'The soul is everywhere': Saying a final goodbye during a pandemic

"I think COVID has taught us that you don’t have to be at the physical place where the person is being buried."
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2 COVID-19 cases linked to Guelph after-school program
The Ontario government has linked two confirmed COVID-19 cases to an after-school program in Guelph. 
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1 active case of COVID-19 remains in Nova Scotia as of Wednesday
The province said one person is currently hospitalized in ICU.
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Scary thought: Parents worried COVID-19 could cancel Halloween 2020
The meme was on Facebook, posted by a woman I went to elementary school with, who has children of her own now: “Halloween 2020 cannot be cancelled!” It had a bright-purple banner with a cartoon haunted house in the background, its galvanizing message overlaid in canary-yellow Comic Sans. The image mounts the argument that Halloween “is probably the only holiday that can adhere to most COVID-19 guidelines,” and that anyway, it’s “also on a Saturday, will have a full moon, and will be an extra hour long,” as the clock rolls back that night at 2 a.m. “The universe has never wanted us to celebrate a holiday more than this,” the meme cheerfully concludes. Now, you may suspect these are merely the livid fulminations of a fringe of moms, indignantly braying against lockdown precautions from the comfort of their smartphones or laptops. But then I saw a different meme about the same cause. This one included a righteous call to action: “Halloween is NOT run by the government! Turn your porch light on and pass out candy! If you can go into Walmart where it’s packed, we can have Halloween!” This one had a hashtag — #savehalloween2020. And this meme had been shared, across Facebook, 593,000 times. Clearly, people are passionate about saving Halloween. But does Halloween need saving? On Tuesday, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States updated its guidelines around how to safely trick or treat this year . Halloween and other holidays “will likely need to be different this fall to prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Avoid activities that are higher risk for spread. Consider fun alternatives that pose lower risk of spreading the virus that causes COVID-19,” the CDC says on its website. Among the low-risk alternatives recommended by the CDC are things like carving or decorating pumpkins with members of your household, having a Halloween movie night with people you live with, or a virtual Halloween costume contest. Moderate-risk activities the CDC cites are one-way trick-or-treating, where individually wrapped goodie bags are lined up outside for kids to grab, socially distanced. And, the CDC says, a costume mask is not a substitute for a cloth mask. “A costume mask should not be used unless it is made of two or more layers of breathable fabric that covers the mouth and nose and doesn’t leave gaps around the face.” In Canada, meanwhile, policies vary by region, and in some regions it’s still being worked out. Dr. Bonnie Henry confirmed last week that the children of British Columbia “can have Halloween this year,” suggesting that children minimize “rummaging around” for treats and that people handing out candy could “maybe do something at the end of the driveway.” Dr. Horacio Arruda, in Quebec, has assembled a “scientific committee” to determine the safety inherent in trick-or-treating, cautioning that everyone simply “walking around and visiting other people’s homes” seems ill-advised. Trick-or-treating has been banned in Woodstock, N.B., a motion passed unanimously by Woodstock’s city council. It is so far the only Canadian city to come out against the holiday with such definitive force. Elsewhere the prevailing attitude seems to be “wait and see.” The prospect of sending kids door-to-door in the middle of a global pandemic, of course, seems more or less precarious depending on the cases in the particular area. One of the cities in Canada most challenged by COVID-19 right now is Toronto — and understandably Toronto has been reluctant so far to give trick-or-treating the green light. Mayor John Tory, recently pressed to clarify the city’s position on the holiday, equivocated: “We don’t have the power to just order Halloween cancelled,” he said, “but I can tell you right now, if the medical officer of health’s advice to me is that I should say to parents, ‘You should not go out and you should not be handing out candy and all those kinds of things, because we think it poses a risk, especially with numbers going up,’ I wouldn’t hesitate for a second to do that.” Parents should be greatly reassured. But until the mayor actually speaks out against Halloween, it’s worth considering the risks. On the one hand, walking around the neighbourhood and banging on strangers’ doors seems a risk to public health, and indeed, is almost the exact opposite of what we’ve all been doing for six months in lockdown. On the other hand — and as the memes on Facebook have carefully laid out — there are a number of reasons why Halloween