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Villamalea confinada tras acumular un centenar de positivos por COVID

Las entradas y salidas del municipio quedan restringidas, exceptuando los desplazamientos de carácter urgente o por motivo laboral. Siguen vigentes las medidas especiales decretadas el pasado domingo, entre las que se encontraba el cierre...
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Were Your Giving Tuesday Donations Matched by Facebook? Here's How to Check
It will take a few weeks to learn whether your GivingTuesday donation was matched by Facebook.
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newsweek.com
World AIDS Day 2020: Theme, History and Facts about HIV and AIDS
The first reported case of HIV was in 1981. Today, over 38 million people worldwide have the virus.
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newsweek.com
4 looming foreign policy crises that could derail Biden’s agenda early on
North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un walks to a meeting with President Donald Trump in the Demilitarized Zone on June 30, 2019, in Panmunjom, South Korea. | Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images Iran, North Korea, Russia, and Afghanistan could cause short-term problems for Biden’s long-term global agenda. President-elect Joe Biden may want his administration to focus on long-term issues like the coronavirus pandemic, climate change, rebuilding alliances, and America’s relationship with China, but some key near-term foreign policy problems will likely require his attention first. After the assassination of its top nuclear scientist by an unknown attacker, Iran might be less willing to engage in diplomacy with America and instead seek revenge by targeting US officials. North Korea could test an intercontinental ballistic missile early in Biden’s term to try to gauge the new administration’s response. The last remaining nuclear arms control deal between the US and Russia is set to expire just over two weeks after Biden takes office. And the reduced number of American troops in Afghanistan could derail sputtering peace talks and worsen the country’s security situation. Such a dilemma wouldn’t be unique to Biden. Every new president comes in with ideas on how to handle larger global problems, only to have the colloquial “tyranny of the inbox” monopolize their time. “If you assume that foreign policy is less than half, and maybe a quarter, of the president’s time, then that really shines a light on how serious this inbox problem is,” said Christopher Preble, co-director of the New American Engagement Initiative at the Atlantic Council think tank. Once he’s in the Oval Office, then, Biden will likely find his hopes of tackling grander foreign policy challenges dashed by the effort he’ll have to expend cleaning up more immediate messes. What follows is what four of those messes could look like. Iran could try to assassinate Israeli or American officials The 2015 nuclear agreement among Iran, the US, European powers, Russia, and China put tight restrictions on Tehran’s nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief. The Obama administration’s goal was to block Iran’s path to a nuclear weapon diplomatically instead of by military force. But President Donald Trump withdrew America from the deal in 2018, reimposed financial penalties on Iran, and asked European countries to cease their business with the country. That kicked off a years-long cycle of escalations that, among other things, has seen Iran stockpile 12 times the amount of low-enriched uranium the deal allowed and the assassinations of two prominent Iranian officials. The first took place in January, when the US killed Qassem Soleimani, the head of Iran’s paramilitary forces and one of the most powerful men in the country. Iran promised to exact a “harsher revenge” in response; so far, that revenge has consisted mostly of attacks on US forces and assets by Iranian-backed militias in Iraq. The second killing happened last Friday, when the mastermind behind Iran’s nuclear program, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, was fatally shot inside his vehicle near Tehran, reportedly with a remote-controlled weapon. No one has publicly claimed responsibility for the attack, but Israel has been suspected of orchestrating similar assassinations of Iranian nuclear scientists in the past. Iranian Defense Ministry/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images The funeral of Iranian top nuclear scientist, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh Mahabadi, is held at Imamzadeh Saleh Shrine in Tehran, Iran, on November 30, 2020. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani has already blamed Israel for it — and added his own threat. “Iran will surely respond to the martyrdom of our scientist at the proper time,” he said in a Saturday speech. If Iran were to respond to these assassinations by escalating attacks on US personnel in Iraq or by attempting to assassinate US or Israeli officials, it would pose a major challenge for a Biden administration. “Certainly a retaliation that led to the killing of an American in a theater like Iraq would create serious complications for the Biden team,” said Dalia Dassa Kaye, a Middle East expert at the RAND Corporation. The president-elect has often stated that America’s commitment to Israel will remain “ironclad” under his presidency. If Iran were to directly or even indirectly attack