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UK hospitals brace for coronavirus peak
Health care workers in London and across the UK are bracing for a peak in the coronavirus outbreak. CNN's Nick Paton Walsh reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Iowa's Spencer Lee wins Hodge Trophy after dominant season
Spencer Lee of Iowa has been voted the winner of the Dan Hodge Trophy as the most dominant college wrestler in the nation.
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foxnews.com
World stocks rally after Chinese data boost to close worst quarter since 2008
World stocks looked set to close their worst quarter since 2008 on a brighter note on Tuesday, as strong Chinese factory data held out hope for an economic revival even as much of the rest of the world shut down to fight the coronavirus.
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reuters.com
'There's no blueprint' - Virus upends college recruiting
After Michigan lost to Ohio State in the semifinals of the women's Big Ten Tournament, coach Kim Barnes Arico and her staff immediately hit the road.
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foxnews.com
Today on Fox News: March 31, 2020
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foxnews.com
'The Good Doctor' Season 3 Ending Explained: Who Died and What It Means for the Next Season
"The Good Doctor" Season 3, Episode 20 ended with a tragic ending for one medic, while another got the happy ending fans have been waiting for.
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newsweek.com
Van Gogh painting stolen from Dutch museum closed by coronavirus
A painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh was stolen in an overnight smash-and-grab raid on a museum that was closed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, police and the museum said Monday.
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foxnews.com
Man awaiting liver transplant gets some hope during coronavirus outbreak
Zach Branson can once again look forward to getting a new lease on life now that his liver transplant has been rescheduled after being put on hold because of the coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Social distancing guidelines, USNS Comfort, work disruptions: 5 things to know Tuesday
The White House to weigh in on additional social distancing, the USNS Comfort Navy hospital ship could be ready for NYC patients and more you need to know Tuesday.      
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usatoday.com
New York hospital tells ER doctors to ‘think more critically’ about who gets ventilators
NYU Langone Health, one of the nation’s top academic medical centers, told emergency-room doctors that they have “sole discretion” to place patients on ventilators and institutional backing to “withhold futile intubations.”
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foxnews.com
Nearly 100,000 Sign Petition Calling For End To Live Coverage Of Trump's Coronavirus Briefings
"Leave the President's insults, false braggadocio, and outright lies on the editing room floor, where they belong," the petition states.
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newsweek.com
Is Houseparty Safe? Video App Denies Hack, Offers $1 Million Reward for Proof of 'Paid Commercial Smear Campaign'
"All Houseparty accounts are safe—the service is secure, has never been compromised, and doesn't collect passwords for other sites," the official Twitter account said today after hack rumors.
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newsweek.com
WHO Warns Coronavirus Pandemic 'Far From Over' in Asia-Pacifc, Urges States to Prepare for 'Large-Scale Community Transmission'
As China begins to relax some of its coronavirus-related restrictions, a senior World Health Organization official said the risk has not gone away.
3 m
newsweek.com
Doctor: Here's how San Francisco is beating the odds on the coronavirus — so far
If we let our guard down, resume normal activities too soon, fail to do aggressive testing and quarantine, we risk planting seeds for later tragedies.       
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usatoday.com
US hits grim milestone as coronavirus deaths hit 3,000, New York remains epicenter
foxnews.com
States with Republican Governors Delayed Action on Social Distancing Measures, Study Finds
Social distancing measures in states with Republican governors and more Trump voters were delayed by 2.7 days, according to University of Washington research.
newsweek.com
Did a Cat Really Get COVID-19 from Its Owner in Belgium?