feels almost expressly designed for the COVID pandemic, and a case could be made that Halloween may be the only holiday we can safely celebrate. First, there is the matter of the mask: easily worked into most costumes. There is the element of distance: there tends to be little congregation, unless you live in a particularly popular neighbourhood with trick or treaters. Trick-or-treating is done outdoors, and while you interact with strangers, you don’t spend much time face-to-face with them. The treats are sealed and aren’t especially infectious. And most uniquely, Halloween is one of the only holidays that doesn’t involve spending time with elderly (and therefore vulnerable) relatives. You can see why many people have embraced this argument with such zeal — the case seems compelling, even to the acutely cautious. This perhaps accounts for the results of a new Abacus Data study of Canadian adults commissioned by the Retail Council of Canada: it found that eight out of 10 parents still do intend to celebrate Halloween. For some people, naturally, a sack of candy will not be worth the small degree of risk involved in the process. And it’s expected that whether trick-or-treating ultimately earns the government’s approval or not, many parents will elect to celebrate Halloween safely at home. For now, at least, it seems reasonably certain that Halloween 2020 will not be cancelled. The scarier question is whether or not it can be. You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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3 Waterloo Region daycares now under outbreak status
Inspiring Minds Early Learning Centre in Wellesley, FunCare Learning Centre in Elmira, and YWCA KW St. Paul Childcare in Kitchener join a growing provincial list.
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Canadiens, forward Jake Evans agree to two-year contract extension
Evans will earn US$700,000 in the NHL and US$225,000 in the AHL in 2020-21. He will receive US$800,000 for the second year in the NHL on one-way pact. 
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Laval police file complaint after restaurant's reported flouting of COVID-19 rules
The complaint comes after an on-site investigation and videos depicted more than 200 patrons of the Lordia restaurant ignoring social distancing and violating other regulations.
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Mississauga Indigo bookstore workers vote to unionize, a month after retailer reports losses
It says the next step will be negotiating a union contract with the company that addresses the concerns of the roughly 40 workers at the bookstore, including wages, job security and sick leave.
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Nova Scotia Lobster Dispute Shows Racism Rooted In Canadian Fishing Industry
As Hurricane Teddy approached Nova Scotia Tuesday morning, Mi’kmaq fishermen tied up their boats and hunkered down at their campsite, prepared to wait out the storm. The approaching Category 2 hurricane was a welcome distraction for Sipekne’katik First Nation after facing days of pushback from non-Indigenous, commercial fishermen against a new, self-regulated lobster fishery in Saulnierville, N.S, said Chief Michael Sack. “We’re getting ready for the storm to pass. I think we’re taking this time to regroup and go back at it,” Sack told HuffPost Canada.  What’s now known as the lobster dispute has played out on the waters of Nova Scotia this past week, with fishermen on both sides, as well as politicians, demanding the federal government intervene. The disagreement, however, isn’t just about lobsters, but also the treaty rights of Indigenous people who are striving to earn a living from hunting, gathering and fishing. “It’s fishing, but it’s much more than that for us,” Sack said. “It’s stepping up and making sure that other levels of government respect our people.”What’s been going on?Last week, Sipekne’katik Mi’kmaq launched its fishery at a federal wharf, distributing seven licences to Mi’kmaq fishing boats for a total of 350 traps — less than a single commercial fishing vessel puts out, Sack said. There are 979 inshore lobster licences issued for that region of Nova Scotia.  The fishery is one way the Sipekne’katik community is hoping to combat poverty, by creating more jobs that pay a living wage in the lucrative lobster industry, said Sack. Under their treaty rights, the Mi’kmaq are allowed to fish without restrictions in order to earn a “moderate livelihood,” based on a landmark 1999 Supreme Court ruling, he said.But the launch of the fishery sparked fierce opposition from non-Indigenous fishermen, who claim it’s illegal to harvest lobster during the current off-season, citing concerns about sustainability.After the ceremony, up to 50 non-Indigenous fishing boats encircled Mi’kmaq boats and reportedly shot emergency flares in their direction. “There needs to be a full crackdown on illegal fishing and the sale of illegally harvested fish immediately,” said Martin Mallet, executive director of the Maritime Fishermen’s Union in a statement that called for the federal government’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) to intervene.