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Detenidos en Brasil los ex directivos de la aerolínea colombiana Avianca Germán y José Efromovich

Los hermanos Germán y José Efromovich, antiguos directivos de la aerolínea colombiana Avianca y aún accionistas de Avianca Holdings, han sido detenidos este miércoles en Brasil en el marco de las investigaciones sobre el escándalo de corrupción 'Lava Jato'.
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Over 2,400 workers at world's top glove maker get COVID
The outbreak has raised the possibility of supply disruptions during the pandemic​.
5 m
cbsnews.com
Giving thanks may make your brain more altruistic
There’s a deep neural connection between gratitude and generosity. | Getty Images Neuroscience is revealing a fascinating link between gratitude and generosity. Over Thanksgiving, in between mouthfuls of turkey and sweet potato pie, many of us will be asking ourselves: What are we grateful for? Taking a moment to practice gratitude like this isn’t an empty holiday tradition. It’s good for our mental and physical health. And here’s another thing:It can actually change our brains in ways that make us more altruistic — just in time for Giving Tuesday. The past two decades have seen a flurry of research on gratitude, beginning in the early 2000s with a series of landmark papers by Robert Emmons, Michael McCullough, and other psychologists. In recent years, we’ve learned through several scientific studies that there’s a deep neural connection between gratitude and giving — they share a pathway in the brain — and that when we’re grateful, our brains become more charitable. Christina Karns, a neuroscientist at the University of Oregon, is one of the leading researchers in this field. In 2017, she wondered what happens in the brain when you receive a gift versus when you give one — and whether the neural response differs depending on your character. So she placed study participants in a brain scanner and had them watch as a computer moved real money into their own account or gave it to a food bank instead. Karns described what she learned: It turns out that the neural connection between gratitude and giving is very deep, both literally and figuratively. A region deep in the frontal lobe of the brain, called the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, is key to supporting both. Anatomically, this region is wired up to be a hub for processing the value of risk and reward; it’s richly connected to even deeper brain regions that provide a kick of pleasurable neurochemicals in the right circumstances. The participants I’d identified as more grateful and more altruistic via a questionnaire [showed] a stronger response in these reward regions of the brain when they saw the charity gaining money. It felt good for them to see the food bank do well. Next, Karns wanted to know whether, by changing how much gratitude people felt, she could change the way the brain reacts to giving and getting. So she split participants into two groups. Over three weeks, one group journaled about the things they were grateful for, while the other group journaled about other (non-gratitude-specific) happenings in their lives. The people in the gratitude-journaling contingent reported experiencing more thankfulness. What’s more, the reward regions of their brain started responding more to charitable giving than to gaining money for themselves. As Karns writes: Practicing gratitude shifted the value of giving in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. It changed the exchange rate in the brain. Giving to charity became more valuable than receiving money yourself. After the brain calculates the exchange rate, you get paid in the neural currency of reward, the delivery of neurotransmitters that signal pleasure and goal attainment. These are striking (though likely not permanent) effects. Of course, we still needmore research to fully understand the brain mechanisms underlying gratitude, giving, and how they relate. But for those of us who don’t always find resonant the old adage that “giving is better than receiving,” Karns’s results,if true, offer a useful amendment: Giving really can be better — if you make it so. You can proactively choose to retrain your brain so it gets more pleasure out of giving. Here are some effective ways to cultivate gratitude If increasing people’s gratitude is an effective way to increase their charitableness, then maybe it’s worth nudging people to cultivate more gratitude. For now, we’ve got at least one such nudge built into our calendar: Thanksgiving. Many religious traditions also include daily practices meant to foster gratitude, and scientific studies have shown that some — like prayer — really do have that effect. If practicing gratitude isn’t yet part of your daily routine and you’d like to cultivate it throughout the year and not only on Thanksgiving, here are a few practices that researchers have found to be effective in boosting thankfulness. Gratitude journaling: This simple practice — jotting down things you’re grateful for — has gained popularity over the past few years. But studies show there are more and less effective ways to do it. Researchers say it’s better to write in detail about one particular thing, really savoring it, than to dash off a superficial list of things. They recommend that you try to focus on people you’re grateful to, because that’s more impactful than focusing on things, and that you focus on events that surprised you, because they generally elicit stronger feelings of