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Utah State's Peasley throws for 3 TDs, runs for another
Andrew Peasley passed for 239 yards and three touchdowns and rushed for 118 yards and another score, and Utah State used four third-quarter touchdowns to beat New Mexico 41-27 on Thursday night in a battle of winless teams.
foxnews.com
PS5 Console Listed on eBay for $9,500 As Retailer Warns Against Scams
There are dozens of PS5 consoles listed on the website for thousands of dollars more than the original price of $499.
newsweek.com
5 things to know for November 27: Covid-19, Flynn, election, Turkey, Venezuela
Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.
edition.cnn.com
Dallas Cowboys Are on Their Worst Streak for Points Allowed in Franchise History
Following their 41-16 shellacking at the hands of the Washington Football Team, the Cowboys have allowed 20 or more points in 11 consecutive games.
newsweek.com
Colorado-USC canceled by COVID cases; Buffs book SDSU
No. 19 Southern California’s scheduled home game Saturday against unbeaten Colorado has been canceled due to positive COVID-19 tests for the Trojans.
foxnews.com
Health Care Worker Fired After Elderly Woman With Dementia Found Dead In Freezer
Sofiya Perel, 86, was found dead several hours after staff called 911 to say she had gone missing from a nursing home in Trotwood, Ohio.
newsweek.com
Courteney Cox's Thanksgiving Turkey Dance Viewed More Than 2 Million Times
Courteney Cox sent legions of "Friends" fans into a frenzy this Thanksgiving by recreating her iconic turkey head dance.
newsweek.com
'He made a lot of people around here better men': Cowboys mourn death of strength coach Markus Paul
A day after the passing of their strength and conditioning coordinator Markus Paul, the Dallas Cowboys remembered the impact he made on the team.        
usatoday.com
Trump 2024? It could happen
Michael D'Antonio writes that smart money would bet that Trump will at least gesture toward 2024 sometime soon. The reasons for this, beyond the poll numbers, must include the frame of mind reflected in his refusal to concede his 2020 defeat and his devotion to the wild notion that he was somehow cheated out of a second term.
edition.cnn.com
Trump Telling Reporter 'Don't Ever Talk to the President That Way' Watched 8 Million Times
The president hit out at the reporter after he tried to interrupt an answer to an earlier question.
newsweek.com
Another wonder goal scored in the Europa League
edition.cnn.com
Parents accused of having heroin, loaded guns
edition.cnn.com
Op-Ed: To stamp out Trumpism, the U.S. needs to deal with these six things
To purge Trumpism, the president's abuses must be reckoned with — not as retribution, but to deter recurrence.
latimes.com
How to watch U.S. women's national soccer team vs. the Netherlands: TV channel, live stream, start time, USWNT roster
For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic shut down sports, the USWNT will play a game, as it takes on the Netherlands on Friday.        
usatoday.com
Live Updates From a Black Friday Like No Other
The dominant will thrive in this year’s holiday shopping. Everyone else will just hang on. Here’s the latest.
nytimes.com
Obama’s raw recollections on race in ‘A Promised Land’
The nation's first Black president delivers unsparing observations and honest assessments of race in America and on his administration.
washingtonpost.com
Black Friday is here — and it’s completely different
Holiday sales began weeks ago, and many shoppers say they’re shunning stores this year in favor of buying online.
washingtonpost.com
Letters to the Editor: This will end badly for Trump. Just ask Joseph McCarthy
Joseph McCarthy and Donald Trump were advised by Roy Cohn. Both gained power, and now Trump appears headed for the same fate as McCarthy.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: We need a full-blown lockdown, not just an outdoor dining ban
This time, let's do a shutdown right: no trips to stores, takeout food only, and picking up groceries. Then, we can control the pandemic.
latimes.com
Editorial: The voters have spoken on legalizing marijuana. Biden and Congress need to listen
The Biden administration and Congress need to modernize the federal law on marijuana to reflect the reality on the ground.
latimes.com
After 20 seasons with one team, Tom Brady is still finding his footing with Tampa Bay
Tom Brady went to the Bucs to win the Super Bowl, but it’s taking him a while to adjust to his new home.
washingtonpost.com
Letters to the Editor: Left and right don't share the same facts. How is civil discourse possible?
