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Los sindicatos educativos no descartan una huelga en Baleares en función de las negociaciones con el Govern

Los sindicatos educativos han asegurado este miércoles que no descartan la posibilidad de una huelga de profesorado en Baleares en función de cómo avancen las negociaciones con el Govern para el inicio del curso 2020-2021 ante la crisis sanitaria derivada del coronavirus.
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Police find body in car after morning shooting
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MLB condemns Justin Turner, launches probe into COVID-19 defiance
Justin Turner’s decision to celebrate on the field after the Dodgers clinched the World Series despite having learned during the game he’d tested positive for COVID-19 could cost the third baseman. MLB announced Wednesday the commissioner’s office had begun a full investigation into Turner’s actions after he “chose to disregard the agreed-upon joint protocols and...
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How Detroit Lions' trade for Everson Griffen went down: 'Motown we coming, baby!'
Coming from the Dallas Cowboys, Everson Griffen must pass COVID-19 tests on five consecutive days before joining Detroit Lions for team activities        
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usatoday.com
Scientists create world’s whitest paint – and it could combat global warming
US scientists have created the world’s whitest shade of white paint — and it could help combat global warming, the researchers claim. Engineers at Purdue University in Indiana developed an ultra-white paint they say reflects 95.5 percent of sunlight to keep surfaces up to 18 degrees Fahrenheit cooler than their surroundings. The team hopes the...
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Private eye busted in Chinese government plot is an ex-NYPD sergeant
A former NYPD sergeant is the private eye busted in a Chinese government plot known as “Operation Fox Hunt,” according to his online resume. Michael McMahon, 53, is accused of participating in a multi-year scheme to “threaten, harass, surveil and intimidate” a former Chinese government official living in New Jersey into returning to China to...
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Biden focuses on pandemic while Trump plans string of campaign rallies
Joe Biden is focusing in on the pandemic, while President Trump is campaigning in Arizona today. CBS News White House correspondent Paula Reid joined CBSN with an update on the final days on the campaign trail.
cbsnews.com
Germany imposes month-long lockdown after COVID-19 spike
Germany will be plunged back into lockdown with restaurants, bars and theaters closed for a month to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19, officials announced Wednesday. Chancellor Angela Merkel and the country’s 16 state governors said the partial shutdown will go into force Monday, saying it’s needed after a recent surge in new infections. “We...
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Miles Taylor Admits He Was 'Anonymous' White House Official Behind New York Times 'Resistance' Op-ed
Miles Taylor, chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security under Kirstjen Nielsen, revealed Wednesday that he was the anonymous "senior" white house official who authored a critical op-ed of President Donald Trump.
breitbart.com
This Rotating Samsung Sero QLED TV is $500 Off — Today Only!
Yes, we said rotating. (Really!)
nypost.com
Hillary Clinton to vote as member of New York’s Electoral College
The former New York senator won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College to Trump in 2016, and supports abolishing the institution.
nypost.com
Read Miles Taylor's statement on being the 'Anonymous' op-ed writer
Miles Taylor, the former chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security, has come forward as the anonymous senior Trump administration official who wrote a 2018 New York Times op-ed and a subsequent book critical of President Donald Trump. Read his full statement below:
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Browns push back hard on ‘insensitive’ Odell Beckham narrative
Cleveland Browns head coach Kevin Stefanski and stars Baker Mayfield and Jarvis Landry are strongly pushing back on suggestions their offense will be “better off” without seriously injured wideout Odell Beckham Jr. Stefanski said Wednesday that he’s been “sick” about losing Beckham since the former Giants star suffered a torn ACL in his left knee...
