City of Calgary finishes complicated Crowchild Trail work
'What a great day,' Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi said Tuesday. 'It's finally done, and I really want to thank Calgarians for their patience through this project.'
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Police investigate fatal 1-vehicle crash in Adjala-Tosorontio, Ont.
The driver, who was the only occupant in the vehicle, died as a result of their injuries.
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Canadians can now see conflicts of interest declared by COVID-19 vaccine task force
The move to publicly disclose the information comes after reporting by Global News.
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Wendy Mesley a host without a show after CBC’s The Weekly taken off air
CBC’s The Weekly with Wendy Mesley will not return this fall. “With respect to what Wendy will do next at CBC, we’re just discussing that with her now,” CBC’s head of public affairs Chuck Thompson said in a phone interview. Thompson said the decision is unrelated to Mesley’s use controversial language in June. “We had a look at the schedule and the decision was made that The Weekly would not be coming back in the fall.” Mesley used the N-word during an editorial meeting in 2019 while preparing for a segment. Mesley said in an apology on Twitter the word was not used as a slur, but in an attempt to share outrage with anti-Black racism. “I thought by saying the word, I was somehow exposing the truth,” Mesley said on Twitter in June. “I now realize that my abuse of the word was harmful. I hurt my colleagues, my team, and the CBC.” In the apology, Mesley acknowledged she had used the N-word a second time. During a 2019 meeting in Quebec, Mesley mentioned a French book with the English title White [N-words] of North America by Pierre Vallières as its full name. The book argues white francophones are also victims of discrimination. Mesley said she was using the word while quoting a journalist who was being considered for a panel on The Weekly. “Shortly after, my colleague told me that using that word had made people deeply uncomfortable,” Mesley said. “I wish I’d treated that more seriously.” Imani Walker, a Black CBC associate producer, heard Mesley use the word over the phone during the meeting, Walker said in a tweet one day after the apology. “White journalists who think it’s okay to say “n*****” (in any context) speak with an undeniable amount of privilege & power that Black, Indigenous & POC journalists will never have,” Walker said. “Saying “n-word” is sufficient – it’s a term BIPOC journalists use, no matter the context.” Walker added Mesley was only disciplined on June 9 after an internal investigation because there was a Black person on the call, but it is not the first time a white journalist at CBC has used the word. The Weekly covered topics such as finance, the #MeToo movement, trade deals and COVID-19 during the months leading up to the controversy. The Weekly first aired in January 2018 after Mesley established herself as a host on CBC’s consumer advocacy program Marketplace. Mesley later worked as a back-up host for the network’s premier nightly newscast, The National, formerly hosted by her ex-husband Peter Mansbridge. The two were married from 1989 to 1992. Mesley then became the regular Sunday host for the program before taking on The Weekly. In January 2005, Mesley revealed she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She returned to CBC in March 2006, the same time that her documentary Chasing the Cancer Answer was released. You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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Experts question whether Quebecers are prepared to endure second wave
The government must consider its ineffective contract tracing, mixed messages and public shaming, experts say.
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Canada-wide warrant issued for man who breached parole in Ottawa
Ottawa police describe Kenneth James Peever as being five-foot-eleven, weighing 171 lbs., with a shaved head and hazel eyes. He has tattoos on his upper right arm and torso and a scorpion tattoo on his neck.
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Okanagan police appeal to conscious of wheelchair thief
The wheelchair and camera were taken from the owner's vehicle while he was fishing.
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Ricin letter to Trump: What we know about the investigation so far
The letter contained a 'white, powdery material,' according to an FBI affidavit, and referred to the president as 'The Ugly Tyrant Clown.'
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COVID cancels Christmas: Toronto forced to go without much-loved seasonal market
COVID has cancelled work, classes, and festivals all over Toronto – and now it’s cancelled Christmas. Well, not exactly. But Mayor John Tory announced yesterday that the Toronto Christmas market won’t take place this year in the wake of the increasing number of coronavirus infections across the city. Tory told reporters that the cancellation was disappointing, but necessary. “It is one of a number of events at that time of the year that is unfortunately not going to be held,” Tory said. “It’s regrettable, extremely regrettable, because these are things that bring people joy and get them outside even in the colder weather, but a lot of things have changed this year.” The beloved annual tradition has drawn locals and tourists alike to the city’s historic Distillery District with its iconic 50-foot Christmas tree, seasonal treats like mulled cider and marzipan-filled cookies, and performances from local artists. This year would have marked the 11th year of the festival, which organizers say pulls in about 700,000 revellers each year over its six-week run. Organizers note that the restaurants, galleries, and stores in the Distillery District will remain open. “Guests will enjoy starry light canopies, a grand Christmas Tree in Trinity Square and festive music as part of a charming ‘Winter Village’ experience, which will extend from early November until the end of March,” organizers said in statement. “Throughout, we remain committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment in compliance with provincial health regulations.” The Christmas Market now joins the ranks of the Caribbean Carnival (formerly known as Caribana), Nuit Blanche , Pride , and the CNE as yet another iconic Toronto event cancelled for safety reasons.  
