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Mitä tapahtui Frendien Chandlerille? Matthew Perry tunnistamattomana tuoreissa kuvissa

Frendit-sarjasta tuttu näyttelijä Matthew Perry ei vaikuta tuoreiden kuvien perusteella hyvinvoivalta. Näyttelijä Matthew Perry, 50, ikuistettiin tuoreisiin kuviin huolestuttavassa kunnossa. Chandler Bingin roolista Frendit-sarjasta tutuksi tulleen Perryn ulkomuodon perusteella vaikuttaa siltä, ettei hän ole viime aikoina pitänyt kovin hyvää huolta itsestään. Näyttelijä erosi toukokuussa naisystävästään Molly Hurwitzista kahden vuoden yhteiselon jälkeen. Tuoreet kuvat antavat osviittaa siitä, ettei sinkkuelämä ole lähtenyt Perryn osalta käyntiin ainakaan kovin terveellisesti.
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All the details on Nicola Peltz’s engagement ring from Brooklyn Beckham
Her classic emerald-cut stone could be worth half a million dollars.
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Naya Rivera’s body recovered on seven-year anniversary of Cory Monteith’s death
The discovery of Naya Rivera’s body early Monday in a California lake tragically coincides with the anniversary of her “Glee” co-star Cory Monteith’s death. Rivera’s body was pulled from the waters of Lake Piru, about 56 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles, exactly seven years after Monteith died of a drug overdose. The 33-year-old played...
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Andy McCarthy: Media, left's reaction to Trump's Roger Stone commutation was 'remarkable'
Fox News contributor Andy McCarthy said on Monday that the media’s reaction to Roger Stone’s commutation was “remarkable” considering past presidents' controversial use of the power.
foxnews.com
Cam Newton-Bill Belichick Patriots combo is ‘terrifying:’ Greg Van Roten
An offseason addition to the Jets’ offensive line thinks the Cam Newton-Bill Belichick union could be disastrous — for the rest of the league. “What does he bring to the Patriots?” former Panthers guard Greg Van Van Roten told SiriusXM NFL Radio. “It’s definitely terrifying to think if Cam Newton’s healthy and he’s in Belichick’s...
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‘Downton Abbey’ star wishes she knew why show was so popular
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Jennifer Lopez, Alex Rodriguez Mets bid adds NFL star power
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Rockets' Russell Westbrook reveals positive coronavirus test: 'Please take this virus seriously'
Houston Rockets star Russell Westbrook announced Monday he had tested positive for coronavirus prior to his team’s trip to Florida for the NBA’s restart to the season.
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Lori Loughlin, Mossimo Giannulli sell mansion for $10M below asking price
They sold the full house for a lot less than full price.
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Cardi B celebrates Kulture’s birthday with hundreds of thousands in diamonds
Including matching bedazzled Patek Philippe watches, which can go for six figures apiece.
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Angels pitcher Patrick Sandoval says he tested positive for COVID-19
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latimes.com
Southwest Airlines likely to cut jobs unless bookings ‘triple’
Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly told employees on Monday it needs a dramatic jump in passenger demand or it will be forced to take new steps to reduce staffing. Employees face a Wednesday deadline whether to participate in a voluntary incentive program to leave the airline. “Although furloughs and layoffs remain our very last resort,...
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National Gallery of Art to begin reopening indoor exhibits next week
The museum will roll out new safety policies and limit the number of visitors with timed passes.
washingtonpost.com
Questions hang over Democrats’ shift to virtual convention
With one month to go until the Democratic convention kicks off, the party has unveiled how the nearly 4,000 delegates – the vast majority of whom won’t be attending the event in person – will vote. But still up in the air is whether each delegation will meet in person or virtually in their own states.
foxnews.com
Tesla stock soars as S&P 500 inclusion appears imminent
Shares of Tesla continued their seemingly endless growth on Monday, climbing as much as 14 percent as investors bet on the stock’s possible inclusion in the S&P 500 index. Tesla reports quarterly earnings next week. If it posts a profit that meets generally accepted accounting principles, it will have four consecutive profitable quarters under its...
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Trump spreads conspiracy from ex-game show host
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edition.cnn.com
What a History of Smells Can Teach Us About Medicine, Misogyny, and Farts of the Past
Historian Robert Muchembled’s new book is full of disgusting, delicious details about early modern France.
slate.com
How to watch for spectacular Comet Neowise – before it disappears for 6,800 years
Skywatchers are in for a treat over the next few weeks as newly discovered Comet Neowise is paying a visit to our solar system.        
usatoday.com
Hundreds protest California’s singing ban at Golden Gate Bridge: ‘Let us worship’
Hundreds gathered on the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, Calif., Thursday to protest Gov. Gavin Newsom's coronavirus ban on singing in churches.
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Airlines struggle with crowded seats
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edition.cnn.com
Boris Johnson says Britons ‘should be wearing face masks in shops’ amid coronavirus
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged the people of England to wear face coverings in shops on Monday to prevent the spread of coronavirus, although he stopped short of issuing any official requirements.
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America's schools: Teachers like me don't feel safe enough to return to the classroom yet
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usatoday.com
University apologizes for professor who said pro-police rally should be called ‘white supremacist rally’
A Nebraska Jesuit university apologized Friday on behalf of a professor who tweeted that a pro-police rally in Omaha ought to be retitled a “white supremacist rally.”
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DeSean Jackson accepts 94-year-old Holocaust survivor’s invite to visit Auschwitz
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Makwan Amirkhani has title run in mind after second straight anaconda choke win
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Seoul Holds Funeral For Mayor As Accuser Details Years Of Alleged Sexual Harassment
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npr.org
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Prosecutors in Ghislaine Maxwell case say proposed $5 million bond is 'effectively meaningless'
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‘Broken Heart Syndrome’ has increased during coronavirus pandemic
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Mount Rushmore: Isn't it time to talk about its Native American history?​​​​​​​
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The best of Naya Rivera’s ‘Glee’ moments and 29-year career highlights
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Police union boss says crime 'running rampant' in NYC following video showing cop in a headlock
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Wikipedia Editors Smeared Mark Levin in Multiyear Campaign
After radio host Mark Levin criticized the “police-state tactics” of the Obama Administration in its use of intercepts and FISA warrants in 2017, editors on Wikipedia began to attack Levin’s credibility through edits to his page on the site. The criticism, which allegedly prompted President Donald Trump’s controversial wire-tapping allegations, has since been vindicated by revelations about widespread falