Herramientas
Change country:

El coronavirus altera profundamente los ritos funerarios en América Latina

El rito funerario, que en América Latina se llena de historia y arte en panteones patrimoniales y cementerios de pueblos milenarios, también ha sufrido las consecuencias del brutal contagio del coronavirus en el mundo.

Seguir leyendo....


Carga más
Leer artículo completo sobre: elperiodico.com
Stimulus Clock Ticking as Congress Has Just 14 Days To Work Out Relief Package This Year
Democrats and Republicans remain opposed about the scope of financial relief, but the topic is expected to be near the top of the agenda as the end of the year draws near.
5 m
newsweek.com
NFL picks for Week 12: Giants will win — and cover
COVID-19 has wreaked havoc with the Week 12 NFL schedule. The Thanksgiving night game between the Baltimore Ravens and Pittsburgh Steelers was pushed back to Sunday afternoon and then again to Tuesday night because of an outbreak of positive tests on the Ravens, including quarterback Lamar Jackson. The Denver Broncos might have to use a...
7 m
nypost.com
The Richest Town in Every State
The names of these towns conjure up images of grand mansions, luxury cars, and ritzy restaurants. See which town in your home state is the richest. Who knows—your hometown might even be on this list.
8 m
newsweek.com
A Knife Is a Perfect Gift. They’re on Sale (and Ship Free) at Sur La Table
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Scouted/Getty ImagesIf you know someone who even remotely enjoys cooking, a knife is an excellent present. At Sur La Table not only do they ship free, but they are also on sale at up to 50% off. Choose between a set of steak knives, a do-it-all set, or just one or two on their own. Whatever you buy, they’re guaranteed to love it.Let Scouted guide you to the best Cyber Monday deals. Shop Here >Scouted selects products independently and prices reflect what was available at the time of publish. Sign up for our newsletter for more recommendations and deals. Curious about a specific product or brand? Let us know! If you buy something from our posts, we may earn a small commission.Read more at The Daily Beast.
8 m
thedailybeast.com
Dear Care and Feeding: Was It Wrong of Me to Explain to My Daughter the True Meaning of “WAP”?
Parenting advice on honesty, coming out, and repeating kindergarten.
8 m
slate.com
How to Rescue Someone From a Conspiracy Theory
What to say when a family member has gone off the deep end.
8 m
slate.com
Earth is way closer to a supermassive black hole than we thought
But scientists say not to worry.
9 m
cbsnews.com
Pfizer COVID Vaccine Flown Into U.S. Ahead of Planned Nationwide Rollout in December
Chartered United Airlines flights have begun landing in the United States with officials planning to distribute millions of doses if it is given approval by regulators, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
newsweek.com
Live updates: Hong Kong reports highest single-day increase since August
edition.cnn.com
Southeast braces for heavy rain, potential flash flooding
As the U.S. approaches the end of the Thanksgiving weekend, forecasters are eyeing a developing storm system along the northern Gulf coast.
foxnews.com
Tristan Thompson becomes a U.S. citizen: "Truly living the American dream"
"I came to the U.S. on a student visa and have always had big dreams. I'm now truly living the American dream," Thompson said.
cbsnews.com
Denver Broncos have no quarterbacks available for Sunday's game
The Denver Broncos have lost all of their quarterbacks for Sunday's game against the New Orleans Saints, after they were declared ineligible for play due to NFL Covid-19 protocols. Carolyn Manno has the latest.
edition.cnn.com
David Prowse, English actor and weightlifter who embodied Darth Vader, dies at 85
The actor used his towering height and broad shoulders to portray the bionic body of the evil Darth Vader in the original “Star Wars” trilogy.
washingtonpost.com
Enter FOX Bet’s free $100,000 contest: You can count on Raiders to win a close one
This week’s Sunday NFL Super 6 contest, run by FOX Bet, includes a particularly intriguing matchup between the Las Vegas Raiders (-3) and Atlanta Falcons. The 6-4 Raiders nearly completed a season sweep of the Chiefs on Sunday. Along with handing 9-1 Kansas City its only loss earlier this year, Las Vegas has beaten the...
nypost.com
Darth Vader actor from original Star Wars trilogy, Dave Prowse, dies at 85
Dave Prowse, the British actor who played Darth Vader in the original “Star Wars” trilogy has died at the age of 85, according to his agent.
abcnews.go.com
David Prowse, the original Darth Vader, passes away
British actor David Prowse, who played Darth Vader in the original "Star Wars" trilogy, has died aged 85, his management company announced. CNN's Brian Stelter reports.
edition.cnn.com
Americans are voting to legalize weed. It’s unlikely the next Congress will do the same.