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BC Election: Merrifield, Veintimilla announced as BC Liberal candidates in Southern Interior
In announcing 19 candidates on Tuesday, the BC Liberals are calling the election unnecessary and irresponsible because of the coronavirus pandemic.
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Why the Raptors should weigh Norm Powell trade offers and wait to extend OG Anunoby. It’s strictly business
Anunoby is fast becoming the Raptors’ best defensive player, but an extension now will limit their options in next year’s game-changing free-agent market. And while Powell has become the player the Raptors were hoping for, his team-friendly contract might be the club’s most tradeable asset.
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1 new case of COVID-19 in Kingston region, active cases remain at 6
KFL&A Public Health has identified a new case of COVID-19 in the Kingston region.
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Canada’s Felix Auger-Aliassime advances to second round in Hamburg
Auger-Aliassime will next face Kazakhstan’s Alexander Bublik, who defeated Spain’s Albert Ramos-Vinolas 6-2, 7-6 (5) on Tuesday.
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Montreal police ask for public's help locating missing teen
Amanda Bédard, who is 5'6" and has brown hair and brown eyes, was last seen in Pierrefonds on July 25. She speaks French and English.
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‘Mini-moon’ set to join Earth might be a rock — or something more
Some astronomers suspect the potential 'mini-moon' was built on Earth many years ago.
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First photo: Quebec woman charged with threatening to kill U.S. President Donald Trump
A Quebec woman arrested at the U.S. border Sunday is charged with threatening to kill U.S. President Donald Trump after a letter calling him an “Ugly Tyrant Clown” and containing toxic ricin was mailed to the White House. Pascale Cecile Veronique Ferrier made explicit threats in the letter hoping the poison kills Trump, according to a criminal complaint filed in court outlining the investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. On Sept. 18, the U.S. Secret Service altered the FBI’s Washington, DC, field office that a letter addressed to “Donald J. Trump, The White House,” postmarked from Canada and arriving by mail arrived at the White House mail sorting facility, court documents say. It contained a white powdery material. The letter inside said, in part: “I found a new name for you: ‘The Ugly Tyrant Clown’ I hope you like it. You ruin USA and lead them to disaster. I have US cousins, then I don’t want the next 4 years with you as president. Give up and remove your application for this election,” according to the document. “So I made a ‘Special Gift’ for you to make a decision. This gift is in this letter. If it doesn’t work, I’ll find better recipe for another poison, or I might use my gun when I’ll be able to come. “Enjoy! FREE REBEL SPIRIT.” The FBI tested the powder and confirmed it was toxic ricin. The FBI said agents learned of six additional letters that appeared similar from other FBI field offices in Texas. These letters were received on Sept. 15 to 16 and also had been postmarked in Canada and also contained a powdery substance. The criminal complaint and sworn affidavit were filed in court ahead of Tuesday afternoon’s scheduled court appearance by Ferrier. It was prepared and signed by Special Agent Jonathan Preston, a bomb technician with the Federal Bureau of Investigation and filed in Washington, DC. “There is probable cause to believe that the defendant knowingly and willfully threatened to take the life of, and to inflict bodily harm upon, the President of the United States,” Preston’s sworn affidavit says. Preston is with an FBI squad that responds to weapons of mass destruction and explosive precursor and bombing incidents. She is scheduled to appear in Buffalo Federal Court Tuesday at 4 p.m.
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Ottawa wants more electric vehicle manufacturing in Canada. What will it take?
Done right, Canada can overcome its car conundrum while achieving a trifecta of outcomes: cutting transportation pollution, giving Canadians better access to the cars they want, and retooling our auto sector to compete in the 21st century.
