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Trump: Americans can wear face coverings amid coronavirus outbreak — if they want to
President Trump on Friday announced that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  had issued new guidelines urging Americans on a voluntary basis to wear face coverings — but stopped short of recommending that they use the masks to protect themselves from the worsening coronavirus pandemic. “The CDC is advising the use of non-medical cloth...
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nypost.com
"CBS Evening News" headlines for Friday, April 3, 2020
Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell."
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cbsnews.com
Food bank works with online marketplace to provide jobs
"This is great money, and a good opportunity to— to keep my spirits high," one laid-off bartender said.
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cbsnews.com
Trump recommends Americans wear masks, but adds: 'I don't think I'm going to be doing it'
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edition.cnn.com
Trump: Won't wear a coronavirus mask because it would interfere with foreign leader meetings
President Trump said wearing a mask would interfere with his ability to meet with foreign presidents, prime ministers and "dictators."        
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usatoday.com
Economy in shambles, Trump scrambles for new 2020 message
As the coronavirus destroys the economy, Trump struggles to find a new reelection message.
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latimes.com
Acosta to Trump: Who dropped the ball on pandemic preparation?
CNN's Jim Acosta asks President Donald Trump who in his administration dropped the ball on preparing for a possible pandemic, citing the lack of masks and other medical equipment.
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edition.cnn.com
Supplies could be delayed due to confusion from the White House, companies say
More than a week after President Donald Trump said he would authorize the use of a wartime-era law to force General Motors to produce ventilators, the company still hasn't received a formal order from the federal government. GM, as a result, hasn't allowed private companies or hospitals to place orders, according to a source familiar with the matter.
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edition.cnn.com
Cruise passengers board flights home amid outbreak
Cruise passengers board flights home amid outbreak       
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usatoday.com
Why is the press parroting Beijing and other commentary
Media critic: Why Is the Press Parroting Beijing? “US-based media companies and journalists” are “pushing Communist China’s propaganda and disinformation about COVID-19,” former GOP lawmaker Thaddeus G. McCotter charges at American Greatness. Could it be that, in addition to the usual ideological groupthink of the press, there is at work the same fear of losing...
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nypost.com
'Failure to launch': Lenders, small businesses criticize delays in coronavirus rescue program
The coronavirus crisis is putting added pressure ton small business, 29% of which prior were unprofitable and 47% had two weeks or less of cash.      
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usatoday.com
Local Digest: Anne Arundel County police officer arrested on child pornography charges
A roundup of news from the Washington region.
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washingtonpost.com
CDC Recommends Masks, But Trump Says He Won't Wear One Because He Meets 'Presidents, Prime Ministers, Dictators'
"I just don't want to wear one myself," Trump told reporters.
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newsweek.com
Supreme Court postpones more arguments amid coronavirus outbreak
Legal fights over Obamacare and presidential electors are delayed.
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politico.com
A Comprehensive Guide to What Kind of Mask You Should Wear and Why
Yes, you should donate N95s if you have them.
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slate.com
Pan-Roasted Honey Brioche
Pastry chef Dyan Ng of Auburn restaurant created this revolutionary bread technique: Brioche dough proofs like sourdough, then cooks on the stovetop.
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latimes.com
Face masks recommended, Trump says he won't wear
President Donald Trump says his administration is encouraging many Americans to wear face masks in public, though he stresses that the recommendation is optional and is conceding that he will not be complying with it. (April 3)       
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usatoday.com
Walmart To Limit Number Of People Shopping At One Time Because Of Coronavirus
Walmart and other retailers are counting visitors as one way to enforce social distancing and reduce the spread of the virus.
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npr.org
Dulles Toll Road shifts to electronic toll collecting only
Shift to electronic-only toll collections begins April 6.
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washingtonpost.com
Some red states hesitant to issue stay-at-home orders
The handful of states that have yet to issue stay-at-home orders have something in common: They're run by Republican governors and have significant rural populations.
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cbsnews.com
Trump bans US companies from exporting needed medical supplies
President Trump on Friday said that he had ordered US companies to stop exporting crucial medical supplies and equipment to ensure that hospitals and health care facilities have the life-saving supplies they need to battle the coronavirus pandemic. “I‘m signing a directive invoking the Defense Production Act to prohibit export of scarce health and medical...
