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Iker Casillas se compra una casa en Madrid por 3 millones sin Sara Carbonero

Una semana después de que se conocieran las primeras palabras de Iker Casillas sobre la supuesta crisis con Sara Carbonero de la que se llevaba hablando semanas -algo que el exfutbolista negó a pesar de admitir que le hubiera gustado dedicarle más...
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Petri Dishes with Alexandra Petri (Oct. 27)
Humor columnist Alexandra Petri takes your questions on the news and political in(s)anity of the day.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Drew Barrymore makes a grave mistake, plus Anna Wintour’s single again and Saoirse Ronan had a sexy birthday
Today in celebrity news, there are psychic misreadings, media breakups and birthday sex.
nypost.com
KitchenAid cooking tools 40% off for Amazon flash sale
Your hunt for new kitchen tools is finally over now that KitchenAid is marking down some of its most popular products on Amazon. For the sale, you can save 40% on a variety of KitchenAid tools — including fry thermometers, mixing bowls and spatulas. The brand is known for its efficiency, quality and style. So...
nypost.com
Stream It Or Skip It: ‘The Queen’s Gambit’ On Netflix, Where A Young Chess Prodigy Deals With A Crippling Addiction
Anya Taylor-Joy stars as young chess prodigy Beth Harmon in the first screen adaptation of the 1983 novel.
nypost.com
Republican Violating Defense Policy with Military Uniform in Campaign Ads Infuriates Veterans
In the past five days, Republican Senate candidate Doug Collins, a Georgia congressman, has violated Defense Department policy at least two dozen times by improperly using photos of himself in uniform for campaign ads.
newsweek.com
Waukegan mayor urges calm from residents after police shooting of young Black couple
The couple were shot during a second traffic stop after allegedly fleeing an earlier one the same night.
foxnews.com
World Series 2020 Game 3 Live Stream: Time, Channel, How To Watch Dodgers Vs. Rays Live
Can the Dodgers go up 2-1?
nypost.com
Professor Mark Blyth on "The Takeout" - 10/23/20
Brown University political science professor Mark Blyth joins Major to discuss economics and the upcoming election on this week's episode of "The Takeout with Major Garrett."
cbsnews.com
Olivia Culpo debuts bangs, boyfriend Christian McCaffrey approves
"You didn't have to stunt on 'em like that!"
nypost.com
Mega Millions Drawing For 10/23/20, Friday Jackpot is $97 Million
The Mega Millions jackpot for 10/23/20 is $97 million, with a cash option worth $75.1 million. The drawing will take place at 11 p.m. ET on Friday.
newsweek.com
Dana White says Leon Edwards vs. Khamzat Chimaev a done deal
Khamzat Chimaev is getting his big-fight opportunity in the form of top UFC welterweight contender Leon Edwards.        Related StoriesMiranda Maverick: Liana Jojua made 'big mistake' with UFC 254 faceoff threatUFC 254 'Embedded,' No. 5: Khabib Nurmagomedov's weight cut amplifiesJon Anik motivated by terms of UFC contract: 'I have to earn that seat every show, not unlike a fighter' 
usatoday.com
First 'Murder Hornet' Nest In U.S. Is Found In Washington State
State entomologists found the nest in a tree near the Canadian border. They were led there by an Asian giant hornet to which they had attached a radio tracker. The state plans to eradicate the nest.
npr.org
Details emerge in line-of-duty death of South Carolina sheriff's deputy; 2 arrested
South Carolina police have released new information in the line-of-duty death of a sheriff’s deputy who was killed during a traffic stop earlier this week.
foxnews.com
Review: Tesvor S6 Smart Robot Vacuum—a Cleaning Companion in the 'New Normal'
The Tesvor S6 is a competitively priced smart vacuum that scoops up dirt, dust and hair with ease—a robot assistant to help with daily chores. But does it deserve a place inside your home?
newsweek.com
Trump and Biden pursue key voting blocs in Florida: Seniors and Latinos
Less than two weeks from Election Day, 3.6 million votes have been cast in Florida and both campaigns continue to court critical voting blocs: Latino voters and seniors.
cbsnews.com
Ariana Grande's 'Positions' shows the star taking over the White House
The new music video casts Grande as a stylish president of the US.