Despite support for legalization in the House, the Senate is expected to keep holding up federal marijuana change next year.
1 h
politico.com
Op-Ed: One of America's great wildernesses is being destroyed, bit by bit, in a silent massacre
Unlike most of the nation's great river systems, the Mobile Basin has survived with its rich biodiversity mostly intact. That is changing.
1 h
latimes.com
‘Time For My Flag to Go Up’: How Anti-Trumpers Are Reclaiming the American Flag
Over the past four years, the flag has been re-cast as a kind of MAGA shorthand. Now, Trump foes are ready to take the symbol back.
1 h
politico.com
15 great tech gifts for everyone on your list
Black Friday started way back in October, with some of the best sales to come this weekend. Tech is going to be one of the biggest items people want to get and to give.
1 h
foxnews.com
All the best Cyber Monday deals you can shop at Amazon
We're technically still a day away from Cyber Monday — but don't tell that to Amazon. The most massive online retailer has already posted sales galore for the second major shopping holiday in four days.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
So you thought the campaign and election were ugly? Just wait until January.
With Congress poised to be nearly evenly divided, can the middle-ground Problem Solvers Caucus emerge to get things done?        
1 h
usatoday.com
Score deep savings on an Apple Watch Series 6, SE and Series 5
Black Friday might have passed, but that doesn't mean the deals have vanished. In fact, you can still score an Apple Watch for a steal of a deal. The SE and Series 6 which launched in September are seeing strong discounts along with the Series 5 from last year. Let's not waste any minutes and break out the best deals.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Dan Gainor: Biden news coverage goes to the dogs — media lap up word of pets returning to White House
News coverage of Joe Biden is already going to the dogs — and cats. Literally. Dogged reporters who howled at every tweet by President Trump are now writing about the incoming pet owner in chief bringing animals to the White House.
1 h
foxnews.com
Can Janet Yellen Save the Economy From Mitch McConnell? | Opinion
Janet Yellen's first battle; Big Business gets some spine; and Rolling Stones touring keyboardist Chuck Leavell's hope for environmental salvation.
1 h
newsweek.com
William Barber on Truth and Reconciliation After Trump
On November 7, after four days of counting votes, Democrats celebrated the end of a “long national nightmare.” And when former Vice President Joe Biden took the stage in Wilmington, Delaware, to deliver his victory speech that Saturday night, he quickly extended a hand to President Donald Trump’s supporters, who may have felt demoralized by the loss.“I understand the disappointment tonight,” Biden said. “I’ve lost a couple of times myself. But now let’s give each other a chance... This is a time to heal in America.” Prior to the November election, Trump and Biden supporters alike argued that if the other candidate were to be elected, “it would result in lasting harm to the country,” according to a survey from the Pew Research Center.A week after Biden’s victory address, as the Trump campaign worked to challenge and discredit the election results while trying to get hundreds of legally cast votes thrown out on outlandish claims of fraud, Reverend William J. Barber II took a different tack.[Read: The evangelical reckoning begins]On November 15, Barber—a co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, a movement based on the idea that America is in need of a moral revival—stood in the pulpit at Greenleaf Christian Church, in Goldsboro, North Carolina, preaching to a live-stream audience about unity. But his idea of healing looks different from Biden’s. “Don’t think I’ve come to make life cozy for you,” he preached, reading from the Book of Matthew. “I’ve come to cut—make a sharp knife-cut between son and father, daughter and mother, bride and mother-in-law—cut through these cozy domestic arrangements and free you for God.” It seems a strange place to start, but that’s the point, he said. “There has to be division for healing.”I called Barber five days later to chat about that sermon, and the way he emphasized the difference between a cure and healing. We spoke about why it’s not always a good thing that when Christians are asked how they’re doing, many simply say, “Blessed and highly favored.” He said America cannot afford to go back to the “normal” it knew before Trump. “If we don’t have a politics that can have earnest conversation and debate on how your policies are going to impact the least of these, then we are in trouble,” he told me. We were scheduled to speak for 30 minutes; we ended up speaking for more than an hour.After our initial conversation, he called me back. He had just watched Vice President Mike Pence deliver a speech in Canton, Georgia. “We are gonna keep fighting until every legal vote is counted. We are gonna keep fighting until every