U.S. Supreme Court votes to not halt construction of Trump’s border wall

The Supreme Court declined by a 5-4 vote Friday to halt the Trump administration's construction of portions of the border wall with Mexico.
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The grisly murder of B.C.-born Playboy Playmate Dorothy Stratten still resonates 40 years later
Four decades later, Dorothy Stratten's death continues to live in the public imagination.
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City of London recognizes first responders on anniversary of Woodman Avenue explosion
On the first anniversary of the Old East Village explosion, the city of London honoured the first responders and other key community members who responded.
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Woman taking SUV for test drive crashes into Peterborough dealership, vehicles in lot
Around 3:20 p.m., emergency crews were called to Trent Valley Honda on Highway 7 east for reports of a crash in the dealership lot.
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Inside Facebook, hate-speech rules collide with Indian politics
Facebook faces a monumental challenge policing hate speech across the enormous volume of content posted to its platforms world-wide. The way it has applied its hate-speech rules to prominent Hindu nationalists in India, though, suggests that political considerations also enter into the calculus.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Police chiefs tell MPs they support health-focused response to mental health calls
Waterloo's police chief says law enforcement agencies are criminalizing homelessness, addiction and other issues that should be dealt with through a model focused on public health.
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Njoo positive about talks with CFL but cannot provide timeline for decision
Approval from the Public Health Agency of Canada is the biggest consideration in the CFL's request last week for a $30-million, interest-free loan from Ottawa.
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Connor McDavid still digesting Edmonton Oilers playoff loss
Fans of the Edmonton Oilers have spent the last week searching for answers on the team's early exit from the NHL playoffs. But captain Connor McDavid said he's still processing the loss.
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N.B. Liberals reject Tory election deal
New Brunswick's Opposition Liberals have rejected a proposal from Tory Premier Blaine Higgs for an agreement aimed at avoiding an election until 2022.
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Coronavirus: New resolved cases in Haliburton County; no new cases for HKPR health unit
The Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit reported no new cases of the novel coronavirus on Friday.
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Don’t like what you aee on Zoom? Get a facelift and join the crowd
At a time when many medical fields are reeling from lockdowns when lucrative electives work was postponed, cosmetic surgery procedures are surging, practitioners say, driven by unexpected demand from patients who have found the coronavirus pandemic a perfect moment for corporeal upgrades.
thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
16-year-old charged with second-degree murder by Peel police
The Youth Criminal Justice Acts prevents police from releasing the name of the accused
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Canada and China: It’s complicated
Joanna Chiu, who covers China-Canada relations for the Star, joins This Matters to discuss the state of relations between the two nations, and the issues that are causing friction between them.
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Fergus, Ont. woman charged in opioid overdose investigation
Wellington County OPP say a 32-year-old woman has been charged in connection with an investigation into multiple opioid overdoses.
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6 more positive tests for coronavirus reported in Waterloo, active cases now up to 35
Waterloo Public Health says six more people have tested positive for the coronavirus in the region, bringing the total number of cases to 1,417.
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Vinay Menon: Tom Cruise won’t run with other actors onscreen and we deserve to know why
Why does he want to run by himself? Is it because this is a big screen illusion? I mean, it looks like he’s moving at breakneck speed. But maybe he’d get passed by a toddler on a tricycle in the background, writes Vinay Menon.
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16-year-old charged with 2nd-degree murder after man found on Brampton pathway
Peel Regional Police said the 22-year-old victim was found "bloody and unconscious" on a recreational park trail near Queen Mary Drive, west of McLaughlin Road and south of Sandalwood Parkway West.
