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China suma siete casos más de origen extranjero aunque siguen los efectos del rebrote en Hong Kong

El Ministerio de Salud de China ha confirmado este martes tan solo siete contagios por coronavirus, todos ellos de origen extranjero, mientras que en Hong Kong continúan los efectos de los recientes rebrotes, y tras casi una treintena de nuevos positivos en el último día, son ya 4.586 los casos acumulados.
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What Happened to Selena Quintanilla's Husband Chris Perez?
Viewers will get a glimpse into Selena Quintanilla and Chris Perez's relationship in the new Netflix show, "Selena: The Series," releasing on Friday.
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newsweek.com
Georgia Senate Democratic Candidates Hold Small Leads a Month Before Runoffs, Poll Finds
Jon Ossoff and Reverend Raphael Warnock hold a tight lead in the polls as President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, former President Barack Obama and former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams all head into a weekend of campaigning before Georgia's voter registration deadline closes.
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newsweek.com
LeBron James re-signs with the LA Lakers for two years
Four-time NBA champion LeBron James has re-signed with the Los Angeles Lakers on a two-year, $85M contract. The contract opens up the possibility of LeBron's son, Bronny, playing in the league at the same time as his father.
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edition.cnn.com
No. 8 BYU to play No. 14 Coastal Carolina; replaces Liberty
No. 8 BYU will play at No. 14 Coastal Carolina on Saturday after the Chanticleers’ original opponent, No. 25 Liberty, was hit with COVID-19 issues.
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foxnews.com
Forget bitcoin. These cryptocurrencies are surging even more
The dramatic rise in bitcoin may seem overly speculative. Yet bitcoin has actually lagged the surges for some other cryptocurrencies.
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edition.cnn.com
'Bear Witness, Take Action 2': When Can You Watch Mark Cuban, Anthony Anderson and More Talk About Racial Justice?
The followup to June's "Bear Witness, Take Action," will feature panel discussions with celebrities, activists, and scholars to talk about the next steps to be taken towards racial justice.
newsweek.com
A one-bowl sheet-pan cookie so easy a child taught me how to make it
Make this one-bowl, easy chocolate chip cookie recipe in about 30 minutes.
washingtonpost.com
The greatest moments of John Wall’s decade with the Wizards
Wall made D.C. his city, with contributions on and off the court.
washingtonpost.com
37 gifts even the coolest teens will love
From vlogging kits to Hydroflasks and cozy fleeces, we've got everything the coolest teens on your list will love.
edition.cnn.com
Deciding how to ring in 2021? Airbnb's new rules aim to thwart New Year's Eve house parties
In the U.S. and elsewhere, travelers without a history of positive reviews won't be able to make one-night Airbnb reservations for New Year's Eve.       
usatoday.com
Not getting any travel postcards? A project in Mali delivers delight — and a lifeline.
Postcards From Timbuktu provides employment for out-of-work guides and feeds our need for mail from far-off places.
washingtonpost.com
Joe Biden is taking office amid a poverty crisis
Christina Animashaun/Vox Columbia researchers project that 5 million to 12 million more people will be in poverty in January than a year before. Poverty actually fell in early to mid-2020, as the pandemic took hold, due to an unprecedented expansion of government safety net programs. But it has since grown and surpassed its early 2020 level, and is poised to increase more if the economic situation remains dire. Those are the major findings from projections made by researchers at the Center on Poverty and Social Policy (CPSP) at Columbia University, who have been developing methods for monthly estimates of poverty during the Covid-19 pandemic. The researchers — Zach Parolin, Chris Wimer, Jane Waldfogel, Jordan Matsudaira, and Megan Curran — use a metric known as the “supplemental poverty measure,” designed as a more consistent and reliable measure of hardship than the official poverty measure used by US government programs. Their metric is hardly perfect — critics argue it “defines poverty down” by setting too low an income threshold — but it’s useful for tracking variations like those experienced during the Covid-19 crisis. According to their data, 15.5 percent of Americans, or 50.3 million people, were living in poverty in January 2020, before the coronavirus crisis began in earnest. In April, after relief measures began, the rate was down to 13.9 percent. The crisis continued, but many relief measures did not. The $1,200 “economic impact payments” (a.k.a. stimulus checks) were a one-off. The $600-per-week boost to unemployment insurance expired at the end of July. And poverty began creeping back up again, reaching 17.3 percent in August, and 16.7 percent, or about 54.2 million people, in September. In other words, about 4 million more people were in poverty by September than were at the beginning of 2020. That’s a quite large degradation in living standards. Christina Animashaun/Vox Looking ahead to January 2021 requires making some assumptions about unemployment. The rate as of October was 6.9 percent, a swift improvement from the peak of 14.7 percent in April. But it’s still nearly double what it was in February before the crisis. The Columbia researchers’ findings confirm that the January 2021 poverty situation will depend heavily on unemployment. They find that even if unemployment falls to 5 percent, which would be a big improvement, poverty will rise modestly from 16.7 percent in September to 17 percent in January, putting another 1 million or so people in poverty for a total of 55.2 million. If, on the other hand, unemployment remains elevated, the situation gets substantially worse. If it ticks up to 7.5 percent, then poverty will reach 18.1 percent, or 58.8 million people. If the situation deteriorates substantially and unemployment rises to 10 percent