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Clearing the Path to Vaccinating the World
Manufacturers say rich countries will soon have more Covid-19 vaccines than they need. There’s no longer any excuse for failing to help the rest.
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Powering the picket line: Workers are turning to tech in their labor battles
Employee activists are using digital tools like Facebook, Twitter, Signal, and Zoom to fuel solidarity.
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Republicans Are Winning the Debate on Voter ID
Biden’s blunders in Georgia set the tone of the national discussion, while Democrats’ accusations about a “new Jim Crow” have failed to inflict any political damage. 
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How to get a low down-payment mortgage
Many people believe you need a 20 percent down payment to buy a house. While that amount is preferable, there are many programs offering financial assistance to first-time buyers and mortgages requiring as little as 3 percent down.
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The 60/40 Portfolio Isn’t Dead, Just More Expensive
Split your investments any way you like, just be ready to pay a lot more to find safety in this market.
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How Erdogan’s Unorthodox Views Rattle Turkish Markets
Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan doesn’t like it when the country’s banks charge people relatively heavily to borrow money. That alone doesn’t make him unusual for a politician, given that cheap money can garner electoral support. What makes Erdogan extraordinary is his unorthodox argument for low interest rates and his determination to bring them about by wresting control of monetary policy from theoretically independent central bankers.
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Should condo board charge all owners for electric-car charging station or just the ones who use it?
REAL ESTATE MATTERS | Where the charging station is available for any homeowner to use, we view it as another amenity offered by that building, one that will ultimately make the property more desirable to future buyers (and may even help propel values higher).
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How to Cut Emissions Faster? Make It Count in CEO Pay
The quest to de-carbonize the global economy shouldn’t be all talk. Executive pay and incentives should include climate metrics.
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Rishi Sunak Is Playing a Risky Game With Boris Johnson
Can the ambitious U.K. finance minister maintain fiscal prudence while keeping the prime minister happy?
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Draghi, the New Face of Europe? Not so Fast
Italy’s technocrat prime minister has inspired change and reform but he may not yet be the right fit for an EU seeking its place in the world.
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Hedge Funds Need a New M&A Playbook in Germany
Bidders are settling for less control over German takeover targets to prevent deals from getting derailed. The result is an unwelcome fudge.
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China’s Slowdown Pricks the Inflation Narrative
Anyone worried about surging price increases should consider the latest numbers from Beijing.
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Kominers’s Conundrums: All Hail the Newest ‘Jeopardy’ Star
Matt Amodio covered a lot of ground in his record-breaking run. Can you keep up?
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China’s power shortages, housing struggles put brakes on the economy
The country’s growth was weighed down in the third quarter, hitting the slowest rate in a year.
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Once Again, the Most Important Supreme Court Term Ever
“Momentous” has been used repeatedly for more than a century to describe each new session as justices weigh issues that resonate in their time.
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Why Neil deGrasse Tyson Thinks Science Is True
The astrophysicist explains how a single study isn’t the same thing as a scientific fact.
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Iowa’s Water Crisis Offers a Glimpse of the Future
A combination of extreme weather and surging pollution has led local officials to consider drastic measures.
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Millennials Pull Crypto Out of the Shadows in India
Not long ago there was a ban on banks dealing with virtual currencies. Now the industry itself wants to be regulated and is harnessing the power of Bollywood superstars to lift its profile.
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Strikes are sweeping the labor market as workers wield new leverage
The labor activism runs the gamut of American industry, fueled by the same grievances about pay, benefits and quality of life behind the Great Resignation.
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The Global Energy Drought May Herald a Future of Excess
In producing electricity, a buffer of waste is a good thing. In the renewable era, we’ll need that more than ever.
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China’s Warning to Evergrande Was Aimed at Fantasia, Too
The central bank wants to prevent what mainland bond investors call “eloping:” indebted companies refusing to pay up.
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Boris Johnson’s Believers Ignore the U.K.’s Mounting Problems
Supporters feel the prime minister is strong, honest, warm, funny and gives foreigners a bad time. Only the last of these propositions is objectively true.
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Don’t Expect OPEC to Keep You Warm This Winter
The oil producer group will remain cautious about boosting supply, fearing surpluses next year.
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Hollywood union reaches deal with producers to avoid nationwide strike
Workers had raised issues with low pay from streaming services and work bleeding over into their evenings and weekends.
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Massive update and paid DLC coming to ‘Animal Crossing: New Horizons’
A new update will bring a lot of a new content to the game after a dry spell.
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Netflix fires employee for sharing information about Dave Chappelle’s special amid LGBTQ backlash
Netflix said the employee leaked “confidential” and “commercially sensitive” information following backlash from the LGBTQ community over recent jokes from Chappelle that critics have called transphobic,
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