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Burnout Is A Hidden COVID-19 Crisis, And You Might Have It
Nearly six months ago, when the pandemic forced us all indoors, with no clear end in sight, I was overcome by absolute dread and then, mysteriously, a tempting sense of optimism. An image of the days to come materialized in my brain, resplendent with all that excess free time, and I allowed my ambitions to run wild. Thankfully, I still had my job, so I entertained my fantasies. Some things I imagined I might do over the course of the weeks in isolation: learn to cook elaborate meals; become a more devoted cinephile; write a short story; pick up the basics of a new language; Zoom happy hours and parties with friends; read, like, 30 books; relax; achieve my ideal body by the grace of some workout assistant app; be so productive I would, inevitably, surprise myself. What surprised me most were my many failures to launch.As it turned out, I didn’t feel so productive. Oftentimes, I didn’t even feel like myself. Whatever sense of optimism I’d initially cobbled together was misplaced somewhere along the way, then traded for a horrible, creeping anxiety. I couldn’t focus. Reading became impossible. I had headaches, and trouble sleeping. I felt incredibly nervous for my mother, an essential worker. My grandmother, already wearied by other health concerns, was hospitalized with COVID-19, and I became terrified of getting anyone sick.I felt this way for months. It didn’t occur to me that these things might all be connected until, about a week ago, a very astute colleague said, very plainly, “It’s called burnout,” then, “It’s hard to recognize that sometimes. But it’s good to name what’s happening.”Watch: Exercising less, but still feeling tired? Here’s why. Story continues below.COVID-19 is making Canadians anxious and “literally depressed”My colleague was right, on both counts. “The pandemic is a recipe for depression and anxiety,” Dr. Ingrid Söchting, director of the University of British Columbia Psychology Clinic, told HuffPost Canada. “What we’re seeing is many of our common protective buffers against stress — like social interactions and human connection — have suddenly been removed, and people are surprised that they’re beginning to struggle because they may not have previously thought they were prone to depression or anxiety.” What is burnout?“Burnout” is a psych term from the 1970s that basically just means “stress.” Or, rather, it’s a prolonged state of emotional, physical and/or mental exhaustion caused by an accumulation of stress. The result is feeling overwhelmed, emotionally drained, listless, unable to cope. (And, for the record, women are still more likely than men to report having “a great deal of stress.”)“In this case, the stressor is the virus,” Söchting said. “Initially, we didn’t know just how dangerous this was, or how long it would last for. And many people weren’t equipped with good coping skills to handle feeling overwhelmed.” (Data from an Angus Reid study revealed a nation that is “literally depressed.”)Likewise, many people (myself included) aren’t equipped to identify, in themselves, symptoms of anxiety, stress, or burnout. It’s easy to pass off an inability to focus as a desire to do something else, or a period of exhaustion as a consequence of not having slept enough. But many of these easily dismissible things — difficulty focusing/completing daily tasks, lower appetite, and exhaustion, for example — could be markers of something else.Our biological fight-or-flight response could produce other symptomsContrary to what we sometimes believe of our relative “sophistication,” humans are still terrestrial animals, and share a biological stress response system with some of our wildlife friends. That system — what’s called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis — is the thing that allows us to gather up energy to face any life-or-death threats. In many ways, it keeps us alive.The thing is that this pandemic has been crawling on for months now. And, per a piece in The Conversation by Kate Harkness, a professor of psychology and psychiatry at Queen’s University, “the HPA axis doesn’t know the difference between the life-or-death threat of a predator attack and modern stressors.”Modern stressors like … a global pandemic.And since the pandemic continues on, our bodies might continue to perceive an imminent threat, releasing stress hormones that can lead to inflammation of skin, headaches, neck tension, joint pain, stomach aches and other gastrointestinal problems, feelings of depression or loneliness, and more.Listed below are some common signs that you might be experiencing COVID-19-related stress: Sleeping too little or sleeping too muchIf you’re experiencing disturbance in sleep (waking up often, having trouble falling asleep), sleeping more than you’re used to, or rising in the morning without feeling too well-rested, it might be a sign of stress. “Anything more than nine-and-a-half hours could be a sign that you’re hiding, using your bed as a way of checking out,” Söchting said.Excessive drinking or smoking habitsConsuming alcohol, or cannabis, or both, is for many people a way to achieve temporary relief from stress and anxiety. In fact, at the beginning of the pandemic, a Nanos poll found Canadians under 54 were drinking far more at home than they usually did. “It’s easier not to limit how much you’re drinking when you’re doing it at home, because it’s not as though you have to worry about driving or being in public,” Dr. Söchting said. Withdrawal, or avoiding the outdoorsWhen the pandemic hit, lots of people just holed up and became hermetic, as recommended by health authorities. Bedrooms became bunkers, and people stockpiled groceries as though they were bracing for apocalypse. But, several