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Hextall on Hockey: ‘That Connor kid’ takes home a Vezina
For the first time in Winnipeg Jets history, the team has a Vezina Trophy winner in Connor Hellebuyck. But the Jets goalie wasn’t always a household name.
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Opinion: A reprieve for English school boards, but battle continues
Let’s save time, money and grief. We invite the government to sit down with our community to find a way forward that respects our rights.
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10/3 podcast: What a universal basic income could look like in Canada
Since the COVID-19 pandemic shut down many sectors in our economy, the federal government has been doling out cash to Canadians. The CERB, or Canadian Emergency Response Benefit, was meant to help people through a very unexpected bumpy ride. But the CERB has sparked renewed discussions about a universal basic income in Canada. Dave Breakenridge is joined by national post political reporter Stuart Thomson about what a basic income would look like, who is pushing this idea, and what some of the potential pitfalls are.
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First storm of the fall set to move across B.C. starting Tuesday night
A special weather statement has been issued by Environment Canada due to periods of heavy rain and strong winds expected.
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Woman found dead in downtown apartment is Hamilton’s 11th homicide
A 39-year-old man found injured outside near the homicide scene is charged with second-degree murder.
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RCMP investigating incidents in relation to Mi’kmaq fishery dispute
Around 350 traps set by Indigenous fishermen were pulled from the water by non-Indigenous fishermen over the weekend.
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Coronavirus: More than 20,000 mail-in ballots already requested for B.C. election
Elections BC CEO Anton Boegman provided more details on how the public will be voting under the pandemic on Oct. 24.
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Belmont winner Tiz the Law won't run in Preakness
The Preakness on Oct. 3 at Pimlico concludes this year’s reconfigured Triple Crown series, which was run out of order because of the coronavirus pandemic.
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How a 6-3 conservative majority on the U.S. Supreme Court would differ from 5-4
If the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is replaced this year, the Supreme Court will become something the country has not seen since the justices became a dominant force in American cultural life after World War II: a decidedly conservative court. A court with a 6-3 conservative majority would be a dramatic shift from the court of recent years, which was more closely divided, with Ginsburg as the leader of the liberal wing of four justices and Chief Justice John Roberts as the frequent swing vote. As a scholar of the court and the politics of belief , I see three things likely to change in an era of a conservative majority: The court will accept a broader range of controversial cases for consideration; the court’s interpretation of constitutional rights will shift; and the future of rights in the era of a conservative court may be in the hands of local democracy rather than the Supreme Court. A broader docket The court only takes cases the justices choose to hear. Five votes on the nine-member court make a majority, but four is the number required to take a case . If Roberts does not want to accept a controversial case, it now requires all four of the conservatives – Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas – to accept the case and risk the outcome. If they are uncertain how Roberts will rule – as many people are – then the conservatives may not be willing to grant a hearing. With six conservatives on the court, that would change. More certain of the outcome, the court would likely take up a broader range of divisive cases. These include many gun regulations that have been challenged as a violation of the Second Amendment, and the brewing conflicts between gay rights and religious rights that the court has so far sidestepped . They also include new abortion regulations that states will implement in anticipation of legal challenges and a favorable hearing at the court. The three liberal justices would no longer be able to insist that a case be heard without participation from at least one of the six conservatives, effectively limiting many controversies from consideration at the high court. A rights reformation The rise of a 6-3 conservative court would also mean the end of the expansion of rights the court has overseen during the past half-century. Conservatives believe constitutional rights such as freedom of religion and speech, bearing arms, and limits on police searches are immutable. But they question the expansive claims of rights that have emerged over time, such as privacy rights and reproductive liberty. These also include LGBTQ rights , voting rights , health care rights , and any other rights not specifically protected in the text of the Constitution. The court has grounded several expanded rights, especially the right to privacy, in the 14th Amendment’s due process clause : “…nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.” This sounds like a matter of procedure: The government has to apply the same laws to everyone without arbitrary actions. From the conservative perspective, courts have expanded the meaning of “due process” and “liberty” far beyond their legitimate borders , taking decision-making away from democratic majorities. Consequently, LGBTQ rights will not expand further. The line of decisions that made Justice Anthony Kennedy famous for his support of gay rights, culminating in marriage equality in 2015 , will advance no further. Cases that seek to outlaw capital punishment under the Eighth Amendment’s ban on “ cruel and unusual punishments ” will also cease to be successful. In 2019 the court ruled that