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nypost.com
The Unsettled Mood on Liberty University’s Campus as COVID-19 Advances
"I really feel I'm being gaslit."
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slate.com
Coronavirus, Masks, Bill Withers: Your Friday Evening Briefing
Here’s what you need to know at the end of the day.
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nytimes.com
Calif. to aid small businesses impacted by virus
California is trying to aid small businesses affected by a statewide lockdown prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Small businesses will have a year to give the state up to $50,000 in sales taxes they collect from customers. (April 3)       
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usatoday.com
NYC police cleared to seize unused ventilators
NYC police cleared to seize unused ventilators       
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usatoday.com
Country stars Colbie Caillat, Justin Young of Gone West, split, end engagement after 10 years together
Colbie Caillat and Justin Young have called it quits.
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foxnews.com
Senator: Zoom Deceived Users Over Its Security Claims
Lawmakers and state attorneys general are scrutinizing the popular video conferencing company for potential violations, after users reported harassment and researchers uncovered security flaws.
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npr.org
Robert F. Kennedy's granddaughter and her young son go missing on Chesapeake Bay
A granddaughter of Robert F. Kennedy and her 8-year-old son are missing. Crews are searching Chesapeake Bay for 40-year-old Maeve Kennedy McKean and her son Gideon, who were last seen in a canoe. Natalie Brand reports from Washington.
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cbsnews.com
Trump Campaign Releases Edited Video of Biden Calling Coronavirus a Hoax After Dem Ads With Trump Making Similar Claim
The battle isn't just over coronavirus, it's about a Twitter policy that forbids videos, audio, and images that have been "deceptively altered or fabricated."
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newsweek.com
Bernie Sanders calls for $2G monthly payments, rent freeze in next stimulus package
Sen. Bernie Sanders is renewing his push for a $2,000 per month “emergency payment” for every American until the coronavirus outbreak “has passed.”
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foxnews.com
Female Athletes Say Competing Against Biological Males Is Unfair: ‘That’s Not Bigotry, That’s Science’
Women are leading the charge to put laws in place to protect female athletes from competing against biological male “transgender” competitors.
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breitbart.com
Face masks at Walgreens: Retailer is latest to give workers face covers amid COVID-19
Walgreens says it is providing face covers to its employees, the latest retailer to provide protections to workers against the spread of COVID-19.      
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usatoday.com
Looking for a freezer to store your coronavirus stockpile? You're not alone in being frozen out
As Americans stock up on food to get through the coronavirus lockdown, freezers have become one of the nation's most sought-after and scarce supplies.       
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usatoday.com
Unpacking the Most Memorable Fashion Statements From Netflix’s Tiger King
From the runway to ancient history, here's where we've seen looks like cowboy drag and live animals as accessories
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time.com
Outgoing CBS CEO Joe Ianniello Gets a $125M Parting Gift
Talk about a golden parachute. Former CBS Corp. Chief Executive Officer Joe Ianniello nabbed an eye-popping $125 million in total compensation and severance payments from ViacomCBS in 2019. Ianniello, who announced he was stepping down in January, was the head of CBS, which merged with sister company, Viacom last December, to form ViacomCBS. News of...
