'We don’t want to end up like Montreal,' Quebec City residents say

COVID-19 cases in provincial capital are at their highest levels, leaving residents concerned and health officials scrambling.
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City of Edmonton expects ‘peaceful and voluntary closure’ of Old Strathcona camp by Sept. 28
More local social service providers have been invited to visit the Peace Camp this week and organizers have agreed to peacefully vacate Wilbert McIntyre Park by Sept. 28.
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Montreal woman accused of sending poisonous letter to Donald Trump says she sent nine in total to various targets: police
By Adrian Humphreys and Michelle Lalonde A Canadian woman arrested by U.S. authorities for allegedly sending envelopes of poisonous ricin to U.S. President Donald Trump has been telling the FBI where else she mailed toxic letters — nine in all — police say. As authorities in the United States worked to track down all of the letters the woman allegedly sent, RCMP officers donned hazmat suits to search an apartment near Montreal Monday linked to the woman arrested crossing from Canada into the United States on Sunday. There are no known injuries from the poison letters. Although not formally named by U.S. authorities because she has not yet made her initial court appearance, the woman has been independently identified as Pascale Cécile Véronique Ferrier, 53, of Saint Hubert, Que.. After her arrest, she has been cooperative — possibly one reason why her court appearance was pushed back from Monday until late Tuesday afternoon — and allegedly revealed a series of other toxic letters, including several to two law enforcement agencies in Texas where she was arrested last year, National Post was told. The woman is scheduled to have an initial appearance in Buffalo federal court Tuesday at 4 p.m., according to Department of Justice officials. U.S. border agents arrested a traveller Sunday afternoon at the border after crossing the Peace Bridge from Fort Erie, Ont., into Buffalo, NY, said Aaron Bowker of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. She had a gun with her, a law enforcement source said. On Sunday, the RCMP confirmed the FBI requested help over a suspicious letter that tested positive for toxic ricin that appeared to have been sent from Canada. Monday morning, the RCMP executed a search warrant at an apartment in St-Hubert, just south of Montreal. “We know that a female suspect was arrested by our U.S. colleagues last night,” RCMP spokesperson Corporal Charles Poirier said. “There is a clear link between her and this residence that we are searching today.” The RCMP’s Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, Explosives team (CBRNE), a specialized team composed of members of the RCMP and the Canadian Armed Forces, led the operation in St-Hubert. “It is believed at this point that there was a highly toxic substance inside those packages. The word ricin has been mentioned. However, at this point, we are not taking any chances, hence the deployment we have here today.” Police evacuated some apartments on the fourth floor of the building, near the one being searched, but not the whole building. Letters containing ricin were also mailed to two law enforcement agencies in Texas; Ferrier had been arrested by each agency last year, court documents show. “I can confirm that envelopes, containing the deadly toxin ricin, was mailed to me and three of my detention staff,” Hidalgo County Sheriff Eddie Guerra said in a statement. What is ricin? Here's what you need to know about the deadly poison Woman arrested at U.S.-Canada border after American officials discover ricin in letter addressed to Trump A spokesman for the sheriff’s office, Sgt. Frank Medrano, said the envelopes arrived on Sept. 15 and turned over to U.S. federal authorities. Another letter was sent to the chief of the Mission Police Department, in Mission, Texas, which is a city within Hidalgo County. That letter, addressed to the police chief, was only discovered Monday morning when the department was asked to look for it by U.S. authorities, Investigator Art Flores of Mission police told National Post. “She was detained or arrested, she admitted to somebody, I don’t know who, maybe the FBI agents, that there was nine letters sent out and one was addressed to the Mission Police Department,” Flores said. The chief found the letter, which had not been opened. “They came in, the FBI, and took custody of it,” he said. Hidalgo County court records show Ferrier was arrested by the sheriff’s office on March 12, 2019. She was arrested for using a false Texas driver’s licence and jailed pending court proceedings. Court records list a charge of tampering with a government record, in reference to the driver’s licence. The prosecution moved to dismiss the charge against her because it was her first and only offense and she had already served 20 days in jail awaiting court. The dismissal was accepted May 17, 2019, records show. Records from the Mission Police Department, a city within in Hildago County, show a Pascale Ferrier of “Lavell, Qc” (possibly a misspelling of Laval) was charged with two counts of unlawful carrying of a weapon and one count of tampering with government records, offences alleged to have occurred on Dec. 3, 2019. She was likely deported to Canada afterwards. It is not known if all nine letters have been accounted for. A woman with the same name and appearance as the Texas mug shots, living in St.