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Twitter’s threats to The Post echo those of authoritarian states — and the media shrugs
Big Tech executives were forced to defend themselves and their platforms in a contentious Senate hearing on Wednesday — with most of the passion relating to the suppression of this newspaper’s Twitter feed over the past two weeks. Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey explained with an eerie calm that The Post can regain access to its...
nypost.com
Media Fail to Ask Joe Biden About Secret Family Business Deal with Chinese Company
Journalists failed to ask Vice President Joe Biden Wednesday about the latest revelations that he met with businessman Tony Bobulinksi to discuss a business deal between a Chinese energy company and members of his family, including his son, Hunter Biden.
breitbart.com
Republicans Blast Social Media C.E.O.s While Democrats Deride Hearing
Republican senators accused the leaders of Twitter, Facebook and Google of censorship. Democrats denounced that as posturing.
nytimes.com
Watch: Miles Taylor Denies Being 'Anonymous' in August CNN Appearance -- 'I Wear a Mask for Two Things ... Halloween and Pandemics'
On Wednesday, former Department of Homeland Security official Miles Taylor revealed himself to be "Anonymous," the author of a New York Times op-ed and a subsequent book critical of President Donald Trump.
breitbart.com
Joe Biden offers decency in turbulent times
In his new Joe Biden biography, New Yorker writer Evan Osnos says Biden hopes to find common ground; but is prepared to go scorched earth if needed.
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6 reasons you should consider getting the Chase Sapphire Preferred credit card now
The Chase Sapphire Preferred is offering the highest sign-up bonus we've ever seen on this card, but that's just one reason to get it.
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Listen to the Modern Love Podcast
When it comes to forbidden love, a “romantic plan isn’t enough.”
nytimes.com
Biden draws contrast with Trump on coronavirus as pandemic worsens in campaign's final days
Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sought Wednesday to make the differences in how he and President Donald Trump have approached the coronavirus pandemic a part of his closing message, sitting for a briefing with health experts and addressing the crisis as Trump campaigned out West as if it was over.
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CNN Poll: Biden continues to hold nationwide advantage in final days of 2020 race
With the race for the presidency approaching its end amid a raging pandemic, Democratic nominee Joe Biden maintains a substantial lead over President Donald Trump nationwide, according to a new CNN Poll conducted by SSRS.
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Brandon Girtz explains drop to featherweight for Bellator 250: 'It's a bunch of new blood'
Brandon Girtz is ready to test the featherweight division's new blood.        Related StoriesBrandon Girtz explains drop to featherweight for Bellator 250: 'It's a bunch of new blood' - EnclosureBellator 250 predictions: Will Mousasi reign again, or can Lima become a dual champ?Bellator 250 predictions: Will Mousasi reign again, or can Lima become a dual champ? - Enclosure 
usatoday.com
Jared Kushner deserves an Emmy Award
The category, writes Elliot Williams, after the President's son-in-law's interview with Fox News, would be: "Excellence in Cramming an Unprecedented Number of Half-truths, Dog Whistles and Red Herrings About Race Into One Sixty-Second Soliloquy (Morning TV News)"-- tossed off comments meant to list Trump accomplishments that were ignorant, deceitful and insulting to Black people at the same time.
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4 burning questions heading into Bellator 250
MMA Junkie's Simon Head takes a look at the storylines to follow ahead of Bellator 250 in Uncasville, Conn.       Related StoriesVideo: Bellator 250 faceoff highlightsBellator 250 pre-event facts: Douglas Lima looks to make more historyBellator 250: Make your predictions for Douglas Lima vs. Gegard Mousasi 
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Daylight saving time ends Sunday: 8 things to know about “falling back”
It’s that time of year again. | Muhammad Firdaus Khaled/EyeEm/Getty Images We turn our clocks back at 2 am Sunday. Here’s why. On Sunday, November 1, at 2 am, daylight saving time ends. We’ll set our clocks back one hour, heralding the end of daylight saving time for much of the country. The biggest consequence: The change shifts daylight back into the morning hours. That means sunrise will happen one hour earlier on November 1 (sadly, it means sunset will occur one hour earlier as well.) For weekend workers, at least, it means an additional glorious hour of sleep on Sunday. Hurrah! Yet as simple as it seems, there is still a lot of confusion about daylight saving time. The first thing to know: Yes, it ends in the fall, just as the decrease in daylight hours is becoming noticeable. Let’s sort it all out. 1) Why do we need to “save” daylight hours in the summer? Daylight saving time in the US started as an energy conservation trick during World War I and became a national standard in the 1960s. The idea is that in the summer months, we shift the number of daylight hours we get into the evening. So if the sun sets at 8 pm instead of 7, we’d presumably spend less time with the lights on in our homes at night, saving electricity. It also means that you’re less likely to sleep through daylight hours in the morning (since those are shifted an hour later too). Hence “saving” daylight hours for the most productive time of the day. Overall: We agree, the name is kind of confusing. 