thankfulness. Researchers also note that writing in a gratitude journal once or twice a week is better for your well-being than doing it every day. In one study, people who wrote once a week for six weeks reported increased happiness afterward; people who wrote three times a week didn’t. That’s because our brains have an annoying habit called hedonic adaptation. “We adapt to positive events quickly, especially if we constantly focus on them,” Emmons explains. “It seems counterintuitive, but it is how the mind works.” Gratitude letters and visits: Another practice is to write a letter of gratitude to someone. Research shows it significantly increases your levels of gratitude, even if you never actually send the letter. And the effects on the brain can last for months. In one study, subjects who participated in gratitude letter writing expressed more thankfulness and showed more activity in their pregenual anterior cingulate cortex — an area involved in predicting the outcomes of our actions — three months later. Some psychologists, like Martin Seligman, Sonja Lyubomirsky, and Jeffrey Froh,have studied a variation on the gratitude letter practice by having participants write a letter to someone they’ve never properly thanked, then visit the person and read the letter aloud to them. A 2009 study led by Froh found that teens experienced a big increase in positive emotions after doing a gratitude visit — even two months later. Experiential consumption: There’s another way to foster gratitude and thwart hedonic adaptation that seems especially relevant to the upcoming gift-buying season: Spend your money on experiences, not things. The Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley summarizes a major study on experiential consumption like this: Across six experiments, this study found that people felt and expressed more gratitude following a purchase of an experience (e.g., concert tickets or meals out) than a purchase of a material good (e.g., clothing or jewelry). According to the researchers, these experiments suggest that “as a naturalistic behavior that is relatively resistant to adaptation, experiential consumption may be an especially easy way to encourage the experience of gratitude.” In other words, if you’re going to buy something special this holiday season, consider making it an experience. The resultant gratitude is more likely to stick around in the brain — and where gratitude abounds, altruism may follow. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter. Twice a week, you’ll get a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling our biggest challenges: improving public health, decreasing human and animal suffering, easing catastrophic risks, and — to put it simply — getting better at doing good.
7 m
vox.com
The 10 Best YA and Children’s Books of 2020
The events of this year—a global pandemic, a reckoning with racist violence and oppression, a tumultuous presidential election—have touched everyone’s lives, children and teenagers included. And there are few resources more powerful than books to impart lessons on how to make sense of a divided and often dangerous world. The best young adult, middle grade…
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time.com
Ethiopia’s Tigray conflict reflects unresolved ethnic tensions
Regional self-government rights are being tested.
washingtonpost.com
Google may be hit with second antitrust suit as soon as next month
Less than a month after being sued by the Department of Justice over maintaining “unlawful monopolies” in its search and advertising businesses, Google is staring down the barrel of a second antitrust lawsuit. A bipartisan group of US states is gearing up to file suit against the search giant as soon as next month, Reuters...
nypost.com
'Christmas on the Square' Soundtrack: The Songs in the Dolly Parton Movie
"Christmas on the Square" on Netflix includes 14 new songs written by Dolly Parton, performed by actors Christine Baranski, Jenifer Lewis and Dolly herself.
newsweek.com
Tyra Banks’ ‘Dancing with the Stars’ finale dress compared to cleaning products on Twitter
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nypost.com
Karina LeBlanc on FIFA's maternity support measures for female players
New FIFA proposals supporting female pros who have children during their careers have been welcomed as a "groundbreaking moment" by high-profile former goalkeeper, Karina LeBlanc.
edition.cnn.com
Enjoy an early Black Friday doorbuster deal on this bestselling hair dryer
We’ve previously waxed poetic about the Adagio Accelerator 2000 Blow Dryer, a bestselling hair dryer that boasts all the benefits of a premium hot tool, without the premium price tag. Why are we so excited about a hairdryer, you ask? If your hair is exposed to dangerous heat post-shower, your strands will begin to flash...
nypost.com
HBO Max Looks to Lasso Big Gains in 2021 After Stumbling Out Of The Gate
HBO Max has been hobbled by tech delays, exec changes, brand confusion and — most damaging of all — carriage disputes with Roku and Amazon.
nypost.com
Dallas Cowboys cancel practice due to non-COVID-19 medical emergency involving staff member
The Dallas Cowboys won't practice Tuesday due to a "non-COVID related medical emergency involving a staff member," the team said.        
usatoday.com
2021 Grammys tap 'The Daily Show' star Trevor Noah to host
Now that the 2020 election is over, "The Daily Show" host Trevor Noah is going to fill his free time with a gig hosting the 2021 Grammy Awards.
foxnews.com
Why is ‘Shawn Mendes: In Wonder’ Rated TV-MA?