illegal vote is thrown out,” Pence told a cheering crowd. Barber’s vision is one of racial and economic progress, and he has risen to national prominence during the Trump administration because of his push to restore morality to the public sphere. But, I asked, how did those people cheering Pence factor into that vision? “They have been sold a bill of goods that their way of life is being threatened by the others,” he replied.Martin Luther King Jr. was on Barber’s mind that day. He was thinking about the March on Washington; everyone remembers King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, but many forget its actual title: “Normalcy—Never Again.”Our conversation has been edited for length and clarity.Adam Harris: You’ve often made a point about people getting upset with Jesus for telling the truth—even in his first sermon where he quotes from Isaiah and says he’s come to heal the brokenhearted. How do you think about the mission to heal when people don’t want to hear the truth? How do you reconcile that?Rev. William J. Barber II: Well, I was trained in theology that whatever you call your spiritual experience, if it does not produce a quarrel with the world, then the claim to be spiritual is suspect. Over and over again in the Christian scriptures—in the Christian New Testament, and in the Hebrew Old Testament—the prophets were required to tell the truth in season and out of season, whether folk believed it or not. Oftentimes, they were castigated for telling the truth. The prophet Isaiah, whom you just mentioned, said in Isaiah 10, “Woe unto those who legislate evil and rob the poor of their rights and make women and children their prey.”People forget that when Jesus preached his first sermon—good news to the poor, healing to the brokenhearted, recovery of sight to the blind—he was doing that in the context of Roman oppression. And Roman oppression had also infiltrated the religious cultures, and the religious cultures had begun to serve the oppressor rather than relieve the oppressed. And when he said good news to the poor, that was a radical statement—because in Greek, the word is pathos, which means those who have been made poor by economic exploitation. Then, when he ends it by saying “to declare the acceptable year of the Lord,” that is a direct reference to the Old Testament concept of Jubilee. And Jubilee was when, in the 50th year [of a cycle], all debts were released, all slaves were set free, all oppression was over. He’s basically saying, “I’ve come to say that it’s time for this day, and those who are oppressed have the right, nonviolently, to stand for this day.” And the Bible says, on that day, they tried to kill him. See, oftentimes we don’t keep reading. He almost got killed for his first sermon.And then [in] his last sermon, he says the nation will be judged—not people, not individuals—but the nation will be judged by how it treats the hungry, the thirsty, the sick, the immigrant, and the least of these. Deaths from public policy didn’t start with COVID. People were dying because of the denial of health care in over 14 states that refused to expand health care. People died from that public-policy decision.I said at the National Cathedral when I was invited to preach a sermon entitled “America, Accepting Death Is Not an Option Anymore.” Down through history, we've opted for all of these policies that will have what I call a DM on the DL—a death measurement on the down low. And you can’t ignore that. That truth must be told.[Read: Can the religious Left flip the Bible Belt?]There’s a scripture in Ezekiel where God says to Ezekiel, “I need you to tell the nation the truth.” And they may not hear you, because they are stiff-necked people. But at least they will know there has been a prophet among them. And then in Ezekiel 22, the scripture says the reason why there is so much hurt toward the poor, poverty—and the poor and the immigrants receive no justice—is because the politicians lie. In the King James [Bible] it says “princes.” But the politicians lie; your leaders lie. But worse than that, it says the priests—Harris: That they "violated my law and desecrated my holy things."Barber: Right. The priest encouraged their lying, joined with them, and said things that God has not said. We, as people of faith, may not be able to stop everything that happens. But we can’t exacerbate what happens if we join it, by telling a lie when we ought to tell the truth. But we also exacerbate it if we don’t say anything—because finally, God says, “I looked for somebody to stand in the gap. And I could not find anyone.” That’s one of the most tragic scriptures in all the Bible.Harris: Over the last four years, and especially in the last couple of months, we’ve seen people in the streets, fighting for change. But now that you know the election has happened, there’s this concern among some that the momentum might go away. That change is supposedly here, and now we can get back to normal—and that healing looks like going back to normal. Is that a false healing?Barber: The people I’m around didn’t vote for normal, nor are they ready to go back to normal. Yes, people did stand up in the wake of [George] Floyd’s death and Breonna Taylor’s death. But I think we have to understand that in a larger context. It happened in the midst of COVID; it happened when people were home out of work; it happened on top of a whole lot of death, tracing all the way back to Tamir Rice. You have to ask yourself: What is it that caused such a movement in this moment, when we’ve seen people killed on camera before?I wrote a piece saying that George Floyd’s “I can't breathe” became shorthand for how a lot of people were feeling—that the weight of the pressures of the state that’s supposed to help you were actually on their necks. That people were saying “I can’t breathe,” with all this pressure of being forced to go to work without the protections they need. “I can’t breathe” is what most people were saying before they were dying from COVID in hospitals.The police represented the state, and the state is not supposed to kill you. It’s supposed to ensure life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The state is supposed to provide the establishment of justice and ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and guarantee equal protection under the law. People often say, “Well, this was the greatest, most diverse movement in the country,” but that’s not true. The abolition movement was diverse; the early labor movement was diverse. [This is] the greatest one we’ve seen in this moment that was filmed on camera. But also, people were in the streets for that reason and many others.The Poor People’s Campaign started with six weeks of direct action in 40-something states and the District of Columbia in 2018. The Women’s March, the Sunrise Movement, the Black Lives movement, the Fight for $15 movement—there is the sense in which there is a flooding of consciousness in the society. And what happens whenever you have an oppressive leader and oppressive accessories to the crime of oppression—like [Mitch] McConnell in the Senate, who just continued to press people down—eventually that pressing-down overflows. It spews out. People can’t take it anymore, and won’t take it.Harris: So it would become necessary for people to make the politicians feel uncomfortable.Barber: Right. It becomes necessary for your life. You have to at least stand up. The very dignity of life, the dignity of the soul, requires that you stand up right. That’s what happened to the slaves who would risk their lives and would die sometimes running from slavery—but they could no longer accept the slavery, right? They could no longer accept the slavery. It’s what happened when women could no longer accept not being able to vote. It’s what happened when labor people could no longer work—they could no longer accept not having fundamental rights. There’s a place in which Rosa Parks says, “I’m tired. I just can’t take this no more. It may not change everything. But I’m going to do this.” And we never know when the spark is going to ignite. But we do know that there’s this sense in which folk have to, if you will, stand up in various ways.The worst thing for people to think would be that folks just want to go back to normal.People understand that even after the election, 8 million more people have been added to the 140 million people in poverty and low-wealth [conditions]. Millions more people have lost their health care. There’s nothing normal about this situation.The Constitution doesn’t say “Just give half the people equal protection under the law.” That’s being centrist. It doesn’t say “Give half the people the establishment of justice.” It’s a requirement of the whole. So we don’t need this language that’s really more about people getting along on the surface, but not having a real healing. There can be no healing of the soul of America without healing the body.[Read: First comes police reform. Then comes everything else.]The body is sick. It’s sick with poverty. It’s sick with the denial of health care, where you have politicians who have the very health care they don’t want their constituents to have. It’s sick with cutting money for public education, which is key to our economic future—an educated society. It’s sick with all forms of racism and disparate treatment. And it’s a sickness that we have to keep working on, keep addressing—which is why I think one of the great geniuses of the Constitution is that the establishment of justice precedes ensuring domestic tranquility. It says: Establish justice, then ensure domestic tranquility. And then in order to keep the tranquility, you must provide for the common defense and promote the general welfare, in that order. You cannot have some kind of false peace.Harris: You’re saying we can’t just shake hands and pat each other on the back without addressing the underlying issues.Barber: It’s not even constitutional! Even if you don’t want to deal with it from a religious perspective—because you certainly can’t do it from a moral religious