again, then poverty will rise to 19.1 percent of Americans — 62.1 million. The upshot is this: Depending on the scale of the broader economic recovery, between 4.9 million and 11.8 million more people will be living in poverty in January 2021 than were in January 2020. This is a large increase even compared to the Great Recession. The same Columbia research group estimates that from 2007 to 2011, poverty measured the same way rose from 14.4 percent to 16.1 percent of the population, a 1.7-point increase. The best-case scenario of 5 percent unemployment in January 2021, by comparison, registers as a 1.5-point increase in poverty, similar in scale to the Great Recession. If we don’t get down to 5 percent unemployment, the effects could be worse than the Great Recession. Signs of a large decline in living standards for low-income Americans The Columbia team is not the only group of researchers attempting to track living standards for Americans in poverty on a monthly basis during this crisis. Jeehoon Han of Zhejiang University, Bruce Meyer of the University of Chicago, and James X. Sullivan at the University of Notre Dame have their own set of real-time measures, and while they do not calculate projections for January 2021, they tell the same story as the Columbia researchers about what happened from January to October 2020. The poverty rate, as they measure it, fell from 10.9 percent in January/February to 9.4 percent in April/May/June (they average months in an attempt to minimize error). But it then ticked up dramatically, from 9.4 percent to 11.3 percent in September and October. “Nearly 7 million have been added to the ranks of the poor since May,” the researchers write in their most recent release. “Poverty appears to have risen in October even though the unemployment rate fell by more than a percentage point.” That disconnect is partially a temporary result of the expiration of aid programs — but if it holds, then poverty could rise even more with falling unemployment than the Columbia numbers suggest. One thing to keep in mind when interpreting these two sets of numbers is that the Columbia team defines people and households as “in poverty” if they fall below a certain income threshold (adjusted for cost of living in their area and a few other factors) during a particular month. That has advantages, particularly during a rapidly evolving crisis like this one, but also disadvantages: It only counts tax credits, for instance, as income for the month when a person’s tax refund is delivered. So if a low-income worker got a large earned income tax credit (EITC) in March, that counts as a several-thousand-dollar windfall for just that month — which helps explain why the Columbia measure sees poverty falling in March, even before Covid-19 relief measures were implemented. The Zhejiang/Chicago/Notre Dame team, by contrast, uses an annual reference period: It is trying to estimate how many people fell below a certain income level in the past 12 months. That gets around problems like the EITC but might make income fluctuations look smaller than they feel: If you lost all your pay in April, that would only show up as an 8 percent fall in your annual income, measured from the previous April. On a monthly basis, though, your income fell 100 percent. Another indication of an increase in that kind of short-run need is the nationwide surge in demand for supplies from food banks. A report from Hunger Free America found that in New York City, food pantries and soup kitchens fed 65.1 percent more people in 2020 than in 2019; that’s compared to a 10 percent increase in people served the year before. The Greater Boston Food Bank told the Boston Globe that it went from distributing 1 million pounds of food per week to 415,000 people pre-pandemic to 2.5 million pounds per week to over 660,000 people. The St. Louis Area Foodbank in Missouri reports that it went from distributing 3.1 million meals a month pre-pandemic to 5 million meals a month now. In Grand Rapids, the South Michigan Food Bank reported distributing more food in October than it had in any prior month in its 38-year history, covering both the early 1980s recession and the Great Recession. Underlying these trends is an increase in food insecurity, which is closely linked to income poverty. The next stimulus needs to address the increase in poverty One of the first tasks the Biden administration will face in January is crafting a stimulus package that will pick up where the package that expired at the end of July left off. The expiration of the $600-a-week bonus unemployment benefit appears to have substantially increased need and poverty at the low end, and reviving a bonus benefit and providing other income support policies will be critical for avoiding further increases in poverty and returning the poverty rate to where it was in January 2020, if not lower. President-elect Biden has outlined what his preferred stimulus package would look like in considerable detail. It includes extending the $600-per-week unemployment insurance bonus; extensive aid to state, local, and tribal governments; and a $250-per-child monthly allowance for families, boosted to $300 per month per child for kids under 6. But congressional Democrats have struggled to get a deal matching these parameters through the Republican-controlled Senate, or even a more limited one with, say, $400 per week in bonus UI payments. Republican leader Mitch McConnell has insisted on a lower-cost package that includes civil immunity for businesses that put people at risk of Covid-19 infection. McConnell is likely to hold that line if he controls the Senate under Biden; control of the Senate will be determined in two Georgia runoff elections on January 5. The main challenge for policymakers interested in poverty alleviation, then, will be convincing McConnell and his allies to support stimulus and income support at the level that’s needed to reverse the increase in poverty. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter. Twice a week, you’ll get a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling our biggest challenges: improving public health, decreasing human and animal suffering, easing catastrophic risks, and — to put it simply — getting better at doing good.