If two political commentators for the L.A. Times cannot find areas of common ground, how can the rest of us?
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: It's time to standardize food expiration dates. How about 'discard by'?
"Recommended use by," "best by" and other ways to say you should not eat food by a certain date are confusing.
latimes.com
Steve Doocy: A delicious day-after-Thanksgiving recipe -- try our 'leftover turkey galette'
This is a joyous recipe because it marks the end of the leftovers! 
foxnews.com
Column: Trump's non-concession concession, in literary terms
Emily the Scrivener gave in. And Ozymandias Trump is in ruins along with his presidency.
latimes.com
How government incentives shaped the nursing home business — and left it vulnerable to a pandemic
Federal money, through the Medicare and Medicaid systems, has long shaped the nursing home business — and in ways that left it completely unprepared when the viral pandemic arrived in March.
washingtonpost.com
Editorial: In this time of COVID, let's transform Black Friday into something meaningful
Let's lighten a dark period by doing the lion's share of our shopping in small local stores and by channeling our busy holiday doings into gifts for others.
latimes.com
What Does Black Friday Mean? Origin, History and Why It Starts the Shopping Season
Despite resistance from retailers, the name has been used to describe the start to the holiday shopping season for nearly 60 years.
newsweek.com
Spoiling Happiest Season, a Charming—and Queer—Christmas Rom-Com
Will a mayoral campaign—and homophobia--mean Abby and Harper’s relationship doesn’t make it through the holiday season?
slate.com
What Are the Rules for Sleepovers When Your Teen Is Bisexual?
Parenting advice on bisexual sleepover rules, puberty guidance, and standardized testing.
slate.com
America Failed at COVID-19, but the Economy’s Okay. Why?
Here is a remarkable, underappreciated fact: The U.S. economy has performed far better than that of many of the country’s peers during this horrible year. The International Monetary Fund expects the U.S. economy to contract by 4.4 percent in 2020, versus 5.3 percent in Japan, 6 percent in Germany, 7.1 percent in Canada, and nearly 10 percent in both the United Kingdom and France.This fact is not a result of the United States managing its public-health response better than those countries, allowing it to reopen from lockdown sooner and for consumption to roar back. Indeed, many of those peer nations have had significantly better outcomes, as measured by COVID-19 caseloads, hospitalizations, and death rates. Nor is it a result of the U.S. preserving more jobs. The unemployment rate here is far higher here than it is in Japan, Germany, or the U.K.America owes its macroeconomic good fortune to Washington muscling through a giant and successful stimulus in the spring—a policy victory that Congress and the outgoing Trump administration are doing their best to cram into the jaws of defeat.[Annie Lowrey: Why the Trump administration doesn’t want to help]The United States came into the coronavirus recession with a few structural advantages, including a highly diversified economy. Countries dependent on a single hard-hit industry—Spain on tourism, for instance—have tended to falter regardless of their health or macroeconomic response. The U.S. is also lucky not to have to rely on exports for growth. World Bank data show that sales abroad account for 12 percent of our gross domestic product, compared with 18 percent in Japan, 32 percent in Canada, and 47 percent in Germany. This means that the collapse in global trade during the pandemic has hit other countries far harder than the U.S.Another structural advantage is that Washington prints the world’s reserve currency, which means that it tends to suck in global capital flows when uncertainty is high, “as in a pandemic,” Mark Zandi of Moody’s Analytics told me. That pushes up American asset values and lowers American borrowing costs. The U.S. labor market is also more flexible than those in other countries, Zandi noted. “Americans are more willing to adopt new technologies, to move for a job, and [to] make big changes in how they live and work.” That makes absorbing big, strange shocks easier.The United States has been better not just in form but also in function, with regard to combating the economic fallout of the pandemic. It has had best-of-class monetary policy: This spring, the Federal Reserve, the country’s most capable technocratic institution, calmed the financial markets with an alphabet soup of special programs while dropping interest rates to zero and flooding the markets with cash.Yet Washington, improbably, has truly distinguished itself with fiscal policy, at least earlier in the year. The U.S. has fewer, stingier, more complicated, and more conditional safety nets available to people than many other advanced economies—less generous “automatic stabilizers,” in economic parlance. But when COVID-19 hit, congressional Democrats negotiated a series of enormous, highly effective temporary stabilizers with Republicans who were ready to go big, among them Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. In the $2.2 trillion CARES Act, Congress provided forgivable loans to small businesses; sent $1,200 checks to most Americans; added gig workers to the unemployment-insurance system; and put a $600 weekly top-up on unemployment checks.