“More enforcement, bigger fines and more serious penalties need to be put on the table right now,” Mallet said, adding that fishermen were “peacefully” protesting the Indigenous lobster traps. The RCMP arrested two people at the wharf on assault charges following ugly confrontations on Friday, as non-Indigenous fishers continued to monitor the mouth of the harbour. On Sunday, the situation escalated as non-Indigenous fishermen on about 100 boats removed Mi’kmaq lobster traps off the western coast of the province.“They’re trying to disconnect the Natives from any resources,” said Sack of the non-Indigenous fishermen. “They’re putting pressure on people who sell fuel, bait, gear. They’re threatening to boycott them if they do any business with us.” New strategy from the commercial fishermen in south west Nova Scotia today: they’re turning their attention to those who they believe are buying Mi’kmaw-harvested lobster. Big crowd gathered outside the house of an alleged buyer this morning. pic.twitter.com/VbcG4naBv8— Taryn Grant (@tarynalgrant) September 21, 2020The Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw Chiefs described these actions as “harassment” and “racism” in a statement Monday. The assembly also enacted a state of emergency because of the “violence occurring over Mi’kmaq fisheries across the province.”  What’s the Supreme Court ruling about? Twenty-one years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that the Mi’kmaq had the right to fish “in pursuit of a moderate livelihood” where and when they want without a licence. The Marshall Decision was rooted in the 1760s Peace and Friendship Treaties and is protected by the Canadian Constitution. If the DFO wanted to regulate Mi’kmaq fishing, it would have to conduct meaningful consultations about any proposed limitations with the community, lawyer Bruce Wildsmith, a retired Dalhousie University law professor, told CBC Radio’s Jeff Douglas. “Consultation would be central to any regulation,” said Wildsmith, who has represented Mi’kmaq in treaty cases, including in the Marshall Decision. “That consultation has never taken place.” Both sides agree the federal government has dropped the ball by not defining what a “moderate livelihood” means or setting restrictions. “Fishermen care about the future sustainability of the fishery and they expect DFO to step up and enforce the rules across the board,” says O’Neil Cloutier, director of Regroupement des pêcheurs professionnels du sud de la Gaspésie, representing inshore fishermen in Quebec, in a statement signed by fishermen associations across eastern Canada. The Sipekne’katik First Nation said that after two decades of waiting for the DFO to recognize its treaty right to harvest and sell fish, and seeing little movement, it’s taking control. “We trust the lobster industry and DFO to respect our processes, which are intended to be of mutual benefit and to resolve and bring certainty to a long-standing constitutional breach,” it said in a statement.The Assembly of First Nations echoed these remarks. “The alarming escalation is a direct result of inaction by Minister Bernadette Jordan and (the DFO),” said National Chief Perry Bellegarde in a statement. “There must be no delay in ensuring and protecting the safety and security of First Nations fishers and their constitutional and treaty rights to fish.” What’s the federal government doing now?Jordan and Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Carolyn Bennett met with the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw Chiefs on Monday, and affirmed the Marshall Decision “that Mi’kmaw have a constitutionally protected treaty right to fish in pursuit of a moderate livelihood,” they said in a joint statement. “We share the concerns of the Assembly Chiefs for the safety of their people. There is no place for the threats, intimidation, or vandalism that we have witnessed in South West Nova Scotia. This is unacceptable.” The Canadian Coast Guard, RCMP and public safety officials are patrolling the sea, land and air to respond to any dangerous situations. “Reconciliation is a Canadian imperative and we all have a role to play in it,” the ministers’ statement said. “What is occurring does not advance this goal, nor does it support the implementation of First Nation treaty rights, or a productive and orderly fishery.” They said they are going to have future conversations with First Nations leaders about their treaty rights. Sack was skeptical the federal government would follow through on its promise, or help them stand up to non-Indigenous fishermen. “It was bagged,” the chief said. “Until they actually implement it, it’s kind of just lip service.”RELATED Teddy Pounds Nova Scotia With 100-Kilometre Winds And Heavy Rain Residential Schools In Canada Formally Recognized As Historic Sites RCMP Investigating After Hate Groups Crash Alberta Anti-Racism Rally
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‘We are close to red,’ Dr. Vera Etches says as Ottawa adds 65 new COVID-19 cases
Ottawa's top doctor says the city is teetering on the edge of the most severe level of the public health unit's COVID-19 warning system.