vox.com
Ivanka Trump Offers to Take COVID Vaccine After Former Presidents Signal Willingness to Reassure Americans
Former Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton recently said they will take a COVID-19 vaccine publicly once one is approved by the FDA.
newsweek.com
States expecting coronavirus vaccines in coming weeks
State officials nationwide have begun announcing that initial doses of coronavirus vaccines, namely that of Pfizer, are expected in the coming weeks.
foxnews.com
Liberal MSNBC host Joy Reid, CNN's Angela Rye push back on Obama, double down on 'Defund police' slogan
The left can’t seem to come together when it comes to the polarizing "defund the police" slogan, creating infighting between Democratic politicians, activists and members of the mainstream media.
foxnews.com
Call of Duty video game tournament Dec. 11 pits US, UK armed forces against each other for charity
Esports teams from the U.S. and U.K. military branches will compete in online Call of Duty matches to raise money for employment of veterans.       
usatoday.com
Gonzaga and Baylor to face off in rare top-2 meeting
The first week of the college basketball season was filled with great games, a few upsets, stellar performances and a handful of coronavirus cancelations.
foxnews.com
Mother in Sweden no longer suspected of confining son to apartment for 28 years
Prosecutors in Sweden are dropping a case against a 70-year-old woman accused of locking up her son inside their apartment for nearly three decades, saying investigators have found no evidence he was being held against his will.
foxnews.com
Entertainment Weekly, Martha Stewart Living, and Other Meredith Publications Form Editorial Union
Cindy OrdSeveral well-known publications at one of the largest publishers in the country are forming an editorial union.Nearly 100 employees of Iowa-based publisher Meredith, including staff at magazines Entertainment Weekly, Martha Stewart Living, and Shape, along with streaming network PeopleTV, have announced their intention to form a joint editorial union, partially as a bulwark against cuts the company implemented during the coronavirus pandemic.“This is the time, now more than ever we need to speak up, have a seat at the table, and be a part of decision making,” Maureen Lenker, a writer at Entertainment Weekly, said in a brief telephone call with The Daily Beast.Read more at The Daily Beast.
thedailybeast.com
With Washington tenure over, can John Wall resurrect career in Houston?
SportsPulse: USA TODAY Sports' Jeff Zillgitt discusses the end of the John Wall era in Washington and why Houston may be the perfect place for him to resurrect his career.        
usatoday.com
The Show Is Over. The Horror Is Still Here.
Defeating Trump was never going to be enough.
slate.com
NYC mayor: First COVID vaccine shipments could come by Dec. 15
"The cavalry is coming," he said, "and the moment we have all been waiting for is finally here."
cbsnews.com
Trump 2024 is the absolute worst-case scenario for Republicans
Fresh off his reelection defeat, Donald Trump is already musing about running again in 2024. In the latest episode of The Point, CNN's Chris Cillizza explains why that could doom Republicans for decades to come.
edition.cnn.com
Supreme Court sides with church challenging California's COVID restrictions
In an unsigned order with no noted dissents, the Supreme Court said a federal district court must revisit an earlier ruling against the church.
cbsnews.com
Top Republicans Bash Pro-Trump Lawyers Ahead of Georgia Runoffs: 'Looney Tunes'
"Every Georgia conservative who cares about America MUST vote in the runoff. Their don't vote strategy will cripple America," former House Speaker Newt Gingrich tweeted.
newsweek.com
Dua Lipa: There's more pressure on young women in pop music to prove themselves
Preview: The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter talks with "CBS Sunday Morning" about her hit album, "Future Nostalgia."
cbsnews.com
Painting through the pandemic
Artists continue to create, while maintaining social distance, during the global pandemic.
edition.cnn.com
College basketball COVID-19 updates: Rick Pitino tweets Iona's game is canceled
On the morning of Iona's first home game, men's basketball coach Rick Pitino tweeted that it was canceled due to opponent's positive COVID-19 test.       
usatoday.com
‘Southern Charm’ star Shep Rose penning memoir, ‘Average Expectations’
Rose wants to go from a party boy to a best-selling author.