perspective. There’s no [part of] scripture that ever speaks to a peace that is with the absence of justice. Even in the Hebrew language, shalom is “peace.” But shalom is not just the absence of tension; it’s the presence of justice. And in the New Testament, Jesus never discussed some way of people being okay spiritually but still broken physically.In our movement, we constantly challenge folk. We say there are five areas: systemic racism, systemic poverty, ecological devastation and the denial of health care, the war economy, and the false moral narrative of religious nationalism. Those are five interlocking injustices that threaten the soul of this nation. And if you don’t heal them—work on them in the body—then the soul, the peace, the domestic tranquility, the promises of the nation, are always being undermined. And you cannot address any of those things without addressing concrete, real policies.People didn’t vote for “normal.” They didn’t vote for neoliberalism; they didn’t vote for trickle-down. They didn’t vote just to lift [people] from the middle class. People are hurting. And systemic racism and systemic poverty are the fissures that allow a pandemic to hold on in a society. If you’re in the aftermath of that, you cannot simply go look for normal, or suggest there’s some place behind us where everything was okay, where we were all united. That is not a truthful rendition of history. It is not a truthful remembrance. What we need to do is look for what [to do] together. And we need to heal from the bottom up.Harris: You mentioned that people weren’t just voting to go back to the past; they’re voting for the future. But then you also have more than 70 million Americans who voted for the current president. How do you heal across that line?Barber: First of all, it requires recognizing that America has always been a divided nation to some degree. And it has required the larger part of the division to want to move forward. And so you talk about the 72 million that voted [for Trump], for whatever reason. Not just for president; I think they voted for a way of life. They voted for a misguided vision of regression.There’s been so many resources put in over the years to keep us divided. Dr. King, in 1965, talked about that at the end of the Selma-to-Montgomery movement. He said every time there’s the possibility of poor whites and poor Blacks joining together to build political power, to bring into existence a beloved community, the aristocracy—the bourbon class—sowed division. He was describing the 1860s, but he was applying it to the 1960s and was saying that we have to know this history and how it continues. So that’s one thing: The division is intentional. It’s not new. It did not begin with Trump. And it is not Trump’s alone.[Read: The case for reparations]We can’t stop after the inauguration and just say, “All is well.” We can’t make the mistake that was made when President [Barack] Obama was elected. We must keep building these nonpartisan movements like the Poor People’s Campaign, which goes into so-called red states and red counties. And we build relationships. We show people that they are being fooled by those who invite them to participate in racist voter suppression, for instance—but then turn around and vote against their union rights, their health care. And we are winning—though not everybody. It is possible. Sixty-two percent of Republicans in one study said they want a raise in their wages. Two-thirds of Americans want health care and want to guarantee that pre-existing conditions are covered. That’s why this new administration must fight for those things. Because when people you know have been fed lies, if you show them the truth, you recognize a lot of them are not bad people. They’ve been fed bad information. They’ve been shown a bad way.I think that Biden and [Vice President–elect Kamala] Harris need to come south when they roll out the expansion plan for health care and for living wages, because many of those states are non-union states. Every time they do a policy, they need to have Democrats on the stage, Republicans on the stage, women on the stage, Black folks on the stage, Latinos on the stage, gay people on the stage. They need to show all the people this policy is going to impact, so that folks see a picture, not just hear numbers. Imagine Biden in Mississippi or Alabama laying out a health plan and showing how many thousands of people in Alabama—how many thousands of white people—would benefit from health care. We’ve got to have a political system that doesn’t give up on states and doesn’t write people off.
1 h
theatlantic.com
Marco Rubio is already suiting up for the politics of destruction
A galling instant pivot to attack mode after not acknowledging the election results.
1 h
washingtonpost.com
Did Leslie Van Houten Kill Anyone? Charles Manson Follower Denied Parole Over LaBianca Murders
California Gov. Gavin Newsom blocked the 71-year-old's release, saying Van Houten "currently poses an unreasonable danger to society if released from prison."