Israel, Biden would be under a lot of pressure to support Jerusalem in some way. All of this, of course, would lead the US and Iran further down the path toward war and away from a possible diplomatic resolution. “Such responses are likely to undermine the chances for diplomacy with Biden and easing of US sanctions,” Ellie Geranmayeh, an Iran analyst at the European Council on Foreign Relations, told me. However, Iran could use the threat of an attack as a pressure tool, she continued. “Iran could instead hold back its retaliatory moves — maintaining it will respond at a time and place of its choosing. This way Iran has some more bargaining chips when it comes to potential future talks with the Biden administration and Europeans.” What Iran does or doesn’t do in the coming months, then, could greatly impact Biden’s grander foreign policy plans. As the oft-quoted saying goes: “The enemy gets a vote.” North Korea could test its most powerful missile yet Within the first few months of Barack Obama’s presidency, North Korea tested a long-range missile and a nuclear device. And in Trump’s first year in charge, Pyongyang test-launched its first intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) and tested its most powerful nuclear bomb to date. Some experts warn that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un may make similar provocative moves in the early stages of a Biden administration. “North Korea is one of those challenges that no one really wants to deal with right now, since there are no easy solutions or pathways to slowing down the growth of the program. But Kim has a way of putting himself back on the high-priority list,” said Vipin Narang, an expert on North Korea’s nuclear program at MIT. There are many ways Kim could do that, but one in particular stands out: He could conduct the first test of the new ICBMs he displayed during an October parade. Those missiles were not only the biggest ever seen in North Korea’s arsenal, experts also said they were the largest road-mobile missiles with their own truck-based launchers in the world. In case of a war, then, North Korea’s military could roll these missiles out of underground bunkers, place them somewhere on land, and shoot them at the United States. A test simulating that kind of launch would rank among the most threatening actions ever taken by Pyongyang — surely ratcheting up tensions with the US in the process. High resolution of the new North Korean ICBM. pic.twitter.com/gpd6CileNd— Ankit Panda (@nktpnd) October 10, 2020 The new missiles haven’t been tested yet, though, and they may have issues North Korea still needs to fix. That’s why many experts predict Pyongyang will probably test one in early 2021, in part to see how it goes and in part to send a message to Biden: North Korea is a nuclear power, and you can’t do anything about it. Such a provocative move would require some sort of response from the Biden administration. That doesn’t necessarily mean war, said Elizabeth Saunders, a US foreign policy expert at Georgetown University. But it could mean more sanctions on North Korea, reinstating US military drills with South Korea, sending more US warships to the area, or all of the above. Figuring out the best response could take up a lot of time and energy early in Biden’s term, leaving less time and energy to address some of his longer-term policy objectives. Russia could play hardball on arms control New START, short for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, is a nuclear arms control agreement signed between the US and Russia in 2011. The pact limits the size of the two countries’ nuclear arsenals, which together account for 93 percent of all nuclear warheads on earth. The problem is that the deal — the last major arms control accord between Washington and Moscow still in effect — is set to expire on February 5, 2021. That gives Biden just 16 days after becoming president to extend the pact. Biden has committed to extending New START, and Russian President Vladimir Putin has said he wants to extend it for at least one year. Most experts believe Biden and Putin will swiftly extend the agreement before the deadline. “My impression is that Russia still regards an extension of New START as being in their interest,” said Sarah Bidgood, an expert on Russia’s nuclear program at the Middlebury Institute for International Studies. Alexei Druzhnin/Sputnik/AFP/Getty Images Russia President Vladimir Putin chairs a video meeting of the Pobeda (Victory) organizing committee at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on July 2, 2020. But the short timeline could give Moscow an advantage to extract some early concessions from the Biden administration before greenlighting an extension. The Kremlin, experts say, could demand Biden lift Trump-imposed sanctions on the country, or ask that the US make a statement praising Russia’s military presence in Nagorno-Karabakh to keep the peace between Armenia and Azerbaijan. It’s unclear if such requests would truly be of the take-it-or-leave-it variety. Moscow might want to see what it could get, if anything, before agreeing to an extension. Still, such a move could take the US and Russia to the brink of losing New START and decades of arms control efforts along with it. What’s more, Bidgood said, a tough negotiation could follow after the extension, especially if Washington and Moscow don’t prolong New START for the full five years allowed under the deal. The potential for nuclear-related