months in, an extended period of avoiding the outdoors could be a sign of stress, anxiety, and/or depression.Struggling with a sense of purpose“It’s easy, with this, to feel as though you don’t have anything to look forward to,” Söchting said. For those who have lost their jobs, it isn’t abnormal to feel like life has less meaning, since suddenly there is less to do. “Many students, too, for example, are wondering about the future of their careers in a world where it isn’t safe to touch other people,” Söchting said. “What if you’re studying to be a physiotherapist, or another job that requires close proximity to other people?”Obsessively monitoring your symptomsRemember at the beginning of the pandemic, when everyone was obsessively washing their hands to the point that there was a rise in hand eczema? Of course, you should still be going about your day as safely as possible — wash your hands, where a mask where necessary, maintain physical distance — but if you’re still obsessively monitoring your symptoms, you could be stressed out.“A lot of anxiety is stemming from people overestimating the probability of them contracting the virus, or convincing themselves that if they go outside, they’ll catch it,” Söchting said. “It’s important to do your research and to be realistic about that probability. We don’t really think so much about danger every time we get into our cars, for example.”An inability to cope with uncertaintyLots of people struggle with generalized anxiety disorder—a condition characterized by persistent and disproportionate concern over any number of issues in daily life. One thing these people might face is what’s called an intolerance of certainty. Since the pandemic is largely qualified by uncertainty (ie. when it will end), a sign you’re experiencing anxiety is excessive worrying, and doing everything you can think of to escape, avoid or eliminate that uncertainty.How to overcome your COVID-19 burnoutIf you’ve been experiencing any of these symptoms, here are some ways you can begin to try to address them:Establish a structure and routine — and stick to itWith the structure of the workday removed for many, you may be finding it difficult to retrieve the rhythm that ordinarily carries you through the week. Dr. Söchting says that one of the best ways to address COVID-19 burnout is treating your days as though you were still going to your job site in the morning — waking up at a consistent time, getting dressed, having breakfast, etc. It can help you to regain your balance. The key is creating a routine, both morning and night, so the days feel less shapeless, and you aren’t spending them just lounging in your pajamas, two winks away from dozing off.Do the exercise you told yourself you’d doMaybe you promised yourself at the very beginning of the pandemic that you’d work out every single day, and you’ve fallen short by more than a mile. (I have.) The thing is that most of us are probably getting less exercise than we’re used to, so we should be making a conscious effort not to neglect getting exercise — which, it bears repeating, can not only help to relieve stress, but also has a positive impact on mental health, memory, sleep quality and overall mood.“It’s also important to support those who are still isolating at home, afraid of going out, and encourage them to get their exercise in” Dr. Söchting says.Find meaningful pursuits outside of work life“We have to accept that our lives are much smaller right now,” Dr. Söchting says, “and, to make up for it, we should be seeking out some joy and meaning outside of our work lives.” Life can become monotonous when there’s very little you’re allowed to do, so finding new and meaningful hobbies can help to add some colour to your day. “Maybe that’s learning to cook certain things, or trying to learn a new language on Duolingo, or something as simple as working on a puzzle.”Not oversleeping, but not under-sleeping either“We don’t need as much sleep right now as we usually do,” Söchting says. Since much of our time, for the most part, is being spent at home, she says we might not be tiring ourselves out as much as we ordinarily would.The key, she says, is to get enough sleep — between seven and nine hours a night — but not too much: anything over nine is oversleeping, and won’t make you feel well-rested. If you’re having trouble falling asleep, there are plenty of things to try: reading, meditating, showering, the “4-7-8” breathing method. “If you’re trying to fall asleep and, after 20 minutes, you still aren’t there, get out of your bed and try a calming activity, or a relaxation exercise,” Söchting says.Making a conscious effort to connect with friends and familyThe pandemic doubles as a crisis in intimacy. We miss our friends. And while virtual connection can never substitute the physical kind, it doesn’t make it any less necessary to our health. “Having less social interactions is especially devastating for those who might not have thriving home or family lives,” Dr. Söchting says. “We have lots of research showing that the fewer groups you feel you are connected with, the poorer your mental health — especially if you’re already vulnerable to depression.”If your mood has been low, consider making an effort to reach out to friends and family more often, whether through video chats or physically distanced hangouts. RELATED How To Avoid Burnout When You're Parenting A Child With Special Needs 5 Signs Your Kid Is Anxious About Going Back To School Toronto's Stage 3 Doesn’t Mean ‘Back To Normal,’ Expert Warns
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All 30 new coronavirus cases in ‘communal living settings’: Saskatchewan government
Saskatchewan health authorities say there are 30 new coronavirus cases in the province, with 174 active cases and 1,347 total recoveries.