1 h
newsweek.com
Eric Schmidt Thinks This Is The Best Age To Start Measuring Excellence
Schmidt discusses a new initiative to find young leaders, criticism of the tech industry, and the future of AI.
1 h
time.com
Iran newspaper: Strike Haifa if Israel killed scientist
The assault should cause "heavy human casualties" the newspaper urges.
1 h
politico.com
National forests will let you cut your own Christmas tree
The US Forest Service wants you to leave the artificial tree in its box this year. Instead, it recommends, cut your own Christmas tree in a national forest -- a tradition that's good for the forest, too.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Millions of workers poised to lose access to paid leave as virus spikes
As many as 87 million public and private sector workers could lose access to the federally mandated benefit at the end of the year.
2 h
politico.com
Hillbilly Elegy Doesn’t Reflect the Appalachia I Know
GIRLS ON A PORCH IN the APPALACHIAn REGION OF OHIO. Rich-Joseph FacunMy Aunt Ruth won’t watch Hillbilly Elegy, the movie adaptation of J. D. Vance’s memoir about growing up in and eventually escaping Appalachia and a mother coping with addiction. Practically speaking, my aunt doesn’t have a Netflix account or any of the smart technology she’d need to stream it. But she also has no interest in watching a story of her community that doesn’t reflect what she sees and that she knows will be exploitative, harmful, and not helpful to moving her or her neighbors forward.Hillbilly Elegy doesn’t show the positive side of Appalachia that my aunt and I know, because that wouldn’t serve the story’s purposes. The film and book need Appalachia to be poor, broken, and dirty, because they depend on us believing that the mountains are somewhere we want Vance to escape. They need to frame poverty as a moral failing of individuals—as opposed to systems—because they have to imply that something about Vance’s character allowed him to get away from his hillbilly roots. Hillbilly Elegy has to simplify the people and problems of Appalachia, because it has decided to tell the same old pull-yourself-up-by-your-bootstraps narrative that so many of us reject.Owsley County, Kentucky, where my aunt lives, is not so different from Breathitt County, where Vance’s grandmother was born and where, in the book, he spent a lot of time. In fact, the two counties share a border. Nearly 40 percent of the population in Owsley County lives in poverty, and even before COVID-19, less than half of the town participated in the labor force. The Census Bureau currently estimates the average per capita income to be $17,766, and Owsley is often cited as one of the poorest counties in America.[Read: Hillbilly Elegy is one of the worst movies of the year]This poverty isn’t what Aunt Ruth sees when she looks at her community. She sees Melinda, a woman who has spent her life making sure needy children have access to nutritious food. She sees Eula, who almost single-handedly built a network of clinics to provide health care to the region. She sees Katie, who—despite having parents who struggled with addiction—earned a college scholarship and has spent her career as a nurse helping others.I see these attributes too, because when I was growing up in Appalachia, Ruth and the other women in my family taught me to see them. The creativity and ingenuity that exist in this part of the world. The way individuals come together to take care of one another, even when outside systems have not taken care of them. The beauty and hope that undergird the poverty.In many ways, the arc of my life looks like that of Vance, who eventually went to Yale. I was born in Appalachia to two college-age parents who brought me home from the hospital to a rented trailer. I grew up without a lot of resources and with a strong hillbilly accent. Despite my humble beginnings, I eventually earned three Ivy League degrees and am now a lawyer in Louisville.But I don’t think of Appalachia as somewhere I escaped. I see it as the place that shaped who I became. It taught me to value family, community, and generosity. I understand that I was given opportunities that others worked hard to build for me. I don’t think I am undeniably better off for leaving Appalachia. I recognize that although I gained many opportunities, I lost a great deal as well.A BARBER IN THE APPALACHIA REGION OF OHIO. RICH-JOSEPH FACUNI don’t have the same connection to land, community, and family as my relatives who stayed. My sense of identity and belonging is less anchored than that of many I know who have spent their whole life in the mountains. I am grateful that I had the chance to see the world, in part because it solidified my desire to return to Kentucky. But when I came home, I struggled to understand how I fit in to that which I had left behind.If you watch Hillbilly Elegy, remember that its portrayal of Appalachia is designed to elevate Vance above the community from which he came. Remember that it seeks to tell his story in a way that aligns with a simplistic rags-to-riches narrative. Think critically about how that narrative influences the way we are taught to think about poverty, progress, and identity.[Read: The original underclass]Most of all, remember that portrayals like Hillbilly Elegy have real consequences for people like my Aunt Ruth. She may not watch the movie, but she will still feel its effects—the judgment of her and her neighbors, the sense that Appalachia is not worth saving, the desire to let outsiders help Appalachia instead of giving these communities the resources they need to help themselves.The way we portray struggling communities—and the people who inhabit them—matters. Seek out the wealth of writers and artists who recognize the value in small mountain towns like Owsley County and those portrayed in Hillbilly Elegy. Take the time to see the good, hardworking, intelligent people who are striving to make their communities better. And maybe join my Aunt Ruth and don’t bother to watch this movie.