Coronavirus symptoms were detected in the cat after the owner tested positive for COVID-19.
newsweek.com
Ford to produce roughly 50,000 ventilators in fight against coronavirus
Ford Motor Company has announced plans to make 50,000 ventilators at one of its Michigan plants over the next 100 days in an effort to arm those on the front lines with equipment to fight COVID-19.
foxnews.com
Stress eating these days? Here's some help
Stress eating is something that many people struggle with on a regular basis, when things are "normal." But with the coronavirus pandemic challenging us in different ways each day, it seems to have become an equal opportunity problem, affecting even those who don't typically eat in response to anxiety or other emotions.
edition.cnn.com
Trump’s reversals, under media pressure, lead to tougher stance on virus
President Trump is now grappling with a grim reality.
foxnews.com
Watch BTS perform from quarantine on James Corden's 'Homefest' special
K-pop supergroup BTS was among the acts that performed on James Corden's 'Homefest' special on Monday night.
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latimes.com
Nurse practitioner: In 20 years, I've never seen it this bad
Nurse practitioner Elyse Isopo says that in the 20 years she's been working in a New York ICU, she has never seen things as bad as they are now with the coronavirus.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump's metric of success reveals his leadership flaws
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edition.cnn.com
Wisconsin college students return home from spring break with coronavirus
An undisclosed number of college students returning from a Spring Break trip to Alabama’s beaches have tested positive for coronavirus, according to news reports.
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foxnews.com
Rash of coronavirus deaths, infections at Massachusetts facility for vets
A coronavirus outbreak at a Massachusetts health care facility that houses veterans has claimed the lives of five residents and six more are suspected of dying from the illness. A total 11 other veterans residing at the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home have tested positive for the virus, according to MassLive.com. Twenty-five other veterans are awaiting their...
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nypost.com
China PMI offers tiny relief to Asia as stocks head for dire end to quarter
Asian shares were set to close out a calamitous quarter by eking out a small rally on Tuesday as factory data from China held out the hope of a revival in activity, even as much of the rest of the world shut down.
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reuters.com
Prince Harry and Meghan officially start their non-royal life. Here's what that will look like
When the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced they would be giving up their senior royal roles to become "financially independent," it sent shock waves through the British establishment and became the topic of intense debate across the country and beyond.
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edition.cnn.com
Prince Harry and Meghan officially start their non-royal life. Here's what that will look like
The couple have relinquished their royal duties as of March 31. What comes next is reinvention.
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edition.cnn.com
11 veterans at a Massachusetts home for soldiers have died. 5 tested positive for coronavirus
Eleven veterans who live at the Soldiers' Home in Holyoke, Massachusetts, have died and five of them tested positive for coronavirus, Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse told CNN Monday.
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edition.cnn.com
New Yorkers baffled over ‘unsettling’ Empire State Building siren display
New Yorkers were left spooked Monday night by a glaring Empire State Building light display intended to honor emergency workers fighting coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Man ‘teaching his dog to drive’ leads cops on high speed chase
He’s blaming man’s best friend. A Washington state motorist led police on a chase Sunday — and when he was finally stopped, he said he was teaching his dog how to drive. Cops found the pup in the driver’s seat when they pulled over the 51-year-old man, who allegedly was speeding at 100 mph from...
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nypost.com
Zao Wou-Ki, the Chinese abstract painter who sells for millions
Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Vincent van Gogh -- in 2019, Zao Wou-Ki outsold them all. In fact, the $238 million generated by the late painter's art at auctions last year was surpassed only by sums achieved Picasso and Monet.
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edition.cnn.com
Zao Wou-Ki, the Chinese abstract painter who sells for millions
At auctions last year, Zao Wou-Ki's work outsold that of every artist in the world, aside from Picasso and Monet. Now, a Hong Kong exhibition is exploring how the late painter reconciled Eastern and Western influences.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus cases top 786,000 globally
The novel coronavirus pandemic continues to impact countries worldwide, particularly in Europe and the US. Follow here for live updates.
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edition.cnn.com
How the House approved the coronavirus bill
Let’s explore what happened during the coronavirus debate last week.