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Coronavirus: Latest developments in the Greater Toronto Area on Sept. 23
Here is a roundup of the latest developments on the coronavirus pandemic in the Greater Toronto Area for Wednesday.
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No plan to give police special power to enter homes, says deputy premier
The CAQ government was scrambling Wednesday to quash the suggestion it might give police more powers to enter private residences to shut down parties and enforce COVID-19 rules.
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Iran, where national security means confiscating a girl’s piano
Fifteen-year-old Nawal Talebi saw her parents imprisoned and her beloved musical instrument carted off as Tehran steps up its persecution of minorities The post Iran, where national security means confiscating a girl’s piano appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Rainfall warning in effect for Metro Vancouver as storm hits B.C.’s south coast
Rainfall amounts of 40 to 70 millimetres are forecast for Metro Vancouver by Thursday morning.
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Ontario reports another 30 per cent jump in active COVID-19 cases at schools, including 21 more students
In its latest data released Wednesday morning, the province reports that 153 schools has a current case, which it notes is 3.17 per cent of the 4,828 publicly funded schools.
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Epstein's ex Ghislaine Maxwell dined with Bill Clinton, others at 'secret' 2014 L.A. dinner: report
Former U.S. president Bill Clinton sat down with Ghislaine Maxwell at a secret dinner party in February 2014, long after she had been linked to the crimes of pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, according to a new report by the Daily Beast . Maxwell is the one-time girlfriend and longtime confidante of Epstein, who committed suicide in his Manhattan jail cell in August 2019 as he awaited trial on sex trafficking charges. She herself is currently jailed awaiting trial over her alleged links to his crimes. A spokesperson for Clinton declined to comment to the Daily Beast, instead referring the publication to a statement from last year, in which Clinton said he did not have any knowledge of Epstein’s crimes. Angel Urena, a Clinton spokesperson, told Forbes that Clinton isn’t accused of doing anything wrong. Maxwell was among 20 guests at the intimate dinner, held at the upscale Crossroads Kitchen vegan restaurant in the city, the Daily Beast report alleges. Also allegedly present were her boyfriend at the time, CargoMetrics CEO Scott Borgerson, and the late political donor Steve Bing. Clinton and Maxwell had not been in the same social group for three years prior to the dinner, the Daily Beast reports. She had apparently been cut out of the social circle in 2011, but was allegedly invited back into the circle at some later point. “Think of all the people (Clinton) knows in L.A., and Ghislaine gets to attend,” an anonymous source told the Daily Beast. A different anonymous source added that Clinton’s team had been relieved, in the end, that word of Maxwell’s attendance was not made public at the time of the dinner. The Daily Beast reported that Maxwell’s invitation had sparked argument within Clinton’s team, because by then she was already accused by at least one woman of involvement in a sex ring run by Epstein. Maxwell was arrested in July of this year for allegedly trafficking young girls and supplying them to the late financier. She is awaiting trial in Brooklyn, and was denied release on a suggested $5 million bond, over fears that she would flee the country. Clinton has long been linked via media reports to Epstein, but told Forbes in 2019 he knew nothing about the millionaire’s crimes, adding he had never been to Epstein’s private property in the Virgin Islands. However, court records from a defamation lawsuit between Maxwell and alleged Epstein victim Virginia Roberts Giuffre appear to indicate that Clinton flew to Epstein’s island on a helicopter, Forbes reports. Roberts Giuffre was featured heavily in the recent Netflix docu-series Jeffery Epstein: Filthy Rich,. In August, the Daily Mail released photos from 2002 of Clinton apparently appearing to get a neck massage from one of Epstein’s other alleged victims, Chauntae Davies.