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Armed man jumps from moving taxi in Kitchener after dispute with driver: police
Waterloo Regional Police are on the lookout for a man who jumped from a moving taxi after a dispute with the driver.
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Police arrest two in connection with alleged cosmetics Ponzi scheme
The arrests come after a year-long investigation by Toronto Police Financial Crimes Unit – Corporate Crimes Section, dubbed Project Cosmo.
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thestar.com | Toronto Star | Canada's...
Virtual frosh weeks and no-guest dorm policies: Campus life in the age of COVID-19
EDMONTON — As the number of COVID-19 cases spike among the college-age cohort across the country, it is raising  questions about what the return to campus life will be like, and whether the university traditions of frosh week and socials will become something of a bygone era. As lockdowns ease, COVID transmission has been spreading among Canadians in their 20s, leading some health experts this summer to start calling it a “young person’s disease.” “I think it’s probably inevitable, I suppose, as things start to open up … and people are experiencing COVID fatigue and want to socialize,” said University of Alberta infectious disease professor Ameeta Singh. In British Columbia, public health officials have spoken out about partying and other behaviours that have led to a spike in cases among the cohort. Dr. Bonnie Henry, the province’s chief public health officer, said there has been a “rapid increase in the last few weeks in younger people.” Of 4,200 or so active cases in British Columbia, 788 were among those between the ages of 20 and 29, or approximately 19 per cent of cases. In Alberta, where there there are around 1,000 active cases, 234 were among those between 20 and 29, or 23 per cent. In Ontario, of 899 “not resolved” cases, 220 of them are in 20s, or 24 per cent. “I think that people, younger people, do have a tendency to think that they won’t be affected by COVID if they get it,” Singh said. “Perhaps (they are) less (likely) to consider that others in their circle, whether it be parents or grandparents that could potentially be more severely affected were they to become infected.” The case counts in Canada track similarly to the United States, where numerous states have seen exponential rises in cases among younger people. Officials in Texas pinned outbreaks earlier this summer on young people floating down rivers on inflatable tubes. How professors and students across Canada are preparing for a university year like no other Toronto strip club employee may have exposed 500 people to COVID-19 Idris Elba thought he was going to die following COVID-19 diagnosis In Canada, over the course of the pandemic, 15.2 per cent of all COVID-19 cases are among those aged 20 to 29, while 14.3 per cent are among those between 30 and 39. Those aged 40 to 49 account for 15 per cent of all cases. But those aged over 80 comprise 32.7 per cent of hospitalizations from COVID-19, and 71.5 per cent of the nearly 9,000 people who have died. Of those requiring intensive care units, 24.7 per cent are between the age of 60 and 69. The federal government’s data says that less than three per cent of hospital admissions for COVID-19 were among those between the ages of 20 and 29, and accounted for 3.6 per cent of those in the ICU. The 20-29 cohort accounted for only 0.1 per cent of the total deaths from COVID-19. The coronavirus may be called a young persons disease now, but it remains most serious among the older population. Many universities and colleges have shifted to remote classes for September. And while there might not be a lot schools can do about off-campus behaviour, where most bars and restaurants are now open, campuses across Canada are attempting to control what they can, with enhanced cleaning and signage and physical-distancing measures. “The safety and well-being of our students, staff, faculty, instructors and researchers remains our utmost priority,” says a statement from Montreal’s McGill University. Most schools seem to have at least some opportunities for in-person interaction. Two of Canada’s largest universities —  University of British Columbia and University of Toronto, will have mostly online classes, but will also be running in-person classes with physical-distancing requirements. McGill University in Montreal is working on orientation activities for new students that can be done virtually. An article in the McGill Reporter says the “regular programming” of frosh week has been modified. “They replaced regular programming like Beach Day and