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foxnews.com
The Problem With Being ‘at War’ With the Coronavirus
If curbing the spread of the coronavirus is akin to being “at war,” then it is unlike any war the world has ever fought.Still, the irregularity of this particular fight hasn’t stopped leaders from invoking wartime imagery. In China, where the outbreak began earlier this year, Xi Jinping vowed to wage a “people’s war” on the coronavirus. As the disease spread across the globe, the battle allusions followed. France’s Emmanuel Macron declared the country at war with an “invisible, elusive” enemy. Italy’s special commissioner for the coronavirus emergency said the country must equip itself for a “war economy.” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told Britons that theirs was a fight in which each and every citizen was “directly enlisted.” In the United States, Donald Trump refashioned himself as a “wartime president.”By choosing to frame the pandemic in military terms, governments are clearly trying to communicate the gravity of this public-health crisis—one that requires the type of state intervention and personal sacrifice most nations haven’t experienced in peacetime. But drawing this imperfect parallel can have the unintended consequence of causing fear and panic too. One look at the barren supermarket shelves and the surge in U.S. firearm sales suggests that it may have already had that impact. If the aim of such imagery is to compel the public to act in the national interest, framing this crisis in war terms may achieve just the opposite. In this “war,” after all, most people aren’t being asked to mobilize; they are being asked to stay home.[Read: A letter from wartime France]The last time the world faced a pandemic of this scale, it was in the middle of an actual war. The Spanish flu appeared during the waning months of World War I, before quickly spreading around the world, infecting a third of the global population and killing tens of millions of people. Unlike with the current pandemic, invoking wartime imagery wasn’t necessary to spur action against the Spanish flu. By that point in the war, “everyone had already been making all these sacrifices,” Mark Honigsbaum, a medical historian and the author of The Pandemic Century, told me, noting that many countries were already united against a common enemy, Germany, “before this unseen enemy, the Spanish flu, came along.”There is a long history of world leaders framing fights against disease within the context of war. From Richard Nixon’s “war on cancer” to the “Ebola wars,” politicians have invoked battle analogies to communicate the seriousness of an issue and galvanize a national response. (The same can be said for matters that have nothing to do with disease, such as Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty and the global War on Terror.)In some ways, these wartime metaphors make sense. John Baugh, a linguist at Washington University in St. Louis, told me that when politicians and health officials invoke this language, it’s often because “they feel that the public has not yet taken the problem seriously,” an issue that, until very recently, was almost certainly the case with the coronavirus pandemic. Many countries were slow to figure out how best to respond to the crisis, while large swaths of their populations openly flouted social-distancing guidance. When the severity finally began to sink in, world leaders seized on terms such as battle plan, enemy, and frontline as a means of waking people up to the urgency of the situation and fostering a sense of solidarity.But while wartime imagery can promote national cohesion, it can also breed fear, which can in turn drive anxiety and panic. The myriad changes being made to wage this “war”—including enforced lockdowns, closures of schools and businesses, and the postponement of major events, such as elections—and the looming prospect of a global recession has not only created uncertainty, but stripped many people of any sense of control. One of the most visible ways this fear has manifested has been in the increasing prevalence of empty supermarkets—a by-product of what appeared to be a surge in panic-buying that made newly precious commodities such as hand sanitizer, face masks, and toilet paper scarce or, in some cases, prohibitively expensive. (Other items, such as illicit drugs and firearms, experienced a similar increase in demand.) In this case, evoking war didn’t just alert people to the severity of the situation. For some of the most vulnerable members of society, including the elderly and health-care workers, it made the crisis much, much worse.