many businesses, so quickly, has some experts concerned. Just two hours after Ontario announced its plan to re-open bars and restaurants for dine-in service, California’s governor ordered all dine-in restaurants, and all bars in his state to close immediately. That move came after California, often praised for its pandemic response, was hit with a surge of new COVID cases, many tied, as they have been in places as disparate as Pittsburgh, Seoul and Montreal, to the re-opening of establishments where people, especially young people, can get drunk together inside. “That is probably the one piece — especially the bars — that is questionable (about the re-opening,)” said Dr. Zain Chagla, an infectious disease specialist in Hamilton. The province has taken some steps to mitigate the possible danger. Indoor gatherings, including in restaurants and bars, will be limited to 50 people. Social distancing rules will still apply, and everyone being served must have a seat. Chris Selley: Premier Ford, open Canada's most populous province Most of Ontario to move to Stage 3 of reopening plan on Friday, but Toronto among regions remaining behind Nightclubs, meanwhile, are still banned, as are private karaoke rooms, dancing and buffets. But enforcing those rules, across all of Ontario, won’t be easy. “The problem is, this is probably going to be personally policed, on the honour rule,” Chagla said. Servers and bartenders will be asked to monitor drunk young people who may not always accept the wisdom of staying six feet apart. “That’s probably the only one where it’s a little bit dicey and that needs to be watched closely,” Chagla said. Asked about the logic of opening up bars for indoor service now, given what’s happened in the United States, Premier Doug Ford admitted it could be an issue. “You aren’t wrong,” he told media. “I see these numbers from Florida and they’re staggering: 15,000 people contacted COVID in a day, that is scary. But we’re being pretty vigilant. We aren’t rushing into anything. We’re opening up slowly, in stage three, and being very, very cautious about it. But you make a good point.” Raywat Deonandan, an epidemiologist at the University of Ottawa, said it’s only partially fair to compare the American example to Ontario. It is the same disease and American bars and restaurants aren’t that different from Canadian ones. “But it’s not fair to the extent that Americans rushed back to the bars and behaved a certain way, flagrantly denying the threat, and Canadians in large part are not denying the threat,” he said. “So epidemiologically, it’s fair to compare them because an exposure happened and we saw an outcome. Sociologically, it may not be fair because the exposure may not be exactly the same given the differences in human behavior.” Ford said Monday that about 90 per cent of Ontario businesses should be able to reopen in stage three. Among the activities and business that are still considered unsafe are amusement parks and water parks, overnight camps for children, saunas, steam rooms, bathhouses and oxygen bars, and sports that involve “prolonged or deliberate” contact. The health regions that won’t be moving to stage three Friday are: • Durham Region Health Department. • Haldimand-Norfolk Health Unit. • Halton Region Public Health. • Hamilton Public Health Services. • Lambton Public Health. • Niagara Region Public Health. • Peel Public Health. • Toronto Public Health. • Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. • York Region Public Health. As for the plan as whole, Chagra understands why some people are nervous. But “there’s going to be some point where we’re going to have to say, okay, it’s time to see what happens if we open up again and try to resume normal life,” he said. The plan seems reasonable, he said, and generally controlled. “And we have the testing capacity to see, if anything does happen, that people are able to get tested right away and kind of get a sense of what’s going on.”
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National Post | Canadian News, Financial...
Photo shoot honours overdose victims as Piikani Nation sees spike in substance-related deaths
Individuals and families gathered on the Piikani Nation, holding photographs of loved-ones lost to substance abuse.
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Etobicoke woman, 76, nabbed in airport drug bust
A 76-year-old Etobicoke woman has been arrested in connection with two significant cocaine seizures, worth an estimated $1.3 million, made last month at Toronto Pearson International Airport. The two drug busts, made by the Canada Border Services Agency and the RCMP, came less than a week apart and involved smuggling cocaine into the country from […]
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Toronto Sun