2) Isn’t it “daylight savings time” not “daylight saving time”? No, it’s definitely called “daylight saving time.” Not plural. Be sure to point out this common mistake to friends and acquaintances. You’ll be really popular. 3) Does it actually lead to energy savings? As Joseph Stromberg outlined in an excellent 2015 Vox article, the actual electricity conservation from the time change is unclear or nonexistent: Despite the fact that daylight saving time was introduced to save fuel, there isn’t strong evidence that the current system actually reduces energy use — or that making it year-round would do so, either. Studies that evaluate the energy impact of DST are mixed. It seems to reduce lighting use (and thus electricity consumption) slightly but may increase heating and AC use, as well as gas consumption. It’s probably fair to say that energy-wise, it’s a wash. 4) Why doesn’t Arizona or Hawaii change its clocks? Arizona has a simple way to deal with daylight saving time: Most of the state ignores it. Fifty years ago, the state legislature opted to keep the clocks in most of the state in standard time all year. One reason: Arizona summers are very hot, and an earlier sunset gives residents more time to enjoy tolerable temperatures before bed, as AZcentral explains. Confusing matters: The Navajo Nation within Arizona does use DST. Hawaii also doesn’t observe DST. The island state is the farthest south of all states and rejected it because it doesn’t see a hugely noticeable daylight hour difference between winter and summer months. 5) Didn’t a bunch of states pass laws making daylight saving time permanent? What happened with those? If you’re a bit confused about which states follow daylight saving time and which do not, I don’t blame you. That’s because lately, a few states have looked into joining Arizona and Hawaii, but with a twist: They want daylight saving time to be in place all year long. In the November 2018 election, Californians voted in favor of a ballot measure that paves the way for this. The measure, which passed with 60 percent of the vote, simply grants the California Legislature the power to vote to change the clocks permanently. Any changes would need to start with a two-thirds majority vote in the state legislature — which hasn’t happened yet. And even then, the time change wouldn’t be a given. The federal government would have to approve it; that has uncertain prospects too. In 2018, the Florida government approved the delightfully named Sunshine Protection Act, which seeks to permanently leave Florida in daylight saving time. (Essentially, it would mean that Florida will be one hour ahead of the rest of the East Coast during the winter months.) Massachusetts has looked into a similar measure, too. The bill is still waiting on approval from Congress before it can go into effect. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has put forth a few bills to push forward the approval, but they haven’t moved at all. Arkansas, too, passed a bill to make daylight saving time permanent, but it included the condition that the changes wouldn’t go into effect until its bordering states changed their clocks permanently too. Other states that have approved legislation to enact year-long daylight saving time include Washington, Tennessee, Oregon, Nevada, and Alabama. Some Maryland legislators are interested, too. But none of the changes can go into effect without approval from the federal government. So for now, all these states will be changing their clocks on Sunday along with the rest of us. Sorry! (It appears other countries are also interested in getting rid of DST, or keeping it in place forever: Some members of the European Parliament, the governing body of the European Union, want to abolish clock changes there too.) 6) What would happen if daylight saving time were abolished? Or if it were extended forever? It’s worth thinking about what would happen if Congress abolished daylight saving time (or kept it going all year long). How might our patterns change? Blogger and cartographer Andy Woodruff decided to visualize thiswith a great series of maps. The goal of these maps is to show how abolishing daylight saving time, extending it all year, or going with the status quo changes the number of days we have “reasonable” sunrise and sunset times. Reasonable, as defined by Woodruff, is the sun rising at 7 am or earlier or setting after 5 pm (so one could, conceivably, spend some time in the sun before or after work). This is what the map looks like under the status quo of twice-yearly clock shifts. A lot of people have unreasonable sunrise times (the dark spots) for much of the year: Andy Woodruff Here’s how things would change if daylight saving were abolished (that is, if we just stuck to the time set in the winter all year). It’s better, particularly on the sunrise end: Andy Woodruff And here’s what would happen if daylight saving were always in effect. The sunrise situation would actually be worse for most people. But many more people would enjoy after-work light — and there’s a strong argument to