What could Shawn Mendes have done to earn that rating?
nypost.com
Joe Concha: Media coverage of Biden transition has been just like the campaign, 'no scrutiny'
President-elect Joe Biden’s transition period will be fawned over by the media compared with President Trump, Fox News contributor Joe Concha said on Tuesday.
foxnews.com
Unexplained metal monolith discovered in remote area of Utah's Red Rock Country
An unexplained monolith was discovered in Utah's Red Rock Country, the Utah Department of Public Safety announced Monday.       
usatoday.com
Why Elizabeth Warren was *never* going to be Treasury secretary
Even before Joe Biden won the presidency earlier this month, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren made clear that she wanted to be Treasury secretary in his administration.
edition.cnn.com
Dallas Cowboys cancel practice due to non-COVID-19 medical emergency
The Dallas Cowboys won't practice Tuesday due to a "non-COVID related medical emergency involving a staff member," the team said.       
usatoday.com
China War Talk Escalates As U.S. Helps Taiwan Build Homemade Submarines
The Chinese Communist Party's hawkish tabloid newspaper "Global Times" said the People's Liberation Army's frequent military drills were meant as more than just a warning to Taiwan and the U.S.
newsweek.com
Ed Stack, Dick’s Sporting Goods CEO who took stance on guns, to step down
Stack, 65, who is also the company’s largest shareholder, will be succeeded as CEO on Feb. 1 by Lauren Hobart, who has been president of the retailer since 2017 as well as a director.
nypost.com
20 bestselling e-learning deals are an extra 70 percent off ahead of Black Friday
People are already going to be spending a lot of time at home this holiday season and all through winter, so you might as well learn a new skill. Below, you will find 20 bestselling e-learning deals that are an extra 70% off ahead of Black Friday. Yup, an extra 70% off online classes that...
nypost.com
Black Friday 2020: The best Nike and Adidas deals
Check out great Black Friday deals on Nike and Adidas products like Ultraboost running shoes, Pro tights, joggers, track pants and more.       
usatoday.com
China says it will respond to US admiral visit to Taiwan
BEIJING/MANILA – China will respond to the reported visit of a US Navy admiral to Taiwan and firmly opposes any military relations between Taipei and Washington, the Chinese Foreign Ministry said on Monday as a senior US official praised their ties with Taipei. A two-star Navy admiral overseeing US military intelligence in the Asia-Pacific region...
nypost.com
Seattle to Slash Police Budget by Around 20 Percent—Far Less Than What Officials Promised
Most members of the Seattle City Council had pledged to reduce the Seattle Police Department's funding by 50 percent over the summer.
newsweek.com
Early Black Friday price drop on smart robot vacuum Amazon reviewers love
There are tools that help you clean, and then there are tools that clean for you. We’ve talked about the Cybovac E30 Robot Vacuum Cleaner before, but with this early Black Friday price drop, we had to do it again. This awesome vacuum features gyroptic smart navigation, meaning it cleans your home in a zig-zag...
nypost.com
Jennifer Grey talks 'Dirty Dancing 2' without Patrick Swayze
The "Dirty Dancing" sequel is special to star Jennifer Grey, but she's well aware it won't be the same without Patrick Swayze.
edition.cnn.com
Tucker Carlson outlines the post-Trump playbook
A lengthy investigation and new restrictions on voting to start.
washingtonpost.com
Hollywood's casting dilemma: Should straight, cisgender actors play LGBTQ characters?
With too few LGBTQ roles in Hollywood, industry experts say queer and transgender actors should play characters that represent these communities.        
usatoday.com
Congressman seeks to have Rudy Giuliani disbarred over attempts to overturn election
NJ Rep. Bill Pascrell (D) cited fraud and misconduct in his complaints against Giuliani.
washingtonpost.com
New York Times takes three days to print significant correction on Georgia recount
The New York Times took three days to print a correction of a significant error in its reporting about the Georgia recount process.
foxnews.com
If you want to help charities hurt by COVID-19, new tax rules make 2020 a good time to donate
Nearly two-thirds of charity organizations in Arizona expect to face net operating losses of at least 10%, and some are worried about surviving.       
usatoday.com
Haley Moore overcomes bullying to become LPGA professional
Haley Moore used to be "so afraid" of going to school given the bullying was so relentless.
edition.cnn.com
Golfer overcomes bullying to become LPGA professional
Haley Moore used to be "so afraid" of going to school given the bullying was so relentless.
edition.cnn.com
Haley Moore overcomes bullying to become LPGA professional
Haley Moore used to be "so afraid" of going to school given the bullying was so relentless.
edition.cnn.com
Cannabis stocks are soaring again
Shares of major cannabis stocks are soaring once again following the news that Joe Biden's transition has formally begun. The uptick is fueled by expectations that the incoming administration will loosen regulations, as well as more US states legalizing sales of recreational marijuana.
edition.cnn.com
Remarkable fireball captured breaking up on film
An enormous fireball was caught on camera streaking across the night sky in Australia, before breaking up over the Tasman Sea.
foxnews.com
Barack Obama says he 'could not have been prouder' of daughters Sasha and Malia joining protests
Former President Barack Obama revealed his daughters, Sasha and Malia Obama joined protests this summer.        
usatoday.com
Miley Cyrus is 2 weeks sober after setback during pandemic
"I didn't, and I fell off and I realized that I now am back on sobriety, two weeks sober, and you know I feel like I really accepted that time."
nypost.com
The G-20 didn’t do much for poor nations. They need debt relief, especially from China.
For the incoming Biden administration, the debt crisis presents an opportunity to prevent global poverty and hold China accountable.
washingtonpost.com
Bowl projections: Final rankings before first College Football Playoff committee reveal
The last bowl projections before the College Football Playoff committee reveals its initial rankings offers a prediction of the playoff field.        
usatoday.com
What Janet Yellen Has Said About COVID Stimulus, Checks
The former Federal Reserve chair called for Americans to receive "extraordinary" support amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
newsweek.com
Netflix is Poised to Dominate the Oscars Like Never Before
Covid or coincidence? Netflix's aggressive Oscar strategy is paying off big time.
nypost.com
This Thanksgiving, don’t scrimp on gratitude
Hey, things could be much, much worse.
washingtonpost.com
Daniel Cormier takes umbrage with Jon Jones' claims of innocence on PED use
When it comes to Jon Jones' failed drug tests, Daniel Cormier would like the record to show that "they never proved him innocent."        Related StoriesVideo: Derrick Lewis breaks UFC record for most heavyweight knockoutsDanny Chavez vs. Jared Gordon set for UFC Fight Night on Feb. 20Released by UFC, Anderson Silva still wants to fight after 'attempt to force (his) retirement' 
usatoday.com
Dollars and decisions: Will the Dodgers dive in when the hot stove league heats up?
The Dodgers should have the payroll wiggle room to add players this offseason and not surpass the competitive balance tax threshold.
latimes.com
COVID-19 hospitalizations in Maine surpass 100 for the first time
Coronavirus hospitalizations in Maine have surpassed 100 for the first time, according to state health data. As of Monday, at least 103 people in the state were hospitalized due to COVID-19, an increase of eight from the day before. Nearly a month ago, just 13 people in Maine were hospitalized because of the virus. The...
nypost.com
China Lashes Back at Pope Francis over Comments of Uighur Persecution
The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has struck back at Pope Francis for his comments on the persecution of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang.
breitbart.com
Two-time All-Star pitcher Charlie Morton signs one-year, $15 million deal with the Braves
Right-handed pitcher Charlie Morton signed a one-year, $15 million deal with the Braves, the club announced on Tuesday.       
usatoday.com
Construction worker who died after shooting mourned as loving grandfather dedicated to job
Police say Elias Flores was shot in the head during a robbery as he renovated a house in Northeast Washington.
washingtonpost.com