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Trump desafía a la ONU al pedir recuperar todas las sanciones contra Irán

El presidente Donald Trump aseguró este miércoles que Estados Unidos solicitará que la Organización de Naciones Unidas (ONU) reimponga todas las sanciones a Irán. Este movimiento es su manera de responder a la humillante derrota que el pasado viernes...
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Leer artículo completo sobre: lavanguardia.com
Proud Boys Among Hundreds at Protest Supporting Staten Island 'Autonomous Zone' Violating COVID Restrictions
Mac's Public House has been attempting to skirt pandemic restriction laws by serving food and alcohol inside for free.
newsweek.com
NFL Week 13 power rankings: Steelers still No. 1 after Wednesday win
The Steelers held off the Ravens in a game delayed three times to remain ahead of the Chiefs and Saints at the top of the list.
washingtonpost.com
5 Key Takeaways from Trump's 46-minute Video Rant
The president persists with his claims of widespread fraud and irregularities, despite knockbacks undermining his allegations.
newsweek.com
For churchgoers during the Covid-19 pandemic, a deadly lesson from the 1918 flu
During the 1918 flu pandemic, some religious institutions closed for safety while others rebelled and saw the consequences. Here's what we can learn from their struggles.
edition.cnn.com
The Lincoln Project Targets Mitch McConnell, Trump in Latest Ads: 'This Is Not Normal'
One of the anti-Trump PAC ads described the Georgia Senate run-off in January as a vote on Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell.
newsweek.com
Putin Won't Congratulate Biden Until All Legal Procedures Are Finished, Russian Ambassador Says
Putin is now the only major world leader not to have congratulated Joe Biden on his victory over President Donald Trump.
newsweek.com
'I'm 12. Next Year I'm Studying Aerospace Engineering at University in Georgia'
Hopefully I will graduate with a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering at 14. I want to do my masters, an internship with Elon Musk, get my PhD and then go on to work at NASA or SpaceX.
newsweek.com
US states will make decisions about Covid-19 vaccines based on their own circumstances, former FDA chief says
edition.cnn.com
The US reports 3,100 coronavirus deaths in one day -- 20% more than previous record
edition.cnn.com
Extreme fire danger in Southern California
An extremely strong Santa Ana wind event is developing in Southern California, which could lead to explosive wildfire growth in the region. CNN Meteorologist Derek Van Dam has the details.
edition.cnn.com
Wind-whipped brush fire threatens homes in Orange County
A wind-whipped wildfire was threatening homes in Orange County's mountain communities, prompting evacuations and warnings that the fire could rapidly spread.
latimes.com
Russell Westbrook Trade Grades: Who Are the Winners of the Deal?
Westbrook's spell in Houston came to an end after just one season after the Rockets traded him to Washington for John Wall and a protected first-round pick.
newsweek.com
Coronavirus updates: CDC director warns of 450K deaths by February; California again breaks daily case record; 48 NBA players test positive
NBA says 48 players have tested positive for virus. Hawaii couple arrested for traveling after positive COVID test. 273K U.S. deaths. Latest news.        
usatoday.com
For Trump supporters primed to disbelieve defeat, challenging the election was a civic duty
In lawsuits to overturn the election, Trump supporters described what they saw, heard and suspected. Many of their allegations crumbled under scrutiny.       
usatoday.com
Sarah Fuller made history. Her parents understand why her moment matters.
Sarah Fuller became the first woman to appear in a Power Five football game. The moment was not lost on her parents.
washingtonpost.com
Attorney Encouraged Florida Republicans to Register to Vote in Georgia for Senate Run-Offs
Two run-off elections in Georgia will decided control of the Senate and are seen as crucial to Republicans.
newsweek.com
Can Mick Schumacher emulate his father Michael in Formula One?
Announced as one of two new drivers for American team Haas for the 2021 campaign, is Mick Schumacher good enough to compete in F1?
edition.cnn.com
Can Mick Schumacher emulate his father Michael in Formula One?