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Canada hastened to forget its role in World War II. We remembered, but is it too late?
Those who go on John Goheen’s tours call it the “Middle of Nowhere Tour”. Goheen, a 54-year-old middle school principal from Port Coquitlam, B.C, acts as a guide and historian for the Royal Canadian Legion’s Pilgrimage of Remembrance in which he takes Canadian tourists across Europe to important sites for the First and Second World War. When he started doing the tours mainly across France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, Goheen says his group would mostly be comprised of Second World War veterans. But nowadays, it’s their children and grandchildren, trying to retrace their relatives’ footsteps. “I give them stories, I call them gateways,” Goheen said. “It’s really trying to offer an emotional gateway to the past.” When Goheen brings a group to an important Second World War landmark, he tries to get them to visualize the events that happened here about 75 years ago. But oftentimes, he ends up taking them to an unmarked field in the middle of the countryside, without a plaque or memorial to indicate what happened there. Hence, “The Middle of Nowhere Tour.” “If you didn’t know, you’re standing in the middle of a field or a hill and there’s nothing there. But it’s a hugely significant site and there’s nothing there that commemorates it,” Goheen said. “No plaque, no tablet, no cairn, anything. People 25 years from now will drive by and have no clue that anything happened there. And why would they?” COVID-19: Second World War commemorations become a casualty of the pandemic Following the 75th anniversary of the official end of WWII, a famous Canadian mistake comes to light September 2, 2020, marked the 75th anniversary of the official surrender of the Empire of Japan, as well as the official end of the Second World War. But for years, after almost a million veterans returned from the war, their stories were barely told and the Second World War quickly vanished from Canadians’ collective memory. It’s only in recent years that we’ve started to get it back. In his new book, The Fight for History: 75 years of forgetting, remembering, and remaking Canada’s Second World War , historian Tim Cook argues that the country as a whole quickly moved away from the war. Hundreds of thousands of veterans needed to be reintegrated into society, and the relatives and loved ones of more than 45,000 fallen soldiers needed to find a way to move on. The Veterans Charter, which provided returning soldiers with financial benefits and other incentives — such as the chance to attend a Canadian university for free — was crucial in providing the safety net they needed. “We were moving forward into the prosperous 20th century,” Cook, a member of the Royal Society of Canada and the Order of Canada, told the National Post. “We treated our veterans well, they reintegrated back into society, for the most part.” But though they were treated well, Cook argues that collectively and politically, Canada quickly moved away from the Second World War. The First World War was a traumatic experience for Canadians, Cook says, and when it ended, the country built thousands of monuments, locally and abroad, notably at Vimy Ridge in France and the National War Memorial in Ottawa. Canadians celebrated Armistice Day, later known as Remembrance Day, annually on November 11, and began wearing poppies. And while Second World War veterans accepted some of the symbols of their past generation, many wanted their own monuments erected. But the government of the time, led by Liberal William Lyon Mackenzie King, turned down their requests. The National War Memorial had only been completed in 1939, and a national survey of Canadians supported the idea of building “functional memorials” instead. Instead of the traditional stone monoliths built after the First World War, Canadians wanted to erect buildings such as libraries, community centres, and swimming pools, and dedicate them in honour of the veterans. They hoped that these memorials could become vibrant gathering places in communities, where fallen soldiers could be remembered the way they had been when alive. But in hindsight, Cook says, that often wasn’t the case. “Critics were saying they weren’t sacred spaces, they’re not places to gather and to bear witness, and to reflect upon service and sacrifice,” he said. “And they haven’t been that. Most of them have not survived over the 75 years. “The lack of memorials has diminished the place of the Second World War in memory.” At the same time, the British and the Americans were writing books, plays, and films to commemorate their contribution to the war, while Canadian stories were left behind. “It’s absolutely crucial to understand why we forgot the war. If you don’t tell your own story, it will be forgotten,” Cook said. The Vietnam War left a sour taste in the mouths of many Canadians and anti-war sentiments were everywhere. Canada began to develop a reputation as being peacekeepers in times of war. But, Cook says, peacekeeping became an easy way to view the country’s military history and started to obscure the country’s role in the wars of the past. Decades went by and slowly but surely the memory of the Second World War was vanishing from the minds of Canadians. But historians say there was a major turning point: the 50th anniversary of D-Day, where the allied forces landed in Normandy, France, and laid the groundwork for victory. In anticipation of the 50th anniversary in 1994, Canadian military historian Jack Granatstein was brought on by the CBC to help with their coverage, which he said was a “major effort.” Granatstein said that The National host Peter Mansbridge, whose father fought with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, wanted to overcome pushback that the network had been receiving since releasing The Valour and the Horror miniseries in 1992. The series accused the Canadian military during the Second World War of incompetence and alleged hidden war crimes. Accompanied with a swath of cameras and staff, Granatstein spent a few weeks in London and France to record and broadcast information about the Allied Forces’ invasion. Ultimately, the coverage greatly impacted Canadians , most of whom had connections to veterans still living at the time. “It had real impact, and I think it finally brought home to Canadians that their fathers had done great things in the world,” Granatstein told the National Post. “It wasn’t just the Americans and the Brits who’d won that war, it was Canadians too. I think that really mattered.” Canadians were interested in learning about the war again. Veterans were invited into classrooms to tell their stories, memoirs and historical books were published, and plays were being produced. The Juno Beach Centre was opened in Normandy and a new Canadian War Museum building was erected in Ottawa. People are starting to remember again, Cook says, but sadly, it comes at a time where there are fewer than 30,000 Second World War veterans still alive. When he stops to think about it, John Goheen feels like he carries a huge weight. The headline announcing the death of the last Canadian Second World War veteran is inevitably coming, but he thinks about what might happen when his generation, one of the last to have living memories of First and Second World War veterans, is gone as well. “I feel this burden sometimes,” he said. “They’re in my head, but how will these be preserved? And right now, they’re not going to be. That’s the sad part.”
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Photo radar in 12 ‘safety zones’ in Hamilton starts Oct. 1
The photo radar program in school zones, passed by city council in January, will start issuing tickets to offenders on Oct. 1, 2020.
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3 men charged in relation to the homicide of Terrance Thomas Dixon: Halifax police
The investigation into Dixon's murder is ongoing.
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COVID-19 saliva tests may soon be used more widely in Laval, health official says
The use of the saliva test has just been extended to assess COVID-19 outbreaks that take place outside of area hospitals.
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200,000 dead as Trump vilifies science, prioritizes politics
While there is no indication that Trump’s desperation for a vaccine has affected the science or safety of the process, his insistence that one would be ready before the election is stoking mistrust in the very breakthrough he hopes will help his reelection.
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Bianca Andreescu takes 2020 season off, plans to focus on health
The 20-year-old Canadian announced her decision to remain sidelined this season via a post Tuesday on social media.