“We’d never seen such a rapid and massive amount of stimulus being doled out by Congress, ever,” Gregory Daco, an economist at the international forecasting firm Oxford Economics, told me. “Contrast it with what happened in the global financial crisis” that precipitated the Great Recession in 2007. “It took three times longer to get a stimulus package half the size.” Indeed, the U.S. provided fiscal support equivalent to roughly 12 percent of its GDP, data from Moody’s Analytics show, one-third more than Germany and twice as much as the U.K. Other than Australia, no large, wealthy country did more to support its economy.The investment paid off. The U.S. increased millions of low-income families’ earnings over the spring and summer, and increased the amount of money in American pockets overall. This meant that while the economy experienced a sharp, miserable contraction, as businesses closed down, trade halted, and fear took over, it has bounced back better than many of its peers. The U.K., Germany, Canada, and France are all doing worse—in some cases far worse—in terms of output.[Annie Lowrey: The pandemic proved that cash payments worked]Still, the U.S. is not exactly the North Star leading the world out of the death, destruction, and devastation of 2020. Some peer countries did better in macroeconomic terms—countries that did not bungle their public-health responses and managed to add good amounts of stimulus as necessary, too. Australia, South Korea, and Taiwan have saved lives, jobs, and output, all together.Moreover, Washington shored up output without shoring up employment, a queasy policy legacy for the 10 million Americans who had jobs a year ago and do not today. The Paycheck Protection Program created in the CARES Act did help many small businesses keep employees on their books in the early days of the pandemic. But many small firms are ailing now; the hospitality industry has been decimated; and state and local governments are shedding workers. Other countries elected to directly subsidize employment, paying businesses to keep workers on the books, though often at lower pay.America’s strong GDP number also masks the brutal inequality of the recession. Young workers and low-wage workers have been hit particularly hard, meaning that the people least capable of bearing any financial pain are being asked to bear the majority of it, especially since the initial federal unemployment-insurance bonus ended. The decision in many states to not open public schools for in-person instruction has also hurt parents, especially women, hundreds of thousands of whom have dropped out of the labor force to supervise their children’s online learning. “Working mothers and single mothers are having a miserable time in this recovery,” Michelle Holder, an economist at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York, told me. She also noted that the recession has amplified deep racial disparities, with a large share of Black and Latino workers losing jobs and many leaving the labor force entirely.The United States’ relative GDP success might not last much longer, either. The country is facing not just a slowing recovery but also a potential reversal. Eviction moratoria and student-loan-payment deferrals end on December 31. The Federal Reserve is in a public spat with the Treasury Department, which is trying to end and reclaim the financing for some of the Fed’s special-support programs. The financial benefits from the $1,200 in helicopter money and the additional $600 in unemployment checks are fading too. Credit-card and debit-card usage is decreasing. Restaurant reservations are down. Measures of consumer mobility, like surveys of miles driven and flights taken, are dropping. Layoffs are increasing, and unemployment-insurance claims are stuck above 1 million a week.[Derek Thompson: The workforce is about to change dramatically]The situation is made yet more dangerous by the intensification of the pandemic. “We’re in a scary exponential phase of the virus,” Daco told me. “That means higher hospitalizations, more deaths, more restrictions on activity, more fear, and therefore less consumer spending, less business investment, and a slowdown in economic activity.” Any advantages the U.S. had are dwindling. “We’re looking at a double-dip recession and deep scarring” if Congress does nothing, says Diane Swonk, the chief economist at Grant Thornton, an accounting and advisory firm.The U.S. is still winning the global recovery, at least in GDP terms. But Congress seems uninterested in repeating its springtime success. Republicans are negotiating for an insufficient stimulus, with Democrats holding out for a bigger one that might never materialize. And not even the widespread deployment of a vaccine in 2021 will make workers whole again.