[Read: How panic-buying revealed the problem with the modern world]Another problem with using battle analogies is that they aren’t particularly well suited for telling people what not to do. “War metaphors call for mobilization, for action, for doing something,” Veronika Koller, a linguist at Lancaster University in England, told me. In this pandemic, governments are asking people to do the opposite: to forego normal routines and avoid going outside. Put simply, to do nothing.War metaphors also tend to be, well, metaphorical. They lack precision and clarity, both of which are in desperately short supply right now. In Britain, where the response to the coronavirus outbreak was slow and ill-defined, Johnson’s announcement that the country would be put on a wartime footing didn’t explain what that actually meant. “From a linguistic point of view, it’s still not clear,” Koller said in reference to the prime minister’s televised address last week announcing further restrictions as part of a nationwide lockdown. When it comes to what Britons should or shouldn’t do, Koller added, “there are still lots of modifiers in there, like if possible and ideally or only if necessary. And that muddies the message.”War is also, by its very nature, divisive—which is not particularly helpful amid a crisis that requires global cooperation. These divisions have already begun playing out among people, most notably with the rise of xenophobia against East Asian communities and those perceived to be likely carriers of the virus. But they have started to appear at the diplomatic level too, in the form of a blame game between the U.S. and China over which country is responsible for the pandemic.[Read: The other problematic outbreak]If wartime terminology isn’t suitable for explaining a pandemic, then what is? When I put this question to Koller, she said there probably isn’t just one correct framing or metaphor. Rather, “it’s about finding a balance between galvanizing people and making them aware that they have to take this seriously and ... not sending them into complete panic.”Some leaders have already demonstrated ways of reframing the pandemic that are less likely to spur panic. In Denmark, Queen Margrethe II likened the virus to a “dangerous guest,” and urged Danes to “show our togetherness by keeping apart.”Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the World Health Organization, invoked perhaps the one thing that is better than any war at rallying nations: sport. “You can’t win a football game only by defending,” he wrote on Twitter. “You have to attack as well.”
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theatlantic.com
Growth in Australia coronavirus cases slows, but experts urge caution
Australia on Tuesday reported a sustained fall in the country's rate of new coronavirus infections but officials and experts warned against complacency, stressing the need for further strict social distancing policies.
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reuters.com
Coronavirus cases top 784,000 globally
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edition.cnn.com
Stranded Cruise Ship Hit by Coronavirus Begs Florida to Allow Passengers and Crew to Disembark
Hundreds of passengers and crew members from the Zaandam have not stepped on dry land for 15 days
3 h
time.com
His parents waited years to go on a cruise and now they're stuck at sea after passengers test positive for coronavirus
A Holland America cruise ship is heading toward the United States looking for a port while the voyage has turned, according to the son of one couple aboard, into a "nightmare scenario."
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edition.cnn.com
Empire State Building flashes red to honor first responders
The top of the New York City landmark has a siren-like light revolving around its famed needle.
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cbsnews.com
John Wooden’s last UCLA hurrah turns 45 years old
He had built this remarkable pyramid of success, and now John Wooden was coaching the UCLA Bruins for the last time. Only Kentucky was standing between Wooden and his 10th national championship in 12 years. This was 1975, the year after high-flying David Thompson and North Carolina State had ended UCLA’s string of seven consecutive...
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nypost.com
California sheriff reverses order closing gun stores
Los Angeles County Sheriff Alex Villanueva announced he will no longer order that gun stores be temporarily closed during the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Country singer Kalie Shorr tests positive for coronavirus
Yet another celebrity has announced that they’re fighting coronavirus, and this time, it’s Kalie Shorr. The 25-year-old country music star took to Twitter on Monday to discuss her diagnosis. “Despite being quarantined (except for a handful of trips for groceries) for three weeks, I managed to contract COVID 19,” stated Shorr. “I’m feeling significantly better,...
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nypost.com
Idaho governor signs two anti-transgender bills into law
One measure bans transgender girls from playing on girls' and women's sports teams, while the other prevents transgender people from changing their gender on Idaho birth certificates.
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edition.cnn.com
Doctor: I want my kids to know this 'if they lose me' to coronavirus
Dr. Cornelia Griggs speaks with CNN's Don Lemon about what she's seeing every shift in her hospital, and what she wants her children to know in case they lose her to coronavirus.
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edition.cnn.com
Former Jet Brandon Copeland giving back again with ‘life’ webinar for NFL players
Brandon Copeland has a game on Tuesday. Kickoff is at 5 p.m. Eastern. Coronavirus be damned. That’s when the first in a series of webinars Copeland has created begins for fellow NFL players in which he’ll offer life advice that includes time and financial management. It’s fitting the class Copeland teaches at the University of...
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nypost.com