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nypost.com
The CDC now recommends everyone use cloth masks in public
A family wearing masks walks in downtown Los Angeles on March 22. | Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images There’s evidence that everyone should use masks in public. But there’s also a shortage of masks for health care workers. President Donald Trump said Friday the CDC is advising that every person in the US wear a cloth mask or face covering in public to combat the coronavirus pandemic. Masks should be worn “in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain,” such as grocery stores and pharmacies, the CDC guidance reads. Masks are especially recommended in areas where Covid-19 is spreading from person to person. The new guidance is a big shift for the federal government, which previously declined, through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and surgeon general, to recommend that most of the public wear a mask and only recommended them for those who are sick and people, such as health care workers, who frequently interact with the sick. The White House’s recommendation, based on new guidance from the CDC, only calls for people in public to use cloth masks, including homemade variants. The guidance is voluntary — and President Trump immediately added at a press conference Friday that he would not be complying: “You can do it. You don’t have to do it. I’m choosing not to do it.” The recommendation does not mean you should go out and buy a traditional medical mask. Since there’s a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks, for doctors and nurses, experts recommend that people don’t use the limited supply of medical masks, like surgical masks and N95 respirators, for themselves and instead leave those for health care workers. While the evidence is limited, the research suggests that more mask use by the greater public could help stop the spread of Covid-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Some studies in households and colleges “show a benefit of masks,” Raina MacIntyre, head of the Biosecurity Research Program at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, told me, “so it would be plausible that they would also protect in lower-intensity transmission settings such as in the general community.” The PPE shortage makes this evidence a bit harder to act on. If doctors and nurses can’t get medical masks, that’s very bad news for all of us: We need as many health care workers as possible to stay healthy so they can treat and save people who are sick, not just with Covid-19 but with other illnesses too. “I am worried that telling people to wear masks will strain already weak supplies that are needed by doctors and nurses,” Jennifer Nuzzo, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, previously told me, before the federal government’s updated guidance. “If we are able to fix that supply chain, I’d feel less worried about this. But some of the shortages initially were due to members of public and medical staff raiding medical offices’ and hospitals’ supplies for home use.” Experts also worry masks can give people an exaggerated sense of security. Masks don’t make you invincible, and they absolutely can’t replace good hygiene — Wash your hands! Don’t touch your face! — and social distancing. Even in Asian countries where widespread mask use is common, good hygiene and social distancing have been necessary to combat Covid-19. Epidemiological models also suggest coronavirus cases will rise if social distancing measures are relaxed, potentially causing hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of deaths in the US alone. Steve Pfost/Newsday via Getty Images Doctors from the North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, New York, collect boxes filled with donated masks on March 26. Still, masks do appear to help. It’s straightforward: Coronavirus appears to mostly spread when germ-containing droplets make it into a person’s mouth, nose, or eyes. If you have a physical barrier in front of your mouth and nose, that’s simply less likely to happen. But the best protection masks offer may be protection from the wearer. While the evidence is thin on how much masks protect the wearer from coronavirus — since it’s unclear if the virus spreads much through airborne droplets — it’s true that the masks stop people from spreading their own droplets: When you breathe, talk, laugh, sigh, yawn, sneeze, or cough in public, you’re less likely to get droplets on a checkout machine, dining table, or anywhere else if you have a mask on. That could stop people, even those who are asymptomatic, from spreading infection. That’s especially important for Covid-19, since at least some spread happens when people are asymptomatic, when they have few symptoms, or before they develop symptoms. Universal mask use could stop these asymptomatic carriers — many of whom might not even know they’re sick — from inadvertently infecting other people. The CDC guidance stated that masks are primarily meant to prevent the spread of disease from the wearer to others. Some members of the general public would also benefit more. People who know they’re sick or interacting with someone who’s sick were already advised to use a mask. People who frequently interact with others as part of their jobs, like a first responder or a grocery store clerk, are more likely to get good use out of masks too. The logic is similar to why masks are so important for health care workers: Masks are most useful during prolonged, close interactions involving potentially sick people. With the new guidance, the federal government is trying to walk a line between acknowledging the evidence for public mask use — as well as many people’s desires to take more action to combat the coronavirus — and avoiding further strain on available PPE supplies. So it’s limited its call to just cloth masks (which can be made at home) for now. But for every American, that means the official guidance is to now wear some sort of cloth on the face while in public. There’s some research in favor of everyone wearing masks Here’s the gist of the evidence on public mask use: Masks don’t offer full protection —but some protection is