theatlantic.com
Democrats’ Shaky Future in the House
Joe Biden marked an unexpected and unwanted milestone this month when he won a clear popular-vote majority in the presidential election but saw his party suffer substantial losses in the House of Representatives.That unusual combination of results—the first time it’s happened in more than 120 years—crystallizes the core challenge Democrats face in translating their consistent victories in the popular vote into congressional power. In geographic terms, their coalition is deep but narrow. The party has consolidated its hold on the nation’s largest metropolitan centers, which allows it to amass substantial popular-vote victories, but it has systematically declined in the smaller places beyond them—a dynamic that’s intensified during Donald Trump’s polarizing presidency.The distortions created by this geographic sorting have been most apparent in the Senate. There, the GOP’s dominance of less populated, heavily rural states has allowed it to control the upper chamber more than half of the time since 1980, even though Republicans have represented a majority of the nation’s population for only one two-year span during that period. Democratic senators are guaranteed again to represent a majority of the nation’s population next year, whether or not the party wins the two Georgia runoff elections in January, which would allow it to control the chamber.While Democrats will still run the House, Republicans’ unanticipated gains there underscore how the growing concentration of the Democrats’ political support into a few large places threatens their position in that chamber as well. With three House seats still to be decided (one each in California, Iowa, and New York), Republicans have substantially narrowed the majority that the Democrats amassed in their 2018 sweep. So far, Democrats will control 222 House seats and Republicans 210; immediately before the election, the balance was 232 Democrats to 197 Republicans, with one libertarian and five vacancies.These results closely follow the outcome of the presidential race. While Biden is on track to win the popular vote by well over 6 million, the best estimates are that he may carry only about 223 House districts. With very few districts backing a presidential candidate of one party and a House candidate of the other, that left Democrats with very little margin for error in their search for 218 seats.[Read: The Democratic truce is over]It’s unusual for a president’s or president-elect’s party to lose House seats while he wins, but it’s hardly unprecedented. Based on official House statistics, Woodrow Wilson, John F. Kennedy, Bill Clinton, and Grover Cleveland (twice) won elections while losing ground in the House. But each of those Democratic presidents won with less than half of the popular vote, well below the 51 percent Biden has captured at last count. Republicans Ulysses S. Grant and William Howard Taft won a majority of the presidential popular vote but lost a handful of House seats (two and four, respectively). The most recent president to win a majority of the popular vote and lose a substantial number of House seats was Republican William McKinley in 1896. (His 48-seat loss came after a landslide two years earlier in which the GOP won nearly three-fourths of the House.)The juxtaposition between Biden’s substantial popular-vote win and the GOP’s substantial House gains captures the geographic sorting that is reshaping American politics. Growing advantages in the biggest places are the key reason Democrats have now won the popular vote in seven of the past eight presidential elections, something no party had done since the formation of the modern party system in 1828. Based on the latest data, Biden won fully 91 of the nation’s 100 largest counties. That’s more than the 87 Hillary Clinton carried in 2016, and far beyond the 69 that Bill Clinton took in 1992.But even as Democrats have improved their position inside the nation’s largest and most economically vibrant metropolitan areas, their support in exurban, small-town, and rural regions has collapsed. While Bill Clinton twice won about 1,500 counties (roughly half the counties in America), Hillary Clinton carried just less than 500 (roughly one-sixth). Though Biden won the popular vote by at least 3 million more votes than she did, he only slightly expanded her geographic reach: So far, he’s carried 509 counties, based on the latest count from the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program.When measured in House districts, the performance of Democratic presidential candidates has similarly narrowed. According to data collected in Brookings’s Vital Statistics on Congress, Bill Clinton carried a clear majority of House districts in his two victories, while winning only a plurality of the popular vote in both three-way races. But Al Gore lost most House districts while winning the popular vote in 2000. And both Barack Obama in 2012 and Hillary Clinton in 2016 lost most House districts while winning the popular vote (2008 was an exception to this pattern: Obama won 242 House districts while winning almost 53 percent of the popular vote).In one sense, Biden’s success in winning more districts (about 223) than Obama in 2012 (209) and Hillary Clinton in 2016 (205) constitutes clear progress for Democrats, reflecting the expansion of the party’s support in white-collar suburbs. But it still highlights the constraints on the Democrats’ reach: Trump won more House seats (230) in 2016 while losing the popular vote, and George W. Bush in 2004 won many more (256) while winning slightly less of the national vote than Biden did this year.Those disparities explain why many analysts in both parties believe Democrats face a natural disadvantage in the House, even before factoring in gerrymandering.