edition.cnn.com
This week on "Face the Nation," October 25, 2020
National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien, and FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb appear on Sunday's "Face the Nation"
cbsnews.com
How to choose the best Chase credit cards for cash back and travel rewards
The bank is known for its Chase Sapphire Preferred and Chase Freedom credit cards, but it has other excellent options as well.
edition.cnn.com
Delta has added 460 people to 'no-fly' list for refusing to wear masks
In a memo to employees on Thursday, Delta CEO Ed Bastian said the airline has a total of 460 people on its no-fly list.
foxnews.com
Pennsylvania court: Signature mismatches ballots must be accepted
The Trump campaign previously asked a federal district court judge to deem signature mismatches unconstitutional.
cbsnews.com
Joe Biden's Comments on Fracking in the Final Debate May Come Back to Haunt Him in Pennsylvania
Reactions of voters in critical battleground counties after last night's debate evoke those of fans at a heavyweight championship fight between a seasoned challenger poised to claim the title and a "laid back" title holder claiming victory by raising both arms over his head at the final bell.
newsweek.com
You can get $40 worth of household essentials for $30 at Amazon right now
This Amazon sale on household essentials will help you save $10 when you spend $40 or more—find out more.       
usatoday.com
Find scorching deals in Canadian Tire's Hot Sale
Save up to 70% off on tires, kitchen products, housewares and more during Canadian Tire's Hot Sale.
edition.cnn.com
One of our favorite cordless Dyson vacuums is $150 off right now
The Dyson V8 Absolute is one of our all-time favorite cordless vacuums, and right now, it's on sale for a major discount—see the details.       
usatoday.com
Illinois restaurants, bars remain open to defy governor’s closure orders
Some restaurants and bars in Illinois are promising to stay open despite threats from Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker to shut down establishments that don’t follow guidelines and closure orders. “It is very serious right now, folks, and if we need to close down restaurants or bars or take away their liquor licenses, take away their...
nypost.com
People with Down syndrome have 10 times the risk of death from Covid-19 as those without, study finds
People with Down syndrome have 10 times the risk of dying from Covid-19 and four times the risk of hospitalization compared to those without the disability, researchers reported Thursday.
edition.cnn.com
Is There Nudity in ‘After We Collided’? Here’s Why It’s Rated R
The steamy romance earned its rating in part from a memorable butt scene.
nypost.com
Which activities have the highest and lowest risk during the COVID-19 pandemic?
Scientists say 6-feet is not enough, develop system to help you make smart decisions about common activities       
usatoday.com
Jennifer Aniston urges followers not to vote for Kanye West
She dropped of her early-voting ballot, revealing she voted for Biden/Harris.
nypost.com
Joe Biden's Social Worker Daughter Also Has a Fashion Line
The Democratic presidential candidate mentioned his daughter during a key moment of Thursday night's debate. Here are some other facts about Biden's youngest child.
newsweek.com
Austin Police Released Boogalo Boi After He Allegedly Shot Up Burning Minneapolis Precinct
The officers released him and his friends without arresting them.
slate.com
Refugees like my ancestors are part of what made America great
Maya Rackoff writes on the Trump administration's shockingly low acceptance of refugees. As a descendant of refugees herself, Rackoff argues that accepting those fleeing war, hunger, and persecution is part of the fiber of America. Moreover, countless studies have shown that refugees improve the economy and GDP, among other things.
edition.cnn.com
Twelve Days for a Winning Campaign | Opinion
This debate is not the end of the campaign. There are still 12 days, including today and election day, in the vote-attracting phase alone.
newsweek.com
The Chicago 7 trial feels very real in 2020
In 1970, Daniel L. Greenberg and two friends immersed themselves in the transcript of the infamous trial of the Chicago 7, eventually becoming editors of a published edition. Greenberg offers three lessons America still has left to learn 50 years later and explains how Aaron Sorkin's recent feature film reveals some -- though not all -- of them for new generations.
edition.cnn.com
Ryan Reynolds Cancels Birthday Twin Emilia Clarke's Day This Year
"So sorry. I moved her birthday this year. It was feeling a little crowded for me," he wrote on Friday.
newsweek.com
Dr. Cameron Webb: Treating COVID patients, raising 2 kids and running in a close House race
Dr. Cameron Webb has two kids, teaches at the University of Virginia’s School of Medicine, plus he’s running for Congress – and he takes shifts at the hospital every other week, where many of his patients have been diagnosed with the coronavirus.