trouble with Russia right at the start of a new administration, then, could be a time suck for the Biden administration. Fewer US troops in Afghanistan could derail peace talks between Kabul and the Taliban With just two months left in office, the Trump administration is rushing to wind down the 19-year US war in Afghanistan by cutting the number of US troops in the country from 4,500 to 2,500 by January 15 — five days before Biden is to be sworn in. But while many on both the left and the right in the US support bringing that war to an end, experts worry such a quick withdrawal will harm America’s interests in the country. “It’s hard to imagine a less responsible way to withdraw,” Jason Dempsey, a former Army infantry officer who served in Afghanistan and Iraq, told me earlier this month. The main concern is what leaving so abruptly means for America’s diplomatic pact with the Taliban. The deal both parties signed earlier this year said all US troops had to leave by May 2021, assuming conditions in the country are relatively peaceful and the Taliban has upheld its end of the deal, which includes engaging in peace talks with the Afghan government and not attacking international forces. Those peace talks began in September but are not going very well — not least because Taliban fighters have increased their attacks on Afghan security forces and civilians across the country in recent months. Antonio Masiello/Getty Images US Army soldiers during NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg’s visit to the Italian-run military base “Camp Arena” on November 7, 2018, in Herat, Afghanistan. Dempsey, who’s now at the Center for a New American Security think tank, said pulling more US troops out of the country as those negotiations proceed could hurt Kabul’s negotiating position and encourage even more Taliban attacks. “Giving away any leverage you have as you leave is a pretty stupid way to go about it,” he told me. The question is what Biden would do with the forces Trump plans to leave him with. The president-elect has said he wants to keep at least some troops in Afghanistan to serve as a counterterrorism force, so it’s possible he may not change anything when he takes office in January. But if the smaller US presence emboldens the Taliban to ask for more in diplomatic talks with the Afghan government, or even attempt a forcible takeover of the Afghan government — as it did in 1996 — then the Biden administration might have to scramble to back its ally in Kabul. That could potentially lead the new president to escalate the war in the country, thereby turning much of his time and attention away from other projects to focus on an old one.
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vox.com
F1 superstar Lewis Hamilton tests positive for COVID-19
Hamilton is in isolation in accordance with the health protocols in Bahrain.
cbsnews.com
Pence says vaccine distribution could begin by mid-December
"We strongly believe the vaccine distribution process could begin as soon as the week of December 14," Pence said.
cbsnews.com
The Finance 202: Bipartisan effort to revive economic relief programs faces high hurdles
The group of senators will need to break logjams over the price of a bill and its key components.
washingtonpost.com
Top nuclear scientist killed by remote-controlled gun, Iran says
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani blamed Israel for the killing of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh and vowed retribution "in due time."
cbsnews.com
Mcdonald's is giving away 10,000 free sandwiches for fans who shave their faces
Shave the date: the McDonald's McRib is back this week and you can get a free one -- if you shave your face.
edition.cnn.com
Fed chair, treasury secretary testify on Capitol Hill amid gridlock over coronavirus relief
With federal protections like eviction moratoriums and student loan suspensions set to expire at the end of the year, Congress remains gridlocked over a new coronavirus relief package. As Nancy Cordes reports, a group of moderate Democratic and Republican senators are now conducting informal talks.
cbsnews.com
U.S. reports record 93,000 coronavirus hospitalizations
A record-breaking number of Americans are hospitalized with the coronavirus, and experts fear the number may grow now that the Thanksgiving holiday has passed.
cbsnews.com
Child Bride, 13, Broke China's Marriage Law, Regulator Says
The young bride and her 17-year-old "husband" tied the knot under under local customs, but Chinese authorities have called the wedding unlawful.
newsweek.com
Cities prepare for surge of COVID-19 hospitalizations
Post-Thanksgiving COVID-19 cases surge as states and local communities remain divided over how to respond, 10 months into the pandemic. David Begnaud reports.
cbsnews.com
Trump lashes out at GOP Gov. Doug Ducey after certification of Arizona results showing Biden win
During the certification, Ducey's phone buzzed with "Hail to the Chief" - a ringtone he has said he uses for White House calls. He set it aside.        
usatoday.com
The Health 202: Coronavirus deaths will probably surge around Christmas
It will take a few weeks for the consequences from Thanksgiving gatherings to become visible.
washingtonpost.com
65 years ago today, Rosa Parks stood up for civil rights by sitting down
It was on this day in 1955 when a simple act of defiance elevated a seamstress in Montgomery, Alabama, into a pivotal symbol in America's civil rights movement.