Towards the end of 2019 the pressure on Mick Schumacher was intense.
edition.cnn.com
Can Mick Schumacher emulate his father Michael in F1?
edition.cnn.com
Trump administration issues travel curbs for Chinese Communist Party members: report
The Trump administration on Wednesday issued new rules to restrict travel by Chinese Communist Party (CCP) members and their families, according to a report. 
foxnews.com
Bernie Sanders Calls for 'Unprecedented' Response to COVID Crisis as Biden Forms Top Team
The Vermont senator also called on the president-elect to adopt a laundry list of progressive policies in his first 100 days.
newsweek.com
Hostile M&A Can Get Pricey in a Rising Market
BC Partners-backed GardaWorld may not have had the last word with its “final” offer for G4S. It should’ve stitched up a deal sooner.
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washingtonpost.com
6 people missing after Alaska landslides, at least 4 homes destroyed
Six people are missing and at least four houses have been destroyed after a series of landslides hit Haines, Alaska, Wednesday afternoon, authorities said.
2 h
abcnews.go.com
911 emergency medical system in US 'at a breaking point,' ambulance group says
With the Covid-19 surge straining America's health care system, the 911 emergency call system has been stretched to "the breaking point," the American Ambulance Association says.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
6 missing, homes destroyed in southeast Alaska landslide
AAlaska authorities say it’s believed six people are missing and four homes have been destroyed after multiple mudslides were reported in the community of Haines on Wednesday
2 h
abcnews.go.com
Gloria Estefan reveals she had coronavirus, speculates she could have gotten it from a fan
Gloria Estefan says she contracted coronavirus after leaving her home only once to eat outdoors at a Miami restaurant.
2 h
foxnews.com
Chuck DeVore: Hewlett Packard packs up -- Will California ever get fed up with losing to Texas?
If California’s anti-jobs policies, its high taxes and more can chase out the company that launched Silicon Valley, is any business immune from pressure to move?
2 h
foxnews.com
Loeffler’s bogus claim that Warnock ‘celebrated anti-American hatred’
An attack ad in the Georgia Senate run-off relies on out-of-context video clips to make its case.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
Why Barr’s break with Trump could be a turning point
On Tuesday, a very high-profile Republican, Bill Barr, essentially agreed with what the media have been saying about the lack of widespread fraud.
2 h
foxnews.com
Why Your House Price Might Keep Going Up
This isn’t the first boom in property prices the country has seen before. It certainly won’t be the last.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
Why the Aussie Is Booming Amid a Trade Spat With China
Despite strained diplomatic ties, Australia’s relationship with its biggest trading partner is only set to strengthen.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
Miley Cyrus says her relationship with Liam Hemsworth had 'too much conflict'
Miley Cyrus opened up about her eight-month marriage to Liam Hemsworth, explaining that there was "too much conflict" between them.
2 h
foxnews.com
Kansas mayor charged with felony perjury: report
A mayor in Kansas was arrested and charged with perjury on Wednesday, court documents show, according to reports.
2 h
foxnews.com
A couple was arrested after allegedly traveling to Hawaii knowing they tested positive for Covid-19
A couple from Hawaii was arrested over the weekend after allegedly flying home knowing that they both had tested positive for Covid-19.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
China Says Its Moon Probe Is Preparing to Return Rock Samples to Earth
The Chang’e 5, the third Chinese probe to land on the moon, is the latest in a series of ambitious missions for Beijing’s space program.
2 h
time.com
LA mayor issues new stay-at-home order amid COVID-19 spike
Los Angeles on Wednesday night issued an emergency order directing all city residents to stay home amid a surge in coronavirus cases. Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the new restrictions at a press briefing, where he said, “It’s time to cancel everything.” Residents are still permitted to leave their homes for certain essential services, including for...
3 h
nypost.com
Dubai community keeps founder's business alive
Irish Perez is the founder of Instorya, a Dubai-based company that prints and delivers photo books. In 2019, Perez joined a Filipino business owners' support group, which has helped her stay afloat during the Covid-19 pandemic.
3 h
edition.cnn.com
Alaskan teen suspected of fatally shooting family after release from jail
An Alaskan teenager is being accused of shooting four relatives on Monday — just a week after being released from jail on charges of alleged family assault, according to a report. Malachi Maxon is accused of first shooting his 18-year-old cousin, Cody Roehl, at home near Wasilla, Alaska around 3 p.m. Authorities were tipped off...