nypost.com
NYC officials expect first COVID-19 vaccine shipments as early as December 15
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Thursday that officials expect the first shipments of a COVID-19 ​vaccine as early as December 15. "The cavalry is coming," he said, "and the moment we have all been waiting for is finally here." Watch his remarks.
cbsnews.com
Are Christmas Trees Toxic for Cats and Dogs? How to Keep Your Pet Safe
Several festive holiday plants found in the house around Christmas time can also be hazardous for pets.
newsweek.com
It's 'Heather' Day for Conan Gray Fans: Best Memes and Mentions About TikTok's Favorite Song
It's December third, which means it's time to grab a cozy sweater.
newsweek.com
Trump thanks Alabama congressman who says he will challenge Electoral College votes
President Trump on Thursday thanked Alabama Republican Rep. Mo Brooks, who said he plans to challenge the Electoral College votes next month when Congress meets Jan. 6 to certify the 2020 presidential election.
foxnews.com
Cat standing up is ready to take on the world
While some cats stare, this one stands. See how Riggs, a 5-year-old black-and-white kitty in Luxemburg, Wisconsin, comfortably sits on his back legs. Subscribe to our YouTube!
nypost.com
Video shows moment Nevada cops open fire on man holding boy hostage in car
A man holding a 12-year-old boy hostage in Nevada was shot dead by officers who opened fire as he held a gun to the youngster’s head, intense police bodycam video shows. The footage, released Wednesday by Henderson police, shows officers responding to an apartment complex where Jason Neo Bourne, 38, was holding Joseph Hawatmeh at...
nypost.com
Fauci to speak with Biden transition team for first time
Dr. Anthony Fauci told CBS News that he will meet with members of President-elect Joe Biden's transition team on Thursday to discuss the incoming administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic. Fauci spoke to CBS News chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett for this week's episode of "The Takeout" podcast.
cbsnews.com
Costco stocks shelves with plant-based Beyond Meatballs at select locations
Beyond Meatballs' are rolling out to select Costco stores this week. The suggested retail price is $9.99 for a pack of 24 meatballs.       
usatoday.com
Trump continues to push false claims of election fraud in Facebook video
President Trump posted a long Facebook video where he repeatedly denounced the November election as "rigged," even though Attorney General William Barr said the Justice Department has seen no evidence of election fraud. CBS News White House correspondent Paula Reid joins CBSN's Anne-Marie Green and Vladimir Duthiers with the latest.
cbsnews.com
Man Confesses To Murder of Mother To 'Teach Her a Lesson,' Say Police
"During his booking at Garfield County Detention Facility, Perosi reiterated he had murdered Ferguson and said he was glad he'd done so," police said in a statement.
newsweek.com
American Airlines' 737 Max returns to the skies
American Airlines is taking its long-grounded Boeing 737 Max jets out of storage, updating key flight-control software, and flying the planes in preparation for the first flights with paying passengers later this month. (Dec. 3)       
usatoday.com
Joey Jones blasts the politicization of the American flag during Trump presidency
Fox News contributor Joey Jones on Thursday blasted the politicization of the American flag during President Trump’s term in office.
foxnews.com
Battle-Weary Nurses Wonder If New York Hospitals Can Handle Another Coronavirus Surge
Compared to last spring, there's more clinical knowledge about how to treat COVID-19, and bigger stockpiles of protective equipment. But nurses worry about staffing shortages as patient numbers grow.
npr.org
Here’s what to know about Metro’s proposed service cuts
The pandemic wiped out hundreds of millions of dollars in expected fare revenue for Metro.
washingtonpost.com
The Daily 202: As 2,798 Americans die, Trump’s ‘most important speech’ makes only passing reference to pandemic
President fixates on baseless fraud allegations as CDC director warns U.S. death toll could reach 450,000 by February.
washingtonpost.com
10 things you need to know about cast iron skillets
They're not as hard to work with as you may think      
usatoday.com
Amazon’s ‘The Lord of the Rings’ Series Adds 20 Cast Members
The series, which will explore new storylines preceding The Fellowship of the Ring, is currently filming in New Zealand.
nypost.com
Tyreek Hill once thought Patrick Mahomes was ‘trash.’ Now they’re the NFL’s deadliest duo.
From initial skepticism blossomed a dynamic combination that is terrorizing the NFL.
washingtonpost.com
Save over $200 on the most thoughtful gift this holiday season
Just because you can’t be with your loved ones this holiday season, doesn’t mean you can’t give them a gift that makes them feel like you are. Meet Lifekive, an exclusive concierge service that is designed to help you curate and preserve treasured moments and important milestones. Think This is Your Life, in a modern...
nypost.com