make that this after-work light is actually worth more. (More on that below.) Andy Woodruff (Note: The length of light we experience each day wouldn’t actually change; that’s determined by the tilt of Earth’s axis. But we would experience it in times more accommodating for our modern world. Be sure to check out the interactive version of these maps on Woodruff’s website.) In 2015, Stromberg made the compelling case that the daylight saving time shift into the evening should be extended year-round. Having more light later could benefit us in a surprising number of ways: People engage in more leisure activities after work than beforehand, so we’d likely do more physical activity over sedentary leisure activities. Relatedly, studies show that kids get more exercise when the sun is out later in the evening. Stromberg also cites some evidence that robberies decrease when there’s more sun in the evening hours. There could be economic gains, since people “take short trips, and buy things after work — but not before — so a longer DST slightly increases sales,” he writes. 7) Is daylight saving time dangerous? A bit. When we shift clocks forward one hour in the spring, many of us will lose that hour of sleep. In the days after daylight saving time starts, our biological clocks are a little bit off. It’s like the whole country has been given one hour of jet lag. In September, the American Academy of Sleep medicine called for the end of daylight saving time clock changes. “An abundance of accumulated evidence indicates that the acute transition from standard time to daylight saving time incurs significant public health and safety risks, including increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, mood disorders, and motor vehicle crashes,” the academy wrote in a statement. One hour of lost sleep sounds like a small change, but we humans are fragile, sensitive animals. Small disruptions in our sleep have been shown to alter basic indicators of our health and dull our mental edge. And when our biological clocks are off, everything about us is out of sync. Our bodies run this tight schedule to try to keep up with our actions. Since we usually eat a meal after waking up, we produce the most insulin in the morning. We’re primed to metabolize breakfast before even taking a bite. It’s more efficient that way. (There’s some good research that finds taking over-the-counter melatonin can help reset our body clocks to a new time. Read more about that here.) Being an hour off schedule means our bodies are not prepared for our actions at any time of the day. One example: driving. In 1999, researchers at Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities wanted to find out what happens on the road when millions of drivers have their sleep disrupted. Analyzing 21 years of fatal car crash data from the US National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, they found a very small, but significant, increase in road deaths on the Monday after the clock shift in the spring: The number of deadly accidents jumped to an average of 83.5 on the “spring forward” Monday compared with an average of 78.2 on a typical Monday. And it seems it’s not just car accidents. Evidence has also mounted of an increase in incidences of workplace injuries and heart attacks in the days after we spring forward. 8) How can we abolish daylight saving time, or extend it year-round? That’s easy! Well, not really: All it would take is an act of Congress. But I wouldn’t count on this happening anytime soon. Help keep Vox free for all Millions turn to Vox each month to understand what’s happening in the news, from the coronavirus crisis to a racial reckoning to what is, quite possibly, the most consequential presidential election of our lifetimes. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. But our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources. Even when the economy and the news advertising market recovers, your support will be a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. If you have already contributed, thank you. If you haven’t, please consider helping everyone make sense of an increasingly chaotic world: Contribute today from as little as $3.
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L.A. Times' Sam Farmer predicts Falcons-Panthers winner on Thursday football
L.A. Times' Sam Farmer predicts Falcons-Panthers winner on Thursday football.
latimes.com
Dentists warning against TikTok trend where users glue fake fangs to their teeth
This TikTok trend has people biting off more than they can chew.
foxnews.com
Powerball Drawing For 10/28/20, Wednesday Jackpot is $116 Million
The Powerball jackpot for 10/28/20 is $116 million, with a cash option worth $89.5 million. The drawing will be held at 11 p.m. ET on Wednesday.
newsweek.com
Is Spotify Defending Joe Rogan and Alex Jones? Read Their Explanation Following Controversial Podcast
In a leaked email, a top Spotify executive defended the conspiracy theorist's appearance on the popular show.
newsweek.com
Philly police union head says cops had ‘no choice’ but to shoot Walter Wallace
The head of Philadelphia’s police union said Wednesday that cops had “no choice” but to shoot the knife-wielding black man whose death by police has sparked widespread unrest in the Pennsylvania city. John McNesby, president of the Fraternal Police Order of Lodge 5, told a local radio show host that 27-year-old Walter Wallace “was a...