-Hubert and with similar biodata has social media presence suggesting she is a self-employed technology worker originally from France who arrived in Canada around 2008. A Facebook post in 2015 declares her joy at becoming a Canadian citizen. Social media accounts appearing to be hers suggest a fondness for desserts, recreational vehicles and dogs. A Twitter account in her name also tweeted an anti-Tump threat. It has not been confirmed the accounts belong to the woman charged. • Email: ahumphreys@nationalpost.com | Twitter: AD_Humphreys You might also be interested in… Jordan Peterson’s year of ‘absolute hell’: Professor forced to retreat from public life because of addiction If North Korea’s Kim Jong Un dies, who will be his successor? ‘Everybody will love it’: A four-day work week could help rebuild Canada’s economy post-COVID-19, experts say
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Certification hearing begins in MMIWG class-action lawsuit against federal government, RCMP
The proposed suit alleges systemic negligence from the RCMP while investigating dozens of cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.
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Trial for pediatrician charged with sex assault begins in Lethbridge
An Alberta doctor is on trial in Lethbridge for sexual assault involving an underage girl that occurred during a trip to Waterton Lakes National Park.
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What is ricin? Here's what you need to know about the deadly poison
A woman was arrested at the U.S.-Canada border near Buffalo, New York on Sunday, after allegedly sending a ricin-filled envelope to the White House, the RCMP said. Here’s what you need to know about the deadly poison. Ricin is found naturally in castor beans, which are typically pressed to make castor oil. The oil, which is used as a traditional remedy for constipation and to induce labour, does not contain ricin. The deadly poison is left behind in the pulp. According to the Bethesda, Maryland-based National Center for Biotechnology Information, someone has died from ingesting just two castor beans. But ricin is only released if the outer shell of the bean is broken or chewed. Ricin can also be extracted from castor beans and purified in order to make a potent biological weapon. Initial symptoms appear within four to 10 hours and may include colicky abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea and heartburn. If prepared properly, ricin can cause death within 36 to 72 hours and no known antidote exists. Woman arrested at U.S.-Canada border after American officials discover ricin in letter addressed to Trump Envelope with deadly poison ricin addressed to White House intercepted: reports Ricin is often found in powder form or in pellets and can also be turned into an aerosol. It is deadliest when it is inhaled. An amount the size of a grain of salt is enough to kill an adult. Ricin has been sent to politicians and officials in the United States in the past. In 2014, James Everett Dutschke got 25 years in prison for sending ricin to then-U.S. president Barack Obama and two other officials in an effort to frame his rival Paul Kevin Curtis. No one was harmed. The same year, actress Shannon Richardson got 18 years for sending ricin-laced letters to Obama and then New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg in an attempt to frame her husband. The poison was infamously used in the assassination of Georgi Markov, a dissident Bulgarian writer who defected to the West in 1969. He died on Sept. 11, 1978 after an assassin jabbed his thigh with an umbrella while he was waiting for a bus in London. National Post with files from Reuters
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Non-Indigenous fishermen, N.S. First Nations urge more federal involvement in lobster dispute