campus tours with activities like a virtual scavenger hunt, a cooking show, painting, yoga and fitness classes, TikTok challenges, trivia nights, bingo, a virtual escape room, and Zoom-facilitated meet-n-greets,” the article says. At the University of Alberta, student groups are planning virtual orientation activities for new students and professors have put up videos explaining how they’ve adapted their courses for remote learning. Some technical programs at colleges face particular challenges. Algonquin College in Ottawa has a mandatory mask policy on campus, in accordance with Ottawa Public Health guidelines, and says it has reconfigured workspaces, such as labs and shops, to comply with physical-distancing requirements. Dalhousie University in Halifax also has a mandatory mask policy, as does the University of Calgary. In Calgary, there’s yet another twist: campus residences have had to set up isolation rooms where those suspected of catching COVID-19 can self-isolate for the required amount of time. The university also notes there is a “no guest policy” in effect for students living in residence. Memorial University in Newfoundland, which is recommending masks, also says that students and staff should keep a diary of who they’ve come in contact with on campus. “If you are on campus, reduce socializing in public spaces, and remain in your office as much as possible,” says its website. “People still need to bear in mind some of the restrictions that have been put in place,” said Singh. “That needs to be maintained throughout the pandemic.” • Email: tdawson@postmedia.com | Twitter: tylerrdawson
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Ford Feels Sorry For Strip Club Patrons’ Partners After COVID-19 Case
Ontario Premier Doug Ford says he feels sorry for the spouses and partners of the hundreds of people potentially exposed to COVID-19 at a Toronto strip club.“I feel sorry for the people when they go to their house and tell them that they were at the Brass Rail, that’s who I feel sorry for,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to be on the end of that one.”Ford was responding to news from Toronto Public Health that 550 people could have been exposed to the virus after a Brass Rail employee, who has since tested positive, worked four days last week. He was asked about whether the incident made him anxious given the focus on keeping community transmission of the virus down so schools can safely reopen, or whether things like this are bound to happen and show the importance of following up on cases. “Well, it’s about follow-up,” Ford said. READ MORE: Hundreds Possibly Exposed To COVID-19 At Toronto Strip Club Vancouver Strip Club Visitors Warned Of COVID-19 Exposure Toronto Restaurant Under Fire After Video Shows Crammed Party On Patio Toronto Public Health (TPH) said it has followed up with close contacts and asked the individuals to self isolate for 14 days and get a COVID-19 test, a message Ford repeated. The public health agency is also contacting the individuals whose names were in the Brass Rail’s contact-tracing log.“You gotta practise social distancing, you gotta put on a mask,” Ford said. “I know that sounds ironic, talking about that, but you have to.”WATCH: Ford says contact-tracing app ‘critical’ tool in containing COVID-19. Story continues below. Dr. Vinita Dubey, Toronto’s Associate Medical Officer, told CTV News that the strip club was not following physical distancing guidelines between tables, or between staff and some customers. Its visitor log was also incomplete, she said.The premier added that the strip club should be treated like any other business, and that the province could send in health inspectors. “They gotta follow the protocols, that’s it. Practise social distancing. I know it sounds crazy when you’re talking about the Brass Rail but you just gotta do it,” he said.
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Record lumber prices adding thousands of dollars to new home building costs
On Friday, West Fraser Timber Co. Ltd., Interfor Corp. and Canfor Corp. all rose to new 52-week high stock prices on the Toronto Stock Exchange.
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Dolly Parton makes her feelings known on Black Lives Matter
Country singer Dolly Parton is making it clear that she supports Black Lives Matter.
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New Brunswick poised to head to the polls as Liberals pull out of stability talks
'The Liberal caucus has rejected the premier's proposal to keep his government in power for the next two years.'
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71-year-old man dead after crash in Canard, N.S.