better than none. Masks can’t replace all the other approaches needed to fight the coronavirus, like washing your hands, not touching your face, and social distancing. But when paired with all these other tactics — and when used correctly, which may not be as easy as you think — masks offer an extra layer of protection. The quality of the research on this topic is weak, with a lot of small, underpowered studies. “There’s not this overwhelming body of evidence that says that’s exactly what we should be doing right now,” Saskia Popescu, an epidemiologist focused on hospital preparedness, told me. “That’s why there hasn’t been an earlier push from public health agencies.” But the studies that do exist generally favor more people wearing masks. A 2008 systematic review, published in BMJ, found medical masks halted the spread of respiratory viruses from likely infected patients. In particular, studies on the 2003 outbreak of SARS — a cousin to the coronavirus that causes Covid-19 — found that masks alone were 68 percent effective at preventing the virus. By comparison, washing hands more than 10 times a day was 55 percent effective. A combination of measures — hand-washing, masks, gloves, and gowns — was 91 percent effective. A 2015 review, also published in BMJ, looked at mask use among people in community settings, specifically households and colleges. Some studies produced unclear results, but the findings overall indicated that wearing a mask protected people from infections compared to not wearing a mask, especially when paired with hand-washing. A big issue was adherence; people were often bad at actually wearing masks, which, unsurprisingly, diminished their effectiveness. But if masks were used early and consistently, the authors concluded, they seemed to work. Other studies have produced similar results, typically finding at least some protective value from masks as long as they’re used consistently and properly. Getty Images People are seen wearing face masks in New York City on March 27. There are some risks. If people start feeling like masks make them invulnerable and begin acting recklessly — ignoring social distancing or failing to wash their hands — that could actually make wearing masks worse than not wearing them. But if people take all the other precautions and add masks to their repertoire, as other countries’ experiences suggest people can do, then masks seem to help. There’s no good research on how masks affect people’s behaviors. “It could be good. It could be bad,” Popescu said. “But either way, we need to have that knowledge.” There’s also a risk of improper use actually exposing people to more illness. If people don’t put on the masks correctly, they won’t be as protective (though some barrier is likely better than none). If people touch the front of their masks and then touch other parts of their face, they can infect themselves with droplets their mask caught. If people reuse masks, they can breathe in virus-containing droplets from the masks while putting them on or taking them off. The results also vary depending on the type of mask. One kind of mask that’s been talked about a lot lately is the N95 respirator, which is a more complex, expensive mask meant to fit more tightly on the face. N95 respirators in theory outperform surgical masks (which are the more traditional, looser-fitting medical masks), but they’re genuinely difficult to fit and use properly — to the point that a 2016 review in CMAJ couldn’t find a difference among health care workers using N95 respirators versus surgical masks for respiratory infection, likely due to poor fitting. Given how difficult these are to use, and the extra layer of protection they can provide, experts argue these masks should, above all, be saved for health care workers. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times A single-use N95 mask. Noam Galai/Getty Images People New York City wearing surgical masks for protection. Cloth masks, meanwhile, are much less effective than the modern alternatives, as a 2015 study in BMJ found. And they can be extra risky, since they can trap and hold virus-containing droplets that wearers can then breathe in. But they still, in general, offer more protection than no mask at all, several studies concluded. Experts also offered some advice for proper mask use: Wash your hands before and after taking off a mask — before to avoid getting anything on your face and mask, and after to get rid of anything that was on your mask. Don’t fidget with your mask while it’s on. If possible, throw away masks after using them. And if you can’t throw a mask away, make sure to thoroughly disinfect it with ultraviolet light sterilizers — not something most people have around — or, if using a cloth product, soap and water. Based on the evidence, masks appear to help both the wearer and other people. The latter is particularly important for the coronavirus, since the disease can spread from those with few to no symptoms. So whether it’s for selfish or altruistic reasons, there could be a benefit to everyone, even the asymptomatic, wearing masks — as is standard and recommended by public officials in many Asian countries (including Taiwan and South Korea, both of which have done a better job containing Covid-19 than the US). George Gao, director general of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, said as much in an interview with Science magazine: The big mistake in the US and Europe, in my opinion, is that people aren’t wearing masks. This virus is transmitted by droplets and close contact. Droplets play a very important role — you’ve got to wear a mask, because when you speak, there are always droplets coming out of your mouth. Many people have asymptomatic or presymptomatic infections. If they are wearing face masks, it can prevent droplets that carry the virus from escaping and infecting others. But part of persuading people to wear masks in these countries was simply more people wearing masks in public, removing the stigma that only sick people wear masks and making masks more socially acceptable. That’s an argument for everyone wearing a cloth mask now — and medical masks once supply shortages are fixed — when we go out. Not only could that help protect