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PM’s Chief Of Staff Won’t Be Investigated For Conflict Of Interest Claims
OTTAWA — The federal ethics watchdog has dismissed Conservative allegations of conflict of interest involving Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s chief of staff and her husband.Ethics commissioner Mario Dion says the allegations are “speculative” and do not provide “a factual basis to support the belief that a contravention” of the Conflict of Interest Act may have occurred.Consequently, Dion says he’s informed Conservative MPs Pierre Poilievre and Michael Barrett that their request for an investigation does not meet the requirements of the act.His conclusion was relayed in a Sept. 15 letter, obtained by The Canadian Press, to Trudeau’s chief of staff, Katie Telford.The Conservatives’ allegations revolved around a report that Telford’s husband, Rob Silver, had lobbied aides in the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) and the finance minister’s office to change the rules for the federal emergency wage subsidy program so that mortgage finance company MCAP would be eligible.Silver is a senior vice-president with MCAP, a post he has held since January.Watch: Trudeau isn’t ruling out an election during the pandemic. Story continues below. Telford has set up an ethics screen to prevent her involvement in any decision related to MCAP, even though Dion’s office had advised her it wasn’t necessary. But in their letter to Dion requesting an investigation, Poilievre and Barrett alleged an elaborate scheme to benefit Silver and, by extension, Telford.They included a graphic of a so-called “silver triangle,” detailing what they referred to as a “trinity of interests” between Telford, Silver and Mike McNair, a former policy adviser in the PMO who had returned in a voluntary capacity to help out during the COVID-19 pandemic.McNair is now back full-time at the PMO.The Conservative MPs alleged that Silver contacted McNair about the wage subsidy program changes he wanted and that McNair told him to speak to aides in then-finance minister Bill Morneau’s office, with whom Silver had already been in contact.They alleged that McNair hoped to regain full-time employment at the PMO by helping Telford’s husband, “recognizing that reports of his co-operation and helpfulness could pass from Mr. Silver to Ms. Telford,”  who would decide whether to re-hire McNair.“Ms. Telford actually appears to have placed Mr. McNair in an impossible situation: see that Mr. Silver’s interests were looked after or jeopardize his own chances of being re-employed,” the MPs alleged.READ MORE ‘This Is A Coverup’: Tories Blast Trudeau’s Prorogation Amid WE Scandal Tories Accuse Liberals Of Ethical Breach With Rent-Relief Program Trudeau Doesn't Seem To Know 'Basic' Conflict Of Interest Rules: Expert MPs argued that it is “stunning” to suggest that Telford was unaware that her husband was “burning up the phone lines, pressing her subordinates” about the wage subsidy program.  They therefore concluded that she failed to recuse herself both from the issue and from the decision to re-hire McNair, in contravention of the Conflict of Interest Act.In the end, the eligibility rules for the wage subsidy program were not changed but Poilievre and Barrett suggested that may have been a “bait and switch” gambit. They suggested that MCAP was rewarded instead by receiving an $84-million contract from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. to administer the emergency commercial rent relief program and questioned what role McNair may have played in that decision.The Crown corporation has said it made that decision independently.While the ethics commissioner has dismissed the matter, the office of federal lobbying commissioner Nancy Belanger has said it is conducting a “preliminary assessment” of Silver’s efforts to change the wage subsidy eligibility rules.Silver is not currently registered as a lobbyist.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 23, 2020.
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Teen killed in horseback riding accident near Hamilton was ‘an absolute joy to teach’
A 14-year-old who died in a riding accident in Flamborough is being remembered as an 'experienced horse person' with passion.
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These Sex Toys Getting Are Getting Canadians Through The Pandemic
Let’s cut to the chase: Many of us are horny right now. The COVID-19 pandemic has made getting some challenging, as most Canadians staying at home are either abstaining from partnered sex or reducing their number of intimate partners.It’s no surprise then that masturbation continues to be a regular pandemic past-time, long after quarantine baking and gardening have lost their fad appeal. You might even call solo play a collective responsibility, as authorities like B.C.’s public health agency endorses the ménage à moi to minimize potential viral exposure.Helping people fulfill their intimacy cravings solo is the booming sex toy business, with the industry reporting worldwide spikes in sales as the pandemic continues. And with a second wave on the horizon, those cravings during the colder months are likely to persist or possibly deepen due to fewer outdoor spaces to convene. To find out how Canadians are using sex toys and intimacy aids to get through the worst of times, HuffPost Canada asked Twitter, along with two sex toy experts