OTTAWA – A stand-off over lobster fishing in Nova Scotia is testing a 21-year-old Supreme Court decision that affirmed Indigenous people’s right to fish, with both sides calling on the federal government to get more involved. The stand-off reached a crisis point this weekend as commercial fishers pulled Indigenous set lobster traps, from the waters of St. Mary’s Bay, near Saulnierville, N.S., about three hours west of Halifax. Colin Sproul, president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association, said the Indigenous set traps are illegal and are devastating the lobster population. “St. Mary’s is an incredibly important lobster spawning ground, where lobsters conduct their reproductive life cycle through the summertime and that spawning ground is being destroyed.” Indigenous fishers said they intend to return their traps to the water as soon as Monday evening, but Sproul said his members will stand in the way of that. “We’re not leaving the bay until everyone leaves the bay.” The dispute has a direct connection to the 1999 Supreme Court decision in the case of Donald Marshall, an Indigenous man accused of illegally fishing for eels. The court found Marshall and other Indigenous people had a treaty right to fish for a “moderate livelihood.” The term moderate livelihood has never been specifically defined and negotiation between Mi’kmaq Indigenous leaders and the federal government on the shape of the fishery have been taking place since the decision. The Supreme Court said some restrictions could be put in place for conservation, but generally said Indigenous people had a right to fish. https://nationalpost.com/news/fishermen-say-they-are-removing-indigenous-lobster-traps-in-western-nova-scotia Nova Scotia First Nation to launch lobster fleet amid tension on the wharf How Donald Trump boosted Nova Scotia's lucrative lobster industry Rhonda Overbrook, director of operations with the Sipekne’katik First Nation, said they’re attempting to live that right by setting up their own regulated fishery. She said the traps they placed in the water were meant to give them information about the health of the fishery, so they could set limits and guidelines. “We need to collect the data about our fishery management and right now, we don’t have any data because the commercial fishermen have cut our lines,” she said. The federal government has spent hundreds of millions since the Marshall decision buying commercial licences and turning them over to Indigenous communities, as well as providing financial support for training and equipment purchase. Sproul said commercial fishers don’t dispute that Indigenous people have the right to fish, but they believe there have to be limits. He said Indigenous leadership have leased the licences the federal government purchased to commercial fishers, cutting their own people out of the catch. He said the federal government has to take responsibility and enforce the rules for the health of the entire industry. “We hope to demonstrate to the Canadian people that our fight isn’t with Indigenous fishers, that our fight is with the federal government,” he said. On Monday, the commercial fishers switched tactics and staged a large protest outside the home of someone they believe is buying from the Sipekne’katik boats. Sproul said even though the catch numbers are low, people buying lobsters caught outside of the regulated season are putting the broader industry in peril. “They’re stealing from our communities and from First Nations at the same time. And today, we take our arguments to them and let them know that we won’t stand for it anymore.” Knockwood said the Indigenous fishers are a small fleet with only seven boats and no threat to a productive lobster fishery. “We have a mosquito fleet. We’re talking 25 foot boats compared to 50 or 60. We’re talking 50 traps on a boat compared to 350,” she said. She said they’re not trying to take anything away from the commercial fishers, but the federal department of fisheries and oceans needs to protect them and their rights on the water. “They’re in between rock and a hard place, but the bottom line is that we don’t have a problem with a commercial fishery,” she said. “We just need DFO to protect us on the water because it’s the lives of our fishermen.” Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan was unavailable for an interview, but in a statement said the government’s first goal is safety on the water and she called for all sides to lower tensions. “To that end, I’m extending an invitation for Indigenous leadership and industry leadership to meet with me as soon as possible. It is vitally important that we come together to find the best path forward to a peaceful resolution,” she said. Jordan met virtually Monday with The Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw chiefs. She said the government wants to respect Indigenous rights and come to a constructive conclusion. “The issues surrounding this fishery are longstanding, complex, and deeply personal to all involved. The goal is, and always has been, to further implement First Nations’ rights and have everyone participate in a constructive and productive fishery, for the benefit of all communities in Nova Scotia.” • Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com | Twitter: ryantumilty
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Fixes coming to dangerous Décarie-De Maisonneuve intersection, city hall says
Civil servants are evaluating short-term safety fixes for an N.D.G. intersection where an 84-year-old was killed in a hit-and-run.
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Residents rally for Toronto tenant facing eviction who was set to be removed by sheriffs
"Neighbours here don't want evictions during a pandemic and housing crisis."