excessive pain caused by a rare medical condition was not grounds for halting a death sentence. That execution went forward, and further claims against the constitutionality of the death penalty will not. Challenges to voting restrictions will likely also fail. This was previewed in the 5-4 decision in 2018 allowing Ohio to purge voting rolls of infrequent voters. The Bill of Rights does not protect voting as a clear right , leaving voting regulations to state legislatures. The conservative court will likely allow a broader range of restrictive election regulations, including barring felons from voting . It may also limit the census enumeration to citizens, effectively reducing the congressional power of states that have large noncitizen immigrant populations . Birthright citizenship , which many believe is protected by the 14th Amendment, will likely not be formally recognized by the court. The court has never ruled that anyone born on U.S. soil is automatically a citizen . The closest it came was an 1898 ruling recognizing the citizenship of children of legal residents , but the court has been silent on the divisive question of children born of unauthorized residents. The conservative understanding of the 14th Amendment is that it had no intention of granting birthright citizenship to those who are in the country without legal authorization . Non-citizens may also find themselves with fewer rights: Many conservatives argue that the 14th Amendment requires state governments to abide by the Bill of Rights only when dealing with U.S. citizens . In any case, individual rights will likely be less important than the government’s efforts to protect national security – whether fighting terrorism, conducting surveillance or dealing with emergencies. Conservatives argue that the public need for security often trumps private claims of rights. This was previewed in Trump v. Hawaii in 2018, when the court upheld the travel ban imposed against several Muslim countries. Not all rights will be restricted. Those protected by the original Bill of Rights will gain greater protections under a conservative court. Most notably this includes gun rights under the Second Amendment, and religious rights under the First Amendment . Until recently, the court had viewed religious rights primarily through the establishment clause ’s limits on government endorsement of religion. But in the past decade, that has shifted in favor of the free exercise clause ’s ban on interference with the practice of religion. The court has upheld claims to religious rights in education and religious exceptions to anti-discrimination laws . That trend will continue. A return to local democracy Perhaps the most important ramification of a 6-3 conservative court is that it will return many policies to local control. For example, overturning Roe v. Wade – which is likely but not certain under a 6-3 court – would leave the legality of abortion up to each state. This will make state-level elected officials the guardians of individual liberties, shifting power from courts to elections. How citizens and their elected officials respond to this new emphasis is perhaps the most important thing that will determine the influence of a conservative court. Morgan Marietta , Associate Professor of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Lowell This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article . You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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Teens charged after man lured through online dating app assaulted, robbed at gunpoint: London police
The incident happened around 12:30 a.m. Friday in an unspecified parking lot along Commissioners Road East.
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Montreal police seek help identifying man who may have been abducted
Montreal police have turned to the public in an effort to identify a man who may have been the victim of an abduction. Police say the man was seen apparently being forced into a car Sunday afternoon at a Shell service station at 9080 Maurice-Duplessis Blvd. in the Rivière-des-Prairies sector. The incident occurred around 3:30 […]
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First full day of B.C.’s election campaign begins amid COVID-19 pandemic
John Horgan made the snap election call on Monday, conceding that he struggled with whether it's the right time for a campaign because of the pandemic.
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Winnipeggers asked to weigh in on city’s road safety action plan
The city says the Road Safety Strategic Action Plan will aim to help prevent serious injuries and death on Winnipeg roadways.
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Ontario’s cottagers facing hydro rate hike: Cottagers’ Association
The Federation of Ontario Cottagers' Association estimates 84,000 seasonal hydro customers will see cost increases of up to $1,000/year.
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Bianca Andreescu out for rest of tennis season to focus on health and training
Andreescu hasn’t played a competitive match since suffering a knee injury last October at the WTA Finals in China.
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School music classes were hit hard by the pandemic. This Hamilton teacher found a solution
Despite the pandemic, Wendy Young decided to go ahead and have a virtual end-term concert for her students at Orchard Park Secondary School.
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Alberta child care programs to receive funding boost as part of federal government’s Safe Restart Agreement
Licensed and approved child care programs in Alberta will receive a funding boost to the tune of $87 million to help cover increased costs due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Calgary man recounts slow recovery from COVID-19, worries about long-term health impacts
Matt Greenshields says it was a long process before he felt he was finally over the symptoms of COVID-19. He was diagnosed with the coronavirus in mid-March.
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