nypost.com
New Poll Shows Trump Trailing Biden in Georgia, a Republican Stronghold for Nearly Three Decades
Biden's campaign is building up steam in Georgia, a state where the GOP holds every statewide office.
newsweek.com
Watch Live: Kamala Harris Stumps in Tucson, Arizona
Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) is stumping in Arizona on Wednesday, speaking at a drive-in rally in Tucson to encourage supporters to get out and vote early.
breitbart.com
Dodgers fans cheer after long World Series drought
Fans jubilant over the Dodgers' World Series win danced in the streets and set off fireworks across Los Angeles. The win ended a 32-year World Series drought after a COVID-shortened season with the Dodgers beating the Tampa Bay Rays 3-1. (Oct. 28)       
usatoday.com
Two of Europe's biggest economies announce partial lockdowns
Two of Europe's biggest economies announced partial lockdowns on Wednesday in response to spiraling case numbers in both countries.
edition.cnn.com
Everything coming to and leaving Hulu in November 2020
October is coming to a close and the Thanksgiving season is officially upon us as Hulu changes out its library to accommodate TV and movie binge-watchers’ holiday plans.
foxnews.com
‘Anonymous’ is former DHS official Miles Taylor
Former Department of Homeland Security official Miles Taylor on Wednesday revealed himself as “Anonymous,” the author of an op-ed vowing resistance to President Trump. Taylor boasted in September 2018 of “working diligently from within to frustrate parts of [Trump’s] agenda and his worst inclinations” and last year wrote the book “A Warning.” Washington gossip for...
nypost.com
Trump Fans Freeze in Pandemic Hotspot as Re-Election Rallies Continue to Be a Good Place to Risk Death
Don’t worry, though, your hospital bed shortage won’t affect Mike Pence.
slate.com
In blue Northern Va., Democrats eye a mayoral seat long held by the GOP
Manassas Mayor Harry J. Parrish (R) is not seeking reelection and Democrats hope to win the seat for the first time in the city’s history.
washingtonpost.com
McCloskeys return to court, ask judge to disqualify prosecutor for alleged political bias
A St. Louis couple charged with unlawful use of a weapon during a confrontation with protesters over the summer returned to court on Wednesday asking a judge to disqualify the city's top prosecutor from the case because of her alleged political motivation.  
foxnews.com
Jack Dorsey testifies that Twitter does not have the ability to influence elections during Senate hearing
The claim came during testy questioning from Sen. Ted Cruz during a hearing in which Dorsey appeared with the CEOs of Facebook and Google.       
usatoday.com
10 Trump books that offer a peek inside the White House
Here are 10 of the most revelatory titles from ex-administration officials, intelligence agents and former insiders about President Donald Trump.        
usatoday.com
Identity of anonymous Trump admin. official revealed
The identity of the anonymous Trump administration official, who wrote an op-ed and book critical of President Donald Trump, has been revealed to be Miles Taylor. Taylor is the former chief of staff to former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.
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12-year-old Ukrainian tourist loses arm in rare shark attack in Egypt 
A 12-year-old tourist from Ukraine lost an arm and his guide a leg in a rare shark attack in Egypt, officials said. The boy and his mother were snorkeling with their tour guide Sunday when they encountered a 6-foot Oceanic Whitetip Shark in a marine reserve near the Red Sea Resort of Sharm El-Sheikh, the...
nypost.com
Amazon takes up to 30 percent off Anker chargers, power banks and more
Your search for the perfect charger will be over now that Amazon is rolling out some major Anker deals. For the sale, Amazon is taking up to 30% of a variety of Anker accessories — including charger cables and power banks. All of the devices are highly rated and praised for their portability and lightning...
nypost.com
France imposes new national lockdown as Covid-19 cases spike
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The COVID-19 Pandemic Has Been Tough on Shopping Malls. History Suggests We Should Be Wary of What Might Replace Them
As COVID-19 tears through the social fabric of the U.S., shopping is becoming increasingly uncoupled from urban space
time.com
From Encyclopedias to Telephone Books, How Alphabetization Took Over the Modern World
Alphabetical order became invisible because it was so routine
time.com
MLB investigating Justin Turner returning to field after positive coronavirus test
MLB says Justin Turner 'emphatically refused to comply' with league security when he returned to the field after testing positive for the coronavirus.
latimes.com