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Experts discuss impact of COVID-19 court delays on sexual assault victims
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to delay court proceedings, experts say victims of sexual assault are having to wait longer for legal closure.
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Melfort Mustangs player mourned by teammates, family: ‘everyone loved Dylan’
Melfort Mustangs player Dylan Ashe died in single-vehicle crash along Highway 35 over the weekend.
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Environmental groups say Liberals 'hollow' on environment after accepting Ontario climate plan
OTTAWA — Environmental groups are calling out the Liberal government for its decision to approve a recent carbon tax plan proposed by Ontario, saying it contradicts Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s lofty rhetoric around cutting greenhouse gas emissions. Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson this weekend approved a carbon-pricing scheme proposed by Ontario that seeks to limit emissions by industrial polluters, ending more than a year of negotiations between the two governments. Wilkinson approved the plan despite acknowledging himself that it would “achieve substantially fewer reductions” of greenhouse gas emissions than the federal proposal. The minister also approved New Brunswick’s industrial emitters proposal, which similarly falls short of federal standards, according to environmentalists. Environmental lobbyists say the decision is starkly at odds with the Liberal government’s environmentally-conscious messaging, particularly at a time when it seeks to woo voters through an “ambitious” green recovery plan that could be laid out in this week’s speech from the throne. “Doug Ford gutted Ontario’s climate plan, and the feds are allowing him to do it,” said Keith Stewart, a spokesperson for Greenpeace Canada. “Ontario is not pulling its weight on the climate fight.” Environmental Defence, a climate advocacy group, called Ottawa’s endorsement of the Ontario plan “hollow,” and said it was “extremely disappointed” with the decision. “The federal government stated last week that it needs to act more aggressively to reduce GHG emissions and reach net-zero emissions by 2050,” the group said in a statement. “Today’s approval of a weaker pricing system for industrial polluters in Ontario will do the opposite.” Feds reluctantly approve Ontario and New Brunswick carbon prices for big emitters Two different climate reports come to different conclusions, based on same set of data The weekend agreement with Ontario and New Brunswick highlights the immense challenge facing the Liberal government as it seeks to implement its industrial carbon tax scheme in Canada, which will need to be agreed upon by all provincial leaders. Many provinces have pushed for special exemptions from Ottawa’s carbon taxes, saying they could threaten jobs and investment. Wilkinson was forced to accept Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s carbon tax on heavy emitters in December 2019, even though it neglected to raise its levy to the federally-imposed minimum of $50 per tonne by 2022. The industrial emitters tax is separate from the economy-wide carbon tax, although the latter has absorbed much more public attention because it targets average consumers by marginally raising prices for gasoline. The industrial levy, by comparison, targets major emitters like mining companies, oil refineries and concrete plants. It calls on provinces to raise its industrial carbon tax to $50 per tonne by 2022, after which a new round of provincial-federal negotiations will be required to set new targets. Former environment minister Catherine McKenna officially introduced Ottawa’s plans for tighter climate policies in 2016 through the Pan-Canadian Framework, a document that was supported by all provinces except Saskatchewan. But attitudes toward the framework changed in recent years, after Conservative governments took office in Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario, and created a wall of resistance against the federal environmental policies. Several provincial leaders have levelled court challenges against the economy-wide carbon tax, arguing it amounts to jurisdictional overreach by the federal government. The Supreme Court will host hearings on Tuesday to determine whether Ottawa has the authority to impose the carbon tax in Saskatchewan and Ontario. Analysts and environmental advocates say the Ontario plan is generally more lenient on heavy polluters than the federal plan, which had been in place in the province since 2018. It effectively forces industrial emitters to lower their emissions by a lower share, resulting in few reductions overall, some observers say. “It is an objectively weaker system,” said Sarah Buchanan, a spokesperson for Environmental Defence. “It’s basically less ambitious in every sector.” In