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Myanmar to release 5,600 anti-regime prisoners
The move comes days after a regional bloc of nations snubbed the country's ruling junta, disinviting coup leader Min Aung Hlaing from an upcoming summit.
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Colin Powell, the former secretary of state, dies at 84
Powell's family said that he died Monday of complications from COVID-19, despite being fully vaccinated. Powell served as secretary of state under George W. Bush.
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What you need to know about the trial set to begin in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery
Three white men are accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a Black man shot and killed as he was jogging down a residential street after being chased by pickup trucks. Jury selection begins Monday.
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What's at stake as Biden decides whether to stick with Jerome Powell as Fed chief
President Biden has a big decision to make: Whether to reappoint Jerome Powell to a second term as Federal Reserve chairman or choose someone else for one of the world's most powerful economic jobs.
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LA County wants Vanessa Bryant to get a psych exam before her lawsuit goes to trial
Vanessa Bryant and others who lost family members in the January 2020 helicopter crash that killed Kobe Bryant sued Los Angeles County over leaked photos of the crash scene that were allegedly shared.
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China's economic growth weakens amid construction slowdown
The world's second-largest economy grew by a weaker-than-expected 4.9% over a year ago in the three months ending in September, down from the previous quarter's 7.9%, government data showed on Monday.
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Megan Rice, peace activist nun imprisoned for nuclear site break-in, dies at 91
Megan Rice spent two years in federal prison while in her 80s after breaking into a government security complex to protest nuclear weapons.
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Tom Morey, inventor of the Boogie Board, dies at 86
Morey, a well-known surfer in Southern California in the '50s and '60s, invented the Boogie Board in 1971 in Hawaii. Morey's invention remains a popular choice for those wanting to ride some waves.
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Coast Guard says a ship's anchor dragged California oil pipeline that later leaked
Investigators believe a 1,200-foot cargo ship dragging anchor in rough seas caught an underwater oil pipeline and pulled it across the seafloor, months before a leak from the line.
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Protester shot by Kyle Rittenhouse in Kenosha is now suing Wisconsin authorities
The lawsuit alleges that authorities in Kenosha not only knew that armed vigilantes planned to patrol the protest attended by Black Lives Matter supporters, but also encouraged their participation.
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Former President Bill Clinton released from the hospital
Clinton, 75, had been hospitalized at the UC Irvine Medical Center since Tuesday for a "non-COVID-related infection."
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It's been 42 years since 'The Hitchhiker's Guide' answered the ultimate question
The first Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy book was published in October 1979. Fans are looking back at how the series has endured in popularity and why it's still relevant.
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The political fight over vaccine mandates deepens despite their effectiveness
Republicans in Texas and Florida are combatting COVID-19 mandates as a matter of personal liberty, even as the data show just how crucial vaccination — and mandates — are to beating the virus.
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Kentucky's backroad churches may be key to saving hospitals overwhelmed by COVID
Public health workers are going church to church and house to house in the state's secluded valleys to dispel COVID myths, ease isolation, bring aid, and convince wary residents to get vaccinated.
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Georgia murder trial in killing of Ahmaud Arbery seen as test case for racial justice
Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man, was shot and killed as he jogged through a neighborhood near Brunswick, Ga. in 2020. Three white men in pick-up trucks pursued him and then confronted him.
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Venezuela halts talks after Maduro ally's extradition to U.S.
Alex Saab's extradition and the subsequent jailing of six American oil executives in Venezuela are a sign that relations between Washington and Caracas could be upended.
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Hollywood crew members reach a tentative deal with major studios, averting a strike
After months of negotiation and a strike on the horizon, Hollywood crew members in the union IATSE have agreed to a deal with the major studios.
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Joe Manchin's objections to a clean energy program threaten Biden's climate promises
The key climate element of President Biden's $3.5 trillion budget proposal appears to be in jeopardy, threatening environmental goals and global credibility.
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At a memorial ceremony for officers, Biden renews calls for police reform
Speaking at the a memorial service for fallen law enforcement officers, the president acknowledged the pain that accompanies losing a loved one. He also pushed again for police reform.
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Self-driving Waymo cars gather in a San Francisco neighborhood, confusing residents
The cars have been converging at all hours of the day and night, mystifying neighbors. Invasion of the self-driving cars? Not quite.
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A new crew docks at China's first permanent space station
The three astronauts began their six-month mission on China's first permanent space station. The crew includes Wang Yaping, who is expected to become China's first female spacewalker.
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1 deputy was killed and 2 were wounded in an ambush at a Houston bar
The constable deputies were shot while working an extra shift at the bar, officials said. Authorities took a person into custody but were searching for a man believed to be the shooter.
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U.S. will provide condolence payments to families of Kabul drone strike victims
The Aug. 29 U.S. drone strike was supposed to target ISIS-K members, but the attack killed 10 Afghan civilians. Now those victims' families will get unspecified condolence payments.
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