2 h
theatlantic.com
David Prowse 'Much More Than Darth Vader,' Says Mark Hamill As 'Star Wars' Fans Mourn Actor's Death
Fans and celebrities pay tribute to the English actor, best known for his role as the antagonist in the film series' original trilogy.
2 h
newsweek.com
Supreme Court reviews Trump plan to exclude undocumented immigrants in redistricting
President Trump wants the U.S. Supreme Court to allow exclusion of millions of undocumented immigrants from the official Census count used for congressional districting.
2 h
abcnews.go.com
All Blacks great Dan Carter on the importance of mental health
2 h
edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus Deaths, Joe Biden, Holiday Windows: Your Weekend Briefing
Here’s what you need to know about the week’s top stories.
2 h
nytimes.com
All-Blacks legend Dan Carter on mental health
All-Blacks legend Dan Carter talks to Amanda Davies around his participation in Movember and why awareness around mental health is so important to him.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
Ronna McDaniel urges Georgia Republicans to vote in Senate runoffs, not 'lose your faith'
Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel on Saturday urged Republican voters in Georgia to vote for the party’s Senate candidates in the January runoffs.
2 h
foxnews.com
Op-Ed: How Trump is laying the groundwork for violence and unrest during Biden's presidency
Trump's continuous attacks on American democracy could lead to four years of durable disorder, acts of violence that become so common we stop to notice but barely flinch.
2 h
latimes.com
Op-Ed: The relationship between Latinos and 'Latinx'? It's complicated
A study shows that only 3% of Latino adults use the label "Latinx," but the term has vocal supporters. The debate about names and identity among Latinos isn't new, especially in politics.
2 h
latimes.com
400+ early Cyber Monday deals you can shop now
If you missed out on some of the shopping from Friday's major sales, you're in luck! Quite a few retailers have kept the discounts going through the weekend, so you can still score big savings on the stuff you need.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
Progressives are pushing for a bold Biden agenda. They might have to work around Congress to do it.
As control in the Senate is in limbo, progressives are focusing on Biden's Cabinet appointments to make the most impact for their policies.        
2 h
usatoday.com
Steve Doocy: How Curious George, Wheaties and an Adam Sandler water bottle were at Thanksgiving 2020
The Grinch may have stolen Christmas, but COVID derailed Thanksgiving…for everybody.
2 h
foxnews.com
D.C.-area forecast: Still mild with sunshine today, gusty showers and storms tomorrow
Showers move in tonight, while some late-November warmth could fuel a few strong to severe storms tomorrow.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
Ditch the Electoral College? It's a bad plan — rural interests might never matter again.
If metro areas want something different from states such as Iowa, then voting in Iowa becomes essentially meaningless.        
2 h
usatoday.com
Foldable tech is finally here. Will you bend towards the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold or the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 5G?
Several foldable devices are now available, each featuring a stunning OLED touchscreen you can collapse or open, on demand, to suit your needs.       
2 h
usatoday.com
Abcarian: Looking for right-wingers banned from Twitter? Check out Parler. Or better yet, don't
After Trump lost and Twitter began enforcing its policy on disinformation, people have turned to Parler, which has no restrictions on falsehoods
2 h
latimes.com