a letter to Ontario Environment Minster Jeff Yurek this weekend, Wilkinson acknowledged that the provincial program was “significantly weaker than the federal backstop, and it will result in few emissions reductions.” He said the Ontario program would make it “much more challenging to reach Canada’s 2030 target.” Canada agreed under former prime minister Stephen Harper to reduce its GHG emissions 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030 — a target the Canadian government has always been well short of meeting. The Ontario plan will only reduce emissions by one mega tonne per year, according to the provincial Auditor General, while the province will need to cut roughly 20 mega tonnes per year to meet its 2030 targets. Ottawa says it has been forced to reluctantly support weaker provincial environmental plans in part because of the limited scope of so-called “benchmark assessments,” which effectively lay out the foundational targets for Canadian climate policy. Federal officials in turn sought to agree to new benchmarks with the provinces, which would effectively give Ottawa more authority to enforce stricter climate regulations. “Going forward, the current benchmark assessment will need to be refined and strengthened to ensure that all systems – whether administered by the federal government, or by provincial or territorial governments – achieve meaningful levels of emissions reductions and spur innovation and clean growth,” the minister said in a statement. But environmental advocates point out that Ottawa wrote its own benchmark standards. They argue that Ottawa should be pushing back harder in negotiations, rather than accept provincial plans more or less as they are proposed. “I think the feds should have fought tooth and nail to maintain tougher standards here,” said Greenpeace’s Stewart. He also said Ottawa might be biding its time until the Supreme Court makes its ruling on the carbon tax challenge, which could draw more distinct lines around the limits of federal authority. “What we’re seeing is the provinces in the federal government in a fight over who has jurisdiction,” Stewart said. “And the federal government doesn’t want to push the issue until the Supreme Court has ruled.” • Email: jsnyder@postmedia.com | Twitter: jesse_snyder
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Coronavirus: Two $2,300 tickets handed out for separate parties at same B.C. vacation rental
Both parties were dispersed immediately, RCMP said.
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House of Commons tests virtual voting ahead of throne speech
The Liberal minority government is set to deliver a speech from the throne to lay out an updated version of its pandemic response plan, but also how it intends to guide the country forward afterwards.
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Quebec giving OQLF $5 million to enforce French language charter
The money, earmarked in last March's budget, will pay for 50 additional employees, most of whom will work in the Montreal area.
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‘Opening the eyes and ears’: Lethbridge’s 4th annual Reconciliation Week begins
"I think those kinds of events really show that it's not just talk, it's not just a handshake.”
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Winnipeg Jets netminder Connor Hellebuyck voted NHL’s top goalie
Winnipeg Jets goalie Connor Hellebuyck was named the league's top goalie during a scaled down awards show on Monday night.
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Councillor calls for change to London’s street naming process in wake of Plantation Road petition
The motion from Ward 12 Councillor Elizabeth Peloza is slated to be discussed by the Civic Works Committee on Tuesday.
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Quebec introduces new resources to enforce French language laws
Dozens of new workers are slated to be hired to enforce Quebec's French Language Charter
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Person killed in northeast Calgary stabbing: police
Police responded to the 4800 block of 1 Street N.E. on Monday afternoon.
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Ginsburg's legacy will stand test of time despite rush to replace her: McLachlin
Canada’s former Supreme Court Chief Justice Beverly McLachlin says the legacy of her late friend Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will live on despite immediate political efforts to dismantle her judicial efforts.
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Laval woman who killed friend while driving impaired sentenced to 47 months
The judge delivered a decision that highlighted the immense loss the families of both women have experienced.
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Coronavirus: List of B.C. school exposures
In each case of exposure, anyone directly affected will be contacted by public health officials.