“If you apportion the House in a fair drawing, it favors Republicans, because Democrats live in these urban enclaves that are 80 percent [Democratic] and they waste a lot of votes,” Tom Davis, a former Republican representative from Northern Virginia who chaired the National Republican Congressional Committee, told me.The consequences of this imbalance are growing more significant because, as in Senate races, it’s getting harder for either party to win House seats in areas that vote the other way at the presidential level—especially in a presidential-election year.Through the late 20th century, it was common for a large number of districts to support House candidates from one party and presidential nominees from the other. About 190 districts split their votes during landslides for Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan, largely because many conservative southerners still voted Democratic for the House even as they backed those GOP presidential candidates.But as more voters have treated congressional elections as choices between competing parties rather than competing individuals, the number of split districts has dwindled, reaching a modern low of 26 in the 2012 election and rebounding only slightly to 35 in 2016.This year could set a new record for the fewest split-ticket House seats. Depending on the final vote tallies, it’s possible that each party will win only about 10 seats that voted for the other side’s presidential candidate. Democrats have reelected 10 members in seats that voted for Trump (though Biden may win some of those districts as the final votes are counted, removing them from the split-ticket category). Republicans in turn reelected three GOP incumbents in seats that Biden carried, beat four Democratic incumbents in Biden districts, and won one open seat that he took.[Read: A rising Republican’s bet on a losing president]Even so, the bulk of the Democrats’ House losses came in districts that Trump carried in both 2016 and 2020; the party has lost eight such seats already, with two still undecided. Democrats expected to lose some of those districts with Trump himself on the ballot. But they were surprised—and disappointed—by two trends.One was the victories by Republican House candidates in several urban and suburban districts that Biden carried, including seats around Miami; Omaha, Nebraska; Dallas; Philadelphia; and Orange County, California. The clear implication of those results is that some college-educated, suburban voters who rejected Trump supported Republicans for the House, perhaps because they did not want to give Democrats a free hand to advance their agenda. (The share of college graduates exceeds the national average in almost all of the Biden districts that elected Republicans to the House.) “We have voters who didn’t want to vote for Trump but wanted to be able to support the kind of Republican House candidates who they traditionally supported,” Molly Reynolds, a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution, told me.The second disappointment for Democrats is that Biden did not win more Republican-held suburban seats that voted for Trump last time. Biden did win three Republican-held seats that Democrats captured this election (two redrawn districts in North Carolina and a suburban Atlanta seat); he also flipped about 10 seats that Trump won in 2016, and that House Democrats took in their 2018 sweep. But Biden fell short in many of the party’s new targets for 2020, including suburban Republican-held districts around St. Louis; Cincinnati; Indianapolis; Phoenix, Arizona; Austin, Texas; and Houston. Those were also places where Democrats expected to offset any losses in the Trump districts they won in 2018. But against the headwind of Trump’s continuing strength in these new targets, Democrats could not capture any of them in the House contests. “Trump was sneaky strong—not enough to win, but he was not the albatross that we expected him to be” for down-ballot Republicans, the GOP communications consultant Liam Donovan told me.In one sense, those seats were always tough targets for Democrats: They are almost all much more Republican in their core political DNA than the Trump districts the party won in 2018 House races. But the inability of either Biden or Democratic House candidates to capture them reinforces the party’s worry that Democrats can’t hold very much more than 218 House seats on a lasting basis. The most traditionally Republican-leaning suburbs still resist them (particularly in Midwest states, where those suburbs remain predominantly white). Meanwhile, the GOP’s red curtain over rural America looks almost impenetrable at this point.Adding to the Democratic challenge, Republicans this month maintained control of legislatures in states such as Texas, Florida, North Carolina, and Georgia, which will give the GOP the upper hand in the redrawing of congressional-district maps next year, following the 2020 census. The Democratic position in the competition for the House is still stronger than it was during the redistricting process 10 years ago, though. The party’s advances in white-collar suburbs, particularly around Sun Belt cities such as Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, and Phoenix, means it is now competing on a wider House battlefield than it was then. But in states where Republicans control redistricting—and they will control the redistricting of more congressional seats than Democrats—the GOP may be able to draw Republican-leaning seats that submerge those newly blue suburban areas into immense tracts of red rural terrain.For Democrats, the surest way to defend their House majority may be to rebuild their capacity to compete in at least a few more small-town and rural districts. That proved impossible with Trump polarizing the electorate so sharply along cultural lines. The future of the House Democratic majority may depend on whether Biden succeeds in his uphill quest to lower the temperature of partisan conflict and narrow the nation’s gaping political divides.