foxnews.com
Save big on these 9 vacuums and cleaning devices right now
Keeping your home tidy seems like a never-ending task — one that is only made more time-consuming by sub-par vacuum cleaners and mops that leave behind dirt, debris, and stains in their path. If you haven’t purchased a new vacuum cleaner in a while, you might be surprised at how adept modern designs are at...
nypost.com
Schumer slams GOP advancing Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation process so close to election
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer slams Republicans for advancing Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation process so close to election day.        
usatoday.com
The Number of Early Votes in Florida Has Already Surpassed the Total Number of Ballots Cast for Trump in 2016
With a little over a week left until Election Day, more than 4 million Florida voters have already cast their ballots during early voting.
newsweek.com
NBA is targeting start date of Dec. 22 for the 2020-21 season
With a targeted start date of Dec. 22, the next NBA season would include 72 games and finish before the Tokyo Summer Olympic Games.        
usatoday.com
US sanctions Russian government institution tied to malware
The US Treasury Department on Friday announced sanctions on a Russian government research institution linked to a malware system "designed specifically to target and manipulate industrial safety systems."
edition.cnn.com
Biden lays out plan to tackle coronavirus pandemic
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden Friday attacked the Trump administration's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Eight months into the crisis, Biden said the president "still doesn't have a plan, " adding "he's quit on you." (Oct. 23)       
usatoday.com
First murder hornet nest in US discovered in Washington
The Asian giant hornet home was found in a tree near a house in Whatcom County, Washington, the state’s agriculture department announced Friday.
nypost.com
Coronavirus FAQs: What's Up With Bubble Dining? Should You Hand Out Halloween Candy?
Answers to your COVID-19 questions about how to handle Halloween trick-or-treaters, whether it's safe to eat in a restaurant's outdoor bubble and if you can be infected through your ear canal.
npr.org
David Byrne’s ‘American Utopia’ Offers Optimistic Protest While Mixing New Music And Talking Heads Classics 
It would be easy to be cynical about Byrne's pragmatic optimism and sober protest, but honestly, it comes as a relief.
nypost.com
One Good Thing: Netflix’s The Queen’s Gambit makes chess mesmerizing. Really!
Anya Taylor-Joy is amazing in Netflix’s The Queen’s Gambit. | Phil Bray/Netflix The seven-episode miniseries shows why Anya Taylor-Joy is one of the most exciting actors working today. One Good Thing is Vox’s recommendations series. In each edition, we’ll tell you about something from the world of culture that we think you should check out. Chess shouldn’t be all that interesting to watch on screen, for probably obvious reasons. The game involves a lot of people sitting and staring at a board, moving pieces around in quiet contemplation. And unless you’re a major chess fan, the moves the players make won’t immediately make sense in the way a baseball player hitting a home run does. But something that is interesting to watch onscreen is a great actor playing a compelling character who has a lot going on in their mind. A close-up on the actor’s face as the wheels turn in the character’s head can be gripping because attempting to think your way out of a problem is something we all have experienced. So the smartest choice Scott Frank makes in adapting Walter Tevis’s 1983 novel The Queen’s Gambit into a seven-episode Netflix miniseries is to focus not on the chess but on his actors’ faces, particularly that of his star. As chess prodigy Beth Harmon, Anya Taylor-Joy gives one of my favorite performances in ages. And Frank shows an understated confidence in relying not on fancy camera tricks but on close-ups that watch the star’s slightly too-wide eyes flicker with recognition as she finds the move to trounce yet another challenger. The central conflict of the miniseries isn’t Beth vs. a world that keeps underestimating her, as it seems to be on its face. The central conflict is the viewer vs. Beth, as you try to find your way inside her rapidly whirring brain, and almost do, before she shuts you out again. Beth is an orphan in 1950s Kentucky, who discovers an abiding love of chess almost by accident, thanks to a gruff old janitor (Bill Camp) who works at the orphanage she is sent to after her mother dies in a car accident. (Isla Johnston plays Beth as an orphaned child before Taylor-Joy takes over the role when Beth turns 15.) But when Beth is adopted by a middle-aged couple in the early 1960s and encouraged by her adoptive mother (Marielle Heller) to pursue her chess hobby further, she rapidly starts climbing the ranks of the world’s best players. That’s kind of it, so far as the story goes. The Queen’s Gambit is an underdog narrative —nobody expects a woman to be good at