for their pandemic recommendations. Story continues after the slideshow. All product choices are made independently by our editors. HuffPost Canada may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page.From the toys recommended by Erin Sue, Pink Cherry’s sales director, and Jack Lamon, worker-owner of Come As You Are, some common features emerged, as many provide comfort in ways that mimic partnered sex (through suction, thrusting, or “come hither” motions), or fulfilled a need for human affection:    Rising sales point to more time for explorationSue noted that Pink Cherry’s sales have doubled. Come As You Are’s expertise is also more popular than ever, with a storefront expected to open in Toronto’s Kensington Market neighbourhood later this year.Both said that many sales came from first-time customers, with Lamon noting Come As You Are’s reputation as a trans- and queer-owned co-operative making it an accessible location for those exploring their sexual needs.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Come As You Are Co-operative (@comeasyouareco) on Sep 18, 2020 at 3:27am PDTI think that we’re seeing this trend in different aspects of people’s lives, not just in sexuality,” Lamon said. “For folks who do have more time at home and maybe don’t have access to partners or dates, they’re taking all that energy that they usually put out in the world and spending more time really getting back to basics of ourselves and making ourselves right with the world.”Sexually speaking, that may look like exploring what G-spot or prostate stimulation feels like; improving pelvic health and increasing insertion comfort with dilator use; or reading up on pleasure and boundaries.  He also connected this need for self-love in a pandemic with pleasure activism, adding that for folks fighting for Indigenous and Black causes, “being right with ourselves” helps people work in their movements sustainably by alleviating stress. Multipurpose toys FTWToys don’t have to provide only sexual stimulation in one way, Sue noted, as many of Pink Cherry’s bestsellers are wand massagers, like the legendary Hitachi wand, which can be enjoyed by many genders for its hardcore externally-stimulating vibrations. “They’re great for overall wellness and back massages that are not necessarily sexual-related,” Sue explained. Canadians are suckers for suction toysBoth Sue and many who answered an informal Twitter callout sung the praises of suction toys, which use air waves to create satisfying vacuums that can mimic oral sex. Famed for causing intense orgasms, suction toys make up much of Pink Cherry’s list of bestsellers.Suction toys have also received rave reviews for simulating human touch in other ways, by applying them to nipples and other sensitive body parts.  View this post on InstagramA post shared by Unbound (@unboundbabes) on Sep 21, 2020 at 3:52pm PDT“It’s really at the forefront for clitoris owners right now,” Sue said, which many reviewers of popular brands like Unbound’s Puff and the unfortunately named Womanizer can attest to. Household items can help too (within reason)Weighted blankets and hugging pillows are great for anxiety, while also making for excellent intimacy aids for those looking to simulate the weight and size of a body; weighted blankets can feel like someone’s embrace, while hugging pillows can assist big-time canoodlers. longing for human comfort so much i got a weighted blanket— andi c. ✨ average tiddy white-passing gf (@airismile) September 19, 2020On the other hand, some everyday essentials like electric toothbrushes, which are notoriously known as makeshift vibrators, might not be a good idea, as mouth bacteria is probably not good to have close to one’s genitals in the long-term, Lamon said.Come As You Are is a great fan of using fresh produce in the bedroom. “If you get an organic cucumber and you peel it, it’s a super fun toy to play with for penetration,” he said. “And if you’re someone who has a penis, grab that melon baller, scoop into a cantaloupe, and go at it for a super fun time.”Tips for first-time shoppersVolume: Many toys bring the good vibrations, but some may be more audible than you, your roommate, or your family members would appreciate. If you’re in the market for a new bedside companion, it’s a good idea to look for reviews on noise levels and water durability, should showers be where you feel most relaxed. Shipping: Trying to hide your purchase from prying eyes? While many stores ship in discreet packages, it’s worth double-checking on the store’s website how exactly you’ll be receiving your toy. Make your dollar matter: Supporting local businesses is easy thanks to online stores. In Ontario alone, shoppers can pick up glass toys from Peace Lily Toys, leather harnesses from Unicorn Collaborators, and transmasculine products from FTM PitStop. It’s also easy to buy from Black-owned product lines that have partnered with Canadian distributors, such as New York Toy Collective.  Prioritize fun: Sue’s biggest tip for any sex toy newbie?“Remember that whatever you want, or what interests you is the right decision for you,” she said.  And always remember to use lube. You’ll thank yourself later!MORE ON INTIMACY 11 Ways To Turn Yourself On So, Your Family Is Quarantined And Your Kid Just Discovered Masturbation Canadians, Here’s What You Can Learn About Sexual Health From Sex Workers Also on HuffPost:
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