3 h
nypost.com
NBC's Cris Collinsworth 'blown away' that Pittsburgh's women understand football
NBC color commentator Cris Collinsworth, known for his analysis during the network's NFL broadcasts, drew backlash on social media Wednesday for remarks that some deemed as sexist.
3 h
foxnews.com
A Month on From Election, 5 Questions About Concession, Transition and Inauguration
President Donald Trump continues to rail against the election outcome despite having failed so far to prove his allegations of widespread fraud facilitating Joe Biden's success.
3 h
newsweek.com
Clinton, Bush, Obama willing to take COVID-19 vaccine live on TV
America’s three most recent former presidents have reportedly all said they would publicly take a COVID-19 vaccine once one is approved to help promote the drug’s safety. Former Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton told CNN of their intentions — while former President Barack Obama said in an interview set to air Thursday he...
4 h
nypost.com
WWII veteran, at 101, recalls Pearl Harbor attack
The pandemic is preventing Pearl Harbor survivors from attending an annual ceremony remembering victims in the Dec. 7, 1941 attack. WWII veteran Mickey Ganitch, 101, has attended before, but will mark the anniversary this year from California. (Dec. 3)       
4 h
usatoday.com
Virus keeping most Santas at a distance
Santa Claus visits in a pandemic year are different. They are being done with layers of protection or moved online. Putting hundreds of kids daily onto Santa's lap to talk into his face — that's not happening for most. (Dec. 3)       
4 h
usatoday.com
Post-crash recovery: How one airline plans to restore confidence in the Boeing 737 MAX
With over 4,800 gross orders, the 737 MAX is the best-selling commercial aircraft in Boeing history.
4 h
edition.cnn.com
What to watch on Thursday: ‘Heaven’s Gate: The Cult of Cults’ on HBO Max
Thursday December 3, 2020 | “BattleBots” returns on Discovery Channel.
4 h
washingtonpost.com
Britain’s Vaccine Nationalism
“This is going to be a fantastic year for Britain,” read the tweet, posted by Boris Johnson. Underneath, the prime minister was pictured staring resolutely into the camera, both thumbs up in the air. The date was January 2, 2020—11 months ago, but seemingly from a different world.Surveying the scene in the last month of 2020, far from being a fantastic year, one in which Britain would unshackle itself from the European Union and chart a new path after years of Brexit weighing on its politics and society, it has been a horrible one in almost every way. In raw figures, the country fared worse than almost any other, suffering tens of thousands of deaths and significant economic pain. It spent more tackling the virus than many of its neighbours, implemented stricter shutdowns, and still lost more lives. At the very moment it was preparing to “take back control” from the EU, it appeared to have lost control of itself.And yet, here we are, once again being told that the sun might—just might—be about to shine on Britain. Yesterday, it became the first country in the world to authorize the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, with a national rollout beginning as early as next week. On top of this, a vaccine partly developed and tested in Britain has also showed promising results (though its data are now being questioned), while the country has quietly bought up a global stockpile that will cover more of its population than almost any other country’s.But far from being a moment of national unity, the announcement of Britain’s rapid-fire vaccine authorization quickly morphed into another front in the never-ending war over Brexit. After one government minister tweeted that the vaccine authorization would prove, in time, to be the moment Britain “led humanity’s charge against this disease,” the German ambassador to Britain hit back, replying: “Why is it so difficult to recognize this important step forward as a great international effort and success.” From here, Britain’s bickering tribes joined the fight. Leavers claimed that Britain’s speedy approval of the vaccine was proof of the case for Brexit; Remainers pointed out the drug was made in part by a German company and will be produced in Belgium.In one sense, the debate is as tiring as it is tedious. Britain is still governed by EU law, so the vaccine authorization has nothing to do with Brexit. EU member states have the power to follow London’s example, but have agreed to wait until the vaccine has been approved by their collective regulatory body. The EU criticized Britain’s decision, and the bloc’s regulator, the European Medicines Agency, said its process was more thorough, announcing that it would decide by December 29 whether to provisionally authorize the vaccine. Peter Liese, an EU lawmaker who is a member of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party, said Britain’s decision was “problematic” and urged EU member states not to follow suit.