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Why Is There A B.C. Election And Everything Else You Need To Know
After weeks of speculation, cryptic candidate announcements and tight-lipped officials, the ballot box is out of the bag — British Columbians are heading to the polls on Oct. 24.The snap provincial election is the third in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic, following the recently concluded New Brunswick election and the ongoing Saskatchewan race.B.C. Premier John Horgan made the announcement from his home riding in Langdale Monday, arguing that it was time for voters to give his government a new mandate.“It’s never a bad idea to say to British Columbians, who do you want to lead you and where do you want to go,” he told reporters Monday. But for many British Columbians, the election comes as a surprise, considering the province wasn’t set to go to the polls until next fall, according to a signed agreement between Horgan’s minority government and the Green Party. Throw in the global pandemic and concerns of accessibility for voters during the provincial state of emergency, and it’s a heck of a time to head to the ballot box.But that’s what British Columbians will do on Oct. 24. Here’s what you need to know about the snap election and why it’s happening now.When was the election scheduled to happen?The 2017 provincial election resulted in an unprecedented tie between Horgan’s NDP and the B.C. Liberal Party, with 41 seats each. The Green Party won three seats, and entered into an agreement to prop up a minority NDP government.That agreement, the Confidence And Supply Agreement (CASA), dictated that the Greens would vote with the NDP on all votes of confidence, typically throne speeches and budgets. On all other issues they would vote on their own.Under CASA, both the NDP and Green agreed not to trigger an election until the next scheduled date, which was set for the fall of 2021.Why is B.C. having an election now? Last week ahead of election speculation, Horgan argued that the CASA was developed during a very different time, and didn’t apply in the same way now.“When CASA … was created, we did not think that a global pandemic was something we would have to consider,” he said. “The situation today is not the situation last year or, certainly, 2017.”On Monday, Horgan doubled down on the rationale. He argued that an election would give the NDP a new mandate to forge ahead with legislation, citing several examples from the summer where the agreement with the Greens wasn’t ideal.RELATED B.C. Premier Calls Snap Election For October A More Comfortable COVID-19 Test Is Coming For B.C. Children B.C. Will Train Laid Off Service Workers For Essential Health-Care Jobs “The stability that we had over the course of our minority government is not as strong as it was when we began,” he said. Horgan said they can continue with a minority government for another year or “get it over with” and determine what the next four years will hold.“I believe that we are involved in politics, we have been involved in politics for the past three and a half years,” he said. “I believe stability is what’s required not just for 12 months, but for the next four years. That’s what I’m asking British Columbians to support me about, and if they don’t, they don’t.”A stable government is another word for a majority government. And the polls are certainly pointing toward that for Horgan’s NDP. A September Angus Reid poll found that 48 per cent of decided voters polled would vote NDP, 29 per cent would vote for the B.C. Liberal party and 14 per cent would vote Green.“An early election would, indeed, present Horgan and his party with quite the irresistible opportunity, should they choose to take it,” the pollsters said in a press release at the time.Another poll saw Horgan rank as the most favourable premier in Canada, with a 69 per cent approval rating. What do the other parties think?Newly elected Green Party Leader Sonia Furstenau called the decision “irresponsible.”I met with @jjhorgan on Friday and told him he had a stable government. This election is completely unnecessary. The NDP has chosen the pursuit of power over the health and safety of British Columbians. #bcpoli— SoniaFurstenau (@SoniaFurstenau) September 21, 2020Furstenau said the election is “about Horgan and his party putting their fortunes ahead” of the province.“He is out of touch with reality of most BCers right now,” she said.Liberal Party Leader Andrew Wilkinson said Horgan was “putting politics over people” with the call.“We need leadership, we need guidance,” he said Monday. “What are the values of a leader like John Horgan who would call an election during a pandemic?” Wilkinson called the election “unnecessary.” “The only reason for this election is to secure the jobs for the NDP,” Wilkinson said. “It’s unnecessary.”What happens next?The election date is set for Saturday Oct. 24. B.C. Finance Minister Carole James will oversee the functioning of the government during the election period. On Monday, B.C. chief medical officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said the province is preparing for the unique challenges of an election during the COVID-19 pandemic. She said Horgan did not consult her about calling the election, but that she didn’t expect him to.“My role is to provide advice around the health of the population,” she said. “And that is what I will continue to focus on.”Health Minister Adrian Dix will no longer participate in regular COVID-19 briefings, as he will be campaigning, Henry confirmed Monday. The briefings will continue regularly with just Henry going forward.