ourselves and those around us, it might help instill a healthier norm for the rest of society too. Masks aren’t a cure-all — and doctors and nurses need them more The federal government, particularly through the CDC, had for months rejected calls for the general public to wear masks. Before the government announced its updated guidance, I tried to find out why — and the CDC didn’t seem like it was budging on the issue anytime soon. Why shouldn’t the public use masks if they provide some protection? “CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19,” CDC spokesperson Arleen Porcell responded.Okay, but why? “The science says that surgical masks won’t stop the wearer from inhaling small airborne particles, which can cause infection. Nor do these masks form a snug seal around the face.” Sure, masks don’t stop everything, but isn’t some protection better than none? I got no response after that. Since then, however, the federal government has shifted course — now recommending at least a cloth mask for every American in public. That comes after the federal government’s messaging backfired: As health care workers have clamored for masks, it’s become harder to tell the public that masks wouldn’t benefit everyone else. By obfuscating and failing to fully explain the issue, experts told me, officials have likely sown distrust toward their guidance — and the public has rushed to buy masks anyway. I can’t explain the motives behind the federal government’s original stance and shift. But based on my conversations with other experts and officials, it seems many people are afraid of saying anything that could exacerbate the PPE shortage for health care workers or get members of the general public to think — incorrectly — that they could ease on social distancing if they just wear a mask. Ethan Miller/Getty Images University of Nevada medical students put on personal protective equipment as they get ready to conduct medical screenings in Las Vegas on March 28. “I fear that if we tell everyone they should go out and buy masks, it will not only contribute to the PPE shortage,” Jaimie Meyer, an infectious disease expert at Yale University, told me, “but it will give a false sense of a ‘quick fix’ for protection, whereas people still need to be practicing social distancing strategies that are much more effective, though perhaps socially, psychologically, [and] logistically challenging.” So as tough as social distancing can feel, it’s, unfortunately, a requirement for now that just won’t be supplanted by masks. The PPE shortage is a real problem too. There are reports of doctors, nurses, and other health care workers using bandanas and scarves for masks and trash bags for gowns. Hospitals are considering do-not-resuscitate orders for dying Covid-19 patients out of fear such intensive, close-up procedures could get doctors and nurses without PPE infected with the virus. The CDC, acknowledging the shortage, previously recommended homemade masks for health care workers when no other options are available. Different levels of government are racing to fix the PPE shortage, which is driven by both high demand as the coronavirus spreads and a lack of supply as countries, hospitals, and individuals hoard what they can find. Experts say the shortage reflects poor government preparedness for a pandemic, given that disease outbreak simulations repeatedly found PPE problems in the past. Whatever the cause, the shortage for health care workers is bad news for all of us. As coronavirus has spread, experts have talked up “flattening the curve.” The idea is to spread out the number of coronavirus cases — through social distancing, testing, contact tracing, and other protective measures — to avoid overwhelming the health care system. Here’s what that looks like in chart form: Christina Animashaun/Vox The PPE shortage could make it harder to flatten the curve of new cases if doctors and nurses get sick. But the line representing health care system capacity also isn’t a constant. If we develop more capacity, it can handle more cases at once. If capacity falls — if doctors and nurses get sick because of a lack of protective equipment, or refuse to work without conditions that can ensure their safety — even a flatter curve will be hard for the system to handle. That’s why experts, even those who acknowledge that the public would benefit from using masks, say that doctors and nurses should get priority: This isn’t just about keeping people on the front lines safe; it’s about keeping all of us safe. So until the shortage is fixed, experts say that people should not compete with our health care workers for mask supplies. If you do have masks, consider donating them to hospitals and clinics (though note that most will only accept unopened packages). There’s also a new group, Project N95, trying to connect PPE suppliers and health care workers. EuropaNewswire/Gado/Getty Images New York Mayor Bill de Blasio picks up a donation of 250,000 surgical masks from the United Nations headquarters on March 28. Policymakers could also take steps to fix the shortage: sending out strategic reserves, funding more production, and, in President Donald Trump’s case, using the Defense Production Act to better prioritize PPE for hard-hit states in the short term and mandating more production in the medium and long term. And individual companies could shift their production lines to produce more PPE, like some clothing and pillow companies are doing. For now, the federal government recommends cloth masks for the general public, echoing what other organizations had previously suggested. A “road map” on dealing with coronavirus by the conservative-leaning American Enterprise Institute, for instance, made a similar recommendation: “Personal protective equipment should continue to be reserved for health care workers until supplies are sufficient for them and abundant. For this reason, right now members of the general public should opt to wear nonmedical fabric face masks when going out in public.” Again, the research suggests cloth masks aren’t as effective as medical masks, but they offer some protection. If you want to make your own, people are increasingly offering their own tips on how to do so on social media.