edition.cnn.com
Pfizer, BioNTech seek COVID-19 vaccine approval in Europe
Pfizer and BioNTech have asked European regulators for conditional approval of their experimental coronavirus vaccine — and officials say they could make a decision by the end of the month. The companies said they submitted an application to the European Medicines Agency on Monday for a conditional marketing authorization for their COVID-19 shot, which was...
nypost.com
Wisconsin completes canvass and certifies Biden win in state
The Trump campaign has pledged to file a lawsuit.
cbsnews.com
Even hand-picked justices won’t buy Trump’s claims
The president's legal claim never made sense. Now, even right-wing justices admit it.
washingtonpost.com
Snow for parts of the Great Lakes, Northeast and Ohio Valley
The storm system that brought heavy rain, strong winds, severe storms and snow will move offshore Tuesday, but colder air being pulled from Canada will still bring moderate to heavy snow for parts of the Great Lakes, Northeast and Ohio Valley. 
foxnews.com
Eye Opener: Coronavirus vaccines show promise as cases surge
Promising breakthroughs on COVID-19 vaccines are raising spirits as cases around the country surge. Also, Scott Atlas, a controversial member of President Trump's coronavirus task force, has resigned. All that and all that matters in today's Eye Opener. Your world in 90 seconds.
cbsnews.com
Portland has worst stolen-car rate per capita in US, study finds
Portland topped a list of 15 major metro areas for stolen cars per capita, based on the FBI Uniform Crime Report. The Oregon city raking ahead of San Jose and Seattle.
foxnews.com
Metal monolith discovered in Utah desert mysteriously disappears
Authorities said it still didn't know whether an "extraterrestrial or earthling" left it there.
cbsnews.com
Trump allies to Michigan judge: Force Gov. Whitmer to overturn Biden's win, give state to president
The allegations, provided without credible evidence of widespread fraud or misconduct, have been rebuffed in courts in other states.        
usatoday.com
Lawmaker and Diplomats Flee Police Raid on COVID Lockdown Orgy
EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty ImagesPARIS—Belgian police have broken up an illegal lockdown orgy involving 25 men including at least one foreign politician and several diplomats in a central Brussels bar, according to local reports.Officers burst into the ground floor of a bar on Rue des Pierres in the Belgian capital on Friday night to discover alcohol, drugs and what has been described as “a party of legs in the air,” Belgian newspaper La Dernière Heure (DH) reported, with a source claiming: “We interrupted a gang bang!”One of the revelers, a foreign Member of the European Parliament (MEP) who reportedly remains unnamed after invoking his parliamentary right to immunity, tried to escape through a window but injured himself and was then confronted by police reinforcements that had just arrived. The reports conflict with European Parliament regulations, which state that members can be subject to “inquiry, detention or legal proceedings” if they are “found in the act of committing an offence.”Read more at The Daily Beast.
thedailybeast.com
Experts warned the fall Covid-19 surge would be bad. In November alone, hospitalizations more than doubled
Health officials projected the Covid-19 surge in the fall would be brutal. November alone proved those predictions true, with about a third of the nation's total cases reported in just 30 days.
edition.cnn.com
Stocks Rally, Looking Past Virus Concerns
The Fed chair and the Treasury secretary will paint starkly different visions of the challenges facing the economy today. Here’s the latest.
nytimes.com
Ohio GOP lawmakers are trying to impeach Gov. Mike DeWine over his covid-19 rules. He says it’s a ‘fantasy.’
Four Republican state lawmakers say the governor violated state and federal laws by requiring face masks and ordering some businesses to close.
washingtonpost.com
Why everyone thinks their city is best -- a look at place attachment
Personal identity and geographic location are inextricably linked. Place can be as important to a person's identity as anything else — their profession, religion, relationships — and this creates a profound attachment to the city itself.
edition.cnn.com
Falcons’ stunning blowout win highlights underdogs’ big Sunday
Sharps, contrarians and sportsbooks feasted on Sunday, as Week 12 dogs went 8-4 ATS with four outright wins and Unders went 8-4. Nearly every chalky favorite failed to cover for the public as unpopular ’dogs barked loudly for those brave enough to grab the points instead of lay them. Here are the four underdog outright...
nypost.com
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, family given experimental coronavirus vaccine from China, analyst says
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and his family were recently given an experimental coronavirus vaccine from China, a US analyst said on Tuesday.
foxnews.com
The Cybersecurity 202: The Supreme Court may finally rein in an outdate anti-hacking law
The 1980s law has made it tough for cybersecurity pros to do their jobs.
washingtonpost.com
Chef David Chang won it all on ‘Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.’ He’s giving the $1 million to hospitality workers.