chess! — meshed with a coming-of-age character study. How much of Beth’s motivation stems from the uncertainty of her childhood, of her adoption, of her bouncing from an orphanage to public school as a teenager? And how badly do the addictions that she develops to pills and alcohol, almost as part of her training, hinder her progress? Her traumas and her addictions must drive her on some level, but at no point does she monologue painfully and at length about how losing her mother pushed her to be better. She just has to be better because she has to be better. If she ever stopped and looked too closely at the reasons she behaves the way she does, she might completely fall apart. Taylor-Joy is one of my favorite performers working today, and she’s exceptional here. The best chess players in the world know when they’ve won or lost dozens of moves ahead of the game’s completion. Thus, chess very much is a game of faces, and Taylor-Joy’s cerebral acting meshes perfectly with Beth’s story. She’s an actor of micro-expressions, of flickers of eyes and twitches of lips, and what makes The Queen Gambit such a good fit for her is the way she keeps both the viewer and Beth’s opponents at arm’s length. Competition stories are often a great way to do character studies, especially when the competitions are one-on-one. Weirdly, the story I thought of most often while watching The Queen’s Gambit was Martin Scorsese’s 1980 film Raging Bull. The surface resemblance between the two is faint, but they’re both about self-destructive, preternaturally talented people who wrestle with the gendered expectations of the society they exist in, with top-notch performances from actors at the height of their craft. I spent most of The Queen’s Gambit nervous that the miniseries was going to become a story about Beth having to learn how to be a woman or something because she has turned off so much of herself to focus on being great at chess. But Frank’s scripts focus not on something so clichéd but on Beth stubbornly hammering at her own humanity until it fits the peculiar circumstances of her existence. The series is about how the mere fact of her being a woman causes other players to underestimate her, but only on its margins. By the time she’s credibly competing for the US championship, everybody takes her seriously. The Queen’s Gambit is not a story about a woman overcoming the odds to show the world her girl power; it’s a story about a woman overcoming the odds to understand herself. (And lest I leave the impression the series is all Taylor-Joy, the entire cast of the miniseries is perfect.) It’s also a miniseries about chess, one that slowly but surely teaches you important truths about the game, so that by the time Beth is playing the much-vaunted Soviet chess players, you get the gist of the games, even if you don’t grasp each and every nuance. You’ll understand just why it’s advantageous to play white instead of black, but you’ll also understand how the built-in disadvantage black holds reflects some of the ways Beth sees herself, even if she would never say that. Another movie I thought of while watching The Queen’s Gambit was Mike Leigh’s terrific 2008 comedy Happy-Go-Lucky. What I love about that movie is that its central character — an extraordinarily kind and, well, happy-go-lucky woman — doesn’t undergo some awkward character arc in which she realizes the world is darker and more cynical than she expected. Instead, she forces the world to realize the viability of her point of view. The Queen’s Gambit has flaws. It’s maybe a little too long. Frank is perhaps slightly too enamored of watching his star cavort around in her underwear. And the series’ one major character of color (Beth’s Black best friend Jolene, played wonderfully by Moses Ingram) is a thankless role. But The Queen’s Gambit also has a healthy dose of Happy-Go-Lucky-ness at its core, in a way that almost makes it a mirror image of that film. Beth Harmon forces the world to reckon first with her talent and then with her pain. The world bends around her in turn, without pressuring her to be anything she’s not. Sometimes, that’s enough. The Queen’s Gambit is streaming on Netflix. Will you help keep Vox free for all? The United States is in the middle of one of the most consequential presidential elections of our lifetimes. It’s essential that all Americans are able to access clear, concise information on what the outcome of the election could mean for their lives, and the lives of their families and communities. That is our mission at Vox. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone understand this presidential election: Contribute today from as little as $3.
vox.com
Drew Barrymore reprises ‘Scream’ role to see if Casey Becker would survive in 2020
Would Casey Becker of "Scream" survive in modern times?
foxnews.com
Analysis: Why Trump resonates with some Black men
It's one of those seemingly hard-to-explain things: President Donald Trump holds an allure for some Black men, despite his history of denigrating Black Americans and his refusal to explicitly acknowledge systemic racism.
edition.cnn.com