theatlantic.com
Virginia’s new redistricting commission prepares to take applications from the public
Approved in Nov. 3 elections, new panel gets underway with job of drawing political maps for 2021 races.
washingtonpost.com
'The Mandalorian': Who is Ahsoka Tano in Chapter 13?
"The Mandalorian" fans have been waiting all season for Ahsoka Tano—but fans not as familiar with "Star Wars" lore may be confused by her appearance in the show.
newsweek.com
Would Donald Trump Pardoning Himself be an Admission of Guilt?
Speculation about the president issuing himself with a pardon has grown since the election on November 3.
newsweek.com
Why I Still Perform at Weddings Despite the Pandemic
All of my income comes from live events. What else am I supposed to do?
slate.com
Glossier is offering 25% off everything through Cyber Monday
It's officially that time of year for Glossier's annual Cyber Week sale. The brand is offering 25% off its entire site now through Cyber Monday.
edition.cnn.com
The Unbearable Banality of Romance Novel Décor
Why does every romantic hero have the same open-plan living room and floor-model sectional?
slate.com
Does Lamar Jackson Have Coronavirus? QB Latest Ravens Player to Test Positive
Baltimore has placed 10 players on the reserve/COVID-19 list, as outbreak threatens the game against Pittsburgh on Sunday.
newsweek.com
Diego Maradona laid to rest in Buenos Aires
Legendary soccer great Diego Maradona has been buried near the grave of his parents at a cemetery outside Buenos Aires. Diego Laje describes how Argentinians are remembering the late football star.
edition.cnn.com
Meet the Sean Hannity of Newsmax, the Cable Network Where Trump Hasn’t Lost
Newsmax is siphoning viewers from Fox News, and Greg Kelly is its star.
slate.com
Florida State Representative Says He's Thankful Joe Biden Lost the Election
The Trump campaign and his allies have made unsubstantiated claims that votes were stolen from the president.
1 h
newsweek.com
A Call for Late Justice for Col. Larry Franklin | Opinion
The problem with Col. Franklin's plight isn't simply that he is a long-suffering innocent patriot. It's that Col. Franklin was targeted and prosecuted, and his life was destroyed, to advance an anti-Semitic political agenda.
1 h
newsweek.com
Iran's Rouhani Declares End of 'Trumpism'
Iranian officials have been celebrating Trump's electoral defeat, but the president's lame duck period could bring more American action against Tehran.
1 h
newsweek.com
Wait, Wait, Don't Inaugurate: Why The U.S. Takes So Long To Change Presidents
How is it that the Brits can have a newly elected prime minister meeting with the queen to form a new government within a day or two, but Americans need 10 or 11 weeks to install a new crew?
1 h
npr.org
Black Friday, stock markets reopen, college football: 5 things to know Friday
Black Friday will look pretty different this year, the U.S. stock markets will reopen for shorter sessions and more news to start your Friday.       
1 h
usatoday.com
Australian Professor Returns Home Following 2-Year Imprisonment In Iran
Kylie Moore Gilbert, an Australian professor, was arrested in Iran in 2018 and later received a 10-year prison sentence for espionage, charges which she vehemently denies.
1 h
npr.org