Police, paramedics and the Canning Fire Department responded to reports of a single-vehicle crash on Highway 341. 
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Ottawa bylaw officer fired for ‘excessive use of force’ against a civilian: city
The City of Ottawa has fired a bylaw officer who they say used excessive force against a resident back in April.
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This Viral TikTok Video Is Making Mothers Everywhere Tear Up
Here’s a cross section of headlines, all about mothers, published by the North American media over the last couple of months: “Pandemic Could Scar A Generation Of Working Mothers”; “How The Pandemic Could Force A Generation Of Mothers Out Of The Workforce”; “Pandemic Childcare Is Way More Stressful For Moms Than Dads” “Moms Are Not Okay: Pandemic Triples Anxiety And Depression Symptoms In New Mothers.”Do you see the common thread?Yes, there is the fact of a pandemic. But there’s also the stark reality of how that pandemic has affected the health of mothers in particular — mothers who, on average, spend significantly more time caregiving than fathers do, even when they’re employed full-time. To say the least, moms are struggling. So is everyone else, but it’s kind of different. It’s hard enough to raise a kid as it is, never mind while dealing with the anxieties that inevitably accompany a global pandemic. All of this might explain the sudden popularity of a recent TikTok video, in which a mother commiserates with the myriad pressures so many moms are facing right now.@swirl_lifeThis was on my heart HEAVY this morning. If you care, Share with a mom you LOVE #fyp#foryou#foryoupage#foru#momlife#selfcare#momsupport#support♬ original sound - swirl_life“Hi, this video is for the mother on TikTok right now. So if you are not a mother, please continue to scroll and enjoy your For You page,” the video begins. The woman in it, whose handle is @swirl_life, pauses. She waits for the non-mothers to continue scrolling. But if you stick around, what follows is a message so earnest it makes you want to tear up.“Hi. Now that we’re alone — how are you? Did you get any sleep last night? I know you’re worried. There’s so much pressure on you right now,” she says. “I know nobody checks on you because you are so strong, but I just want you to know that I’m here. I’m here for you, Sis. Keep going. You are amazing, and I appreciate you.”The video has already racked up more than 2.7 million views on TikTok. There are 65,000 comments underneath the clip, many of them from mothers explaining how they’ve been feeling lately, and what the video means to them.“You have no idea how many moms’ hearts you just touched. We are never seen,” said one mother.“So I’m two weeks postpartum… and I just burst into tears,” wrote another. “I had to tell my husband that I’m not OK today… and I need help. It’s not easy.”Watch: How some people are coping with their COVID-19 stress and anxiety. Story continues below.The TikTok app is mostly a place where bored teenagers with lots of time on their hands post videos of pranks, dancing or funny skits. But it seems there’s also room for clips offering love and support to those who need it.As one mother wrote, after watching the viral video: “I wish I had someone like you in my life to ask me these things.”RELATED 5 Signs Your Kid Is Anxious About Going Back To School Jodie Turner-Smith Gave Birth At Home To Avoid Systemic Racism In Hospitals Katy Perry Says 7 Days Of Therapy Made Her Ready To Be A Mother Also on HuffPost Canada:
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Coronavirus: London-Middlex reports 2 new cases Friday, including health-care worker
The two most recent cases reported by the Middlesex-London Health Unit involve a health-care worker in their 30s, and someone in their 40s.
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Laval teen Fernandez lone Canadian woman in U.S. Open tennis draw
Fernandez has been one of the fastest-rising talents on the WTA Tour and heads into the U.S. Open with a 15-6 record on the year.
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Okanagan Similkameen regional district targeted by ransomware attack
According to the regional district, staff were alerted to the attempted attack on Tuesday, Aug. 11.
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EMSB agrees to lease St-Michel's St. Dorothy school to French system until 2022
A St-Michel building owned by the English Montreal School Board is getting a new tenant.
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Majority of New Brunswickers don’t support call for provincial election: study
"A slim majority of New Brunswickers express opposition to holding an election in the fall, while one-third support the idea."
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Toronto police release surveillance videos of suspects moments before fatal east-end shooting
The videos appear to show the suspects before they left the scene of the shooting.
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