Chang became the first celebrity competing on the show to win the $1 million prize.
washingtonpost.com
Barack Obama stumps for Jon Ossoff In new TV ad
Former President Barack Obama is prominently featured in a new television ad for Georgia Democratic Senate candidate Jon Ossoff, pitching him as an injustice-fighting crusader who will pass a new Voting Rights Act and "listen to the experts" in combating the coronavirus pandemic.
edition.cnn.com
Chef André Chiang's life explored
Chef Andre Chiang discusses "André and his Olive Tree" - a film documenting the closure of his Michelin-starred restaurant in Singapore. (Dec. 1)       
usatoday.com
ShowBiz Minute: Bad Bunny; BTS; Ora
Bad Bunny named Spotify's most-streamed artist of the year; BTS outfits featured in the band's "Dynamite" video go up for auction; Rita Ora apologizes for breaking lockdown rules after holding birthday party. (Dec. 1)       
usatoday.com
Democrat Christy Smith concedes to GOP's Garcia in race for seat held by Katie Hill
Democrat Christy Smith conceded Monday in a knife-edged loss to Republican rival Mike Garcia, who retained his congressional seat in the 25th District north of Los Angeles.
foxnews.com
These 17 arbitration-eligible players could soon join full and frozen free agent market
With 175 free agents still unemployed, the list could get larger if teams non-tender these players. Here's a look at the biggest names and rumors.       
usatoday.com
How Kate Middleton's Mother Will Involve George, Charlotte and Louis in Christmas Despite COVID
Prince George, Prince Louis and Princess Charlotte will still get to decorate their grandmother's tree this year—despite the coronavirus pandemic.
newsweek.com
Amazon sales surge during a record-breaking holiday shopping season
Amazon was already having a blowout year. And it's shaping up to be a record-breaking holiday shopping season, too.
edition.cnn.com
Thousands Sign Up to Throw Eggs at Margaret Thatcher Statue
The statute will be placed on a 10ft plinth to prevent it from being vandalized.
newsweek.com
Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton has COVID-19, will miss next race
Current Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton has twice tested positive for COVID-19 after reporting symptoms on Monday. The 35-year-old driver will miss the next race on Sunday.
foxnews.com
White House Coronavirus Adviser Scott Atlas Legacy Will Be Propping Up Trump’s Most Dangerous Pandemic Impulses
Atlas resigned Monday after joining the Trump administration in August.
slate.com
Live updates: Biden to appear in Delaware with economic team; Trump lashes out at GOP governors
The president-elect plan is staging an event to introduce leading members of the economic team he intends to bring to Washington, including treasury nominee Janet Yellen.
washingtonpost.com
Fire devastates world's largest sand island
The fire as been raging for more than six weeks and is consuming large swaths of Fraser Island's unique forests.
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cbsnews.com
How Joe Biden and Mark Kelly show Arizona is now a purple state
Democrat Mark Kelly will be sworn in on Wednesday as Arizona's junior US senator, finishing the final two years of the term won by the late Sen. John McCain in 2016. Both President-elect Joe Biden and Kelly were certified as the winners of their respective Arizona races on Monday.
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edition.cnn.com
Biden readies major stimulus push and flurry of executive actions in first 100 days
President-elect Joe Biden and his transition team are preparing for an early, all-out push to pass an ambitious new stimulus bill, while also drawing up plans for a flurry of executive actions aimed at delivering on campaign promises and undoing the Trump administration's efforts to undermine key government agencies.
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edition.cnn.com
30+ brands and retailers that are giving back this Giving Tuesday
To help you make the most of your Giving Tuesday, we've rounded up a list of some of the online stores that are offering up a chance for you to make a difference with your money.
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edition.cnn.com
A 'Dynamite' auction for BTS fans
Pastel outfits worn by pop superstars BTS in the music video for their summer hit "Dynamite" are going up for sale in January - for a good cause. (Dec. 1)       
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usatoday.com