1m
vox.com
2020 Daily Trail Markers: Battling the opioid crisis amid coronavirus
The opioid epidemic and the coronavirus pandemic "have unfortunately crossed paths in a very lethal way," said a nonprofit president who works with recovery patients.
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cbsnews.com
Christine Ebersole’s ‘Bob Hearts Abishola’ character hits home
After treading the boards in live theater and the concert stage for 45 years, Christine Ebersole was ready for a change of address. So, when Chuck Lorre asked to her to co-star in his new CBS comedy “Bob Hearts Abishola,” she left the Great White Way behind. “I’m living on network TV Easy Street,” the...
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nypost.com
FISA court orders FBI to review if wiretaps are invalid after errors found during investigation
The directive comes just days after an internal Justice Department review found new problems with the FBI's management of wiretap applications.        
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usatoday.com
Why we need to lean on Bill Withers and his great music more than ever
It seems like Bill Withers has been in my ear my entire life. Growing up in a household where ‘70s soul was the soundtrack of our lives, he was right up there with Marvin, Stevie, Diana, Chaka, Teddy P. and other R&B legends — the artists who made me fall in love with music while...
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nypost.com
President Trump and Surgeon General explain new guidance on wearing face masks
President Trump announced that the CDC is changing its guidelines to recommend people wear simple cotton face masks to protect against the coronavirus, though he said he didn't plan to do so himself. Surgeon General Jerome Adams joined him at the White House briefing to explain the changing guidance on face masks.
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cbsnews.com
Removing the USS Theodore Roosevelt captain was reckless and foolish
John Kirby writes that when Thomas Modly, acting secretary of the Navy, removed Capt. Brett Crozier of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, it was unwarranted, reckless in its timing and petty in appearances. And Modly's decision could have a chilling effect on other commanding officers in similar circumstances.
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edition.cnn.com
Sheriff seeking new leads in Carole Baskin case says events were ‘suspicious’
We hear from the Sheriff looking into Carol Baskin's missing millionaire husband.
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nypost.com
13 Celebrities Putting Their Money Where Their Mouths Are During Coronavirus
As the Chinese coronavirus continues to crush Americans and cause a massive health crisis, putting pressure on the country's health care system, several Hollywood celebrities are donating large amounts of money to causes dedicated to helping those in need.
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breitbart.com
Selena Gomez reveals she’s bipolar in chat with Miley Cyrus on Instagram Live: ‘I’ve seen it in my own family’
Selena Gomez just dropped a huge revelation on the status of her mental health during a time where many of her fans probably could use the insight while hunkering down and waiting out the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie donates $1M to fight coronavirus
Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie is donating $1 million to kick off a coronavirus research fund at a medical school in the city.
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foxnews.com
Donald Trump Announces CDC Recommendation for Americans to Wear Cloth Masks in Public
Trump said Friday that the Centers for Disease Control had decided to recommend Americans wear cloth masks in public. "This is voluntary," he said. "I don't think I'm going to be doing it."
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breitbart.com
15 resources for cash-strapped artists hit by coronavirus cuts and closures
With theaters closed, galleries shut and concerts canceled, the arts community is rallying to help its own. Here are places providing financial support.
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latimes.com