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Yemen opens new coronavirus hospital after other medical facilities close
In a news release, the International Committee for the Red Cross said the new 60-bed field hospital in Aden has emergency rooms, wards, an X-ray department and a laboratory.
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City will try to limit tax increases, Plante says
While a second COVID-19 wave is "at our doors," Mayor Valérie Plante says she'll present an update on the city finances in the coming weeks.
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980 CKNW: Five facts you didn’t know about late former PM John Turner
Turner was more than an accomplished politician. He was also a star athlete, a gifted student, and a one-time almost member of the Royal Family.
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Gun-wielding B.C. fugitive arrested in high-stakes operation, police say
Police allege Michael Luttman was evading capture by hiding in the surrounding rural areas of Chase.
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City council approves Indigenous names for Edmonton’s new ward boundaries
All 12 of the Indigenous names proposed to Edmonton city council as new names for city wards have been approved.
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Survey finds working Canadians are better off financially, more stressed about money
A new survey has found that Canadians who’ve been able to continue working through the pandemic are in a better spot financially than they were a year ago, but are more stressed about money.
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Allison Hanes: Authorities are begging for our help to save us from ourselves
Quebec authorities are putting on brave faces and using polite language, but behind closed doors they must want to tear out their hair, scream, shout, swear or cry from sheer despair.
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Police search for suspect following hit-and-run involving pedestrian in Midland, Ont.
After a verbal confrontation, OPP say the pickup truck left the scene and that the pedestrian went to the hospital, where they were treated for injuries sustained in the crash.
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Shoreline protection plan approved along Hamilton west harbour waterfront trail
The city says more than 2,300 people use the trail each day, but it has been temporarily closed several times because of wave damage since 2017.
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Why colleges in Canada are ‘hard-wired’ to the communities that surround them
Colleges, which are in Canada's biggest cities and smallest towns, work closely with local industry and community groups when designing their programs and research projects The post Why colleges in Canada are ‘hard-wired’ to the communities that surround them appeared first on Macleans.ca.
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Donald Trump has taken the U.S. down a dark path, and these Canadians are scared of where it leads
At this particular moment, under this particular president, there is a shadow hanging over the perspective of many Canadians when they look south, Edward Keenan writes.
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‘RBG’ documentary filmmakers reflect on Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s extraordinary life
The filmmakers trailed Ginsburg around the country as she gave talks at law schools and other venues. They interviewed her family, close friends and former colleagues.
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Haligonians get ready for hurricane Teddy
Emergency officials ask Nova Scotians to monitor the weather forecasts as a lot can change within the next 24 to 48 hours with hurricane Teddy.
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Which workplaces are hard hit by COVID? Toronto residents aren’t being told. The board of health wants to change that
Transparency around workplaces hard hit by COVID will help protect “vulnerable populations,” councillors say
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Passport Touring ready to hit the road when you are
SUV offers great usability, but drive feel and price are compromises.
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Anthony Davis shows he has what it takes for biggest stage of career
Davis followed his 37 points in Game 1 with 31 more on Sunday, including the Lakers’ last 10.
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Four charts show COVID-19 cases climbing in Ontario — but death rates are low. Don’t be fooled by the lag, experts say
Toronto led the province with 184 new cases Monday, its most since early June
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Racing roundup: Why motorsport should have been on hiatus
Kyle Busch takes a big step backward, IndyCar goes to Music City and all the news and results from the motorsport world.
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RCMP recover body of Calgary man, 23, who fell into the North Saskatchewan River in July
RCMP have recovered the body of 23-year-old Gagandeep Singh Khalsa, who died after falling into the North Saskatchewan River in Banff National Park in late July.
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September Calgary home sales and prices surprise experts; open house activity drops
Calgary's real estate market is surprising realtors with sales and and prices up in September compared to last year.
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Auto news roundup: Volvo clears cabin air, Mazda powers up CX-30, and more
Ford’s Ranger shakeup, Volvo’s new filtration system and a more powerful Mazda CX-30 are among this week’s top stories.
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