[Read: How the pandemic revealed Britain’s national illness]At its heart, though, there is an interesting Brexit question for all sides to consider. Ultimately, Brexit is a bet that, outside the EU, Britain can better regulate its economy to become more competitive. In essence, Brexit was founded on the idea that, freed from having to take into account the economies and politics of 27 other countries, Britain can more quickly, more efficiently, and more effectively govern itself.There are endless arguments suggesting that Britain has miscalculated—and horribly so. It has, in effect, made trading with its largest market harder and costlier while also giving up its seat at the table where the rules governing this market are made. This in turn has made Britain less useful to the U.S., its existential security partner and ally. Finally, the decision to pursue regulatory autonomy has created systemic tensions within the country itself, particularly with Northern Ireland, which has been stopped from having this regulatory freedom because of its land border with Ireland, as well as with Scotland, which did not want to leave the EU in the first place. In essence, Britain has taken quite the gamble without being certain what it might win, if anything.But that doesn’t mean the gamble is wrong; it just means it’s risky. The vaccine authorization is an important moment in this debate because it is an example of the kind of first-mover advantage that Britain will need to take advantage of over and over again outside the EU if it is to succeed. Fast-tracking authorization of a vaccine that was produced in the EU under EU law is not an argument in favor of Brexit, but it is an example of what Britain wants to do in the future.As one former Irish diplomat noted about Britain’s rush to claim national victory from an international success story, it clearly involves elements of insecurity and the “lack of national self-confidence that led to Brexit.” Yet, in the rush to criticize British chest-beating, a peculiar mirror image of this insecurity is presented.Those around Johnson plainly believe that Brexit offers an opportunity to outcompete the EU not just in today’s industries but, perhaps more important, in the industries that haven’t been invented—and therefore haven’t been regulated—yet. What is less often acknowledged is that this belief—or fear—is shared on the continent. The prospect of a deregulated post-Brexit Britain outcompeting Europe is why the EU has demanded much tighter regulations to protect the “level playing field” with Britain than it has with any other country.[Read: The U.K.’s coronavirus ‘herd immunity’ debacle]One ambassador to the EU for a major European state told me recently of his fears that the EU was complacent, protectionist, and too quick to turn in on itself, convinced its own strength made it autonomous. This diplomat, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that while he did not think Brexit was particularly clever or likely to be a success, the EU nevertheless needed to face up to some of the challenges it posed. For example, he said that the EU had very few universities ranked among the best in the world, and almost no technology innovation compared with its supposed trade rivals, the U.S. and China. He said his great fear was that the EU would essentially be left behind in the next industrial revolution, just as China was in the last.Nicolas Bauquet, an associate director at the Paris-based Institut Montaigne, told me the vaccine was a telling moment in the tussle between Britain and the EU over how best to protect sovereignty in a globalized world. France, like Britain, was concerned with its ability to act independently in the world, but had made a different bet, Bauquet said. “Britain has chosen to leave Europe to reclaim its sovereignty,” he told me. “France has decided to strengthen the EU to reclaim its sovereignty.”Bauquet said French President Emmanuel Macron, who is spearheading moves to reform the EU in order to make Brussels more powerful and effective, was, in effect, betting that in the 21st century, being in a bloc of hundreds of millions of people was better than being among “dozens of millions,” like Britain. However, he said this bet depended on Europe itself being able to act decisively, which it was not able to currently. “It’s because of this, I think, that the choice Britain has made resonates here, even if most people do not agree with it,” he said. “We understand that in this world where there’s an absolute need to be agile and for this reason Europe can be a liability or an asset.”The vaccine story, then, is a Brexit story and isn’t, at the same time. Britain is gambling on being quicker and better than the EU. In 2020, it was anything but—but that doesn’t mean it can’t be.
4 h
theatlantic.com
Kentucky mayor falls asleep in White Castle drive-thru, crashes into pole
A Kentucky mayor was arrested for driving under the influence after falling asleep in a White Castle drive-thru line and crashing into a utility pole Tuesday night, authorities said. Louisville Metro Police officers found Shively Mayor Beverly Chester-Burton standing outside her silver Cadillac after smashing into a pole as she was trying to leave the...
4 h
nypost.com
Top Biden economic adviser accused by former employee of mismanagement, retaliation over blog post
Biden appointed Heather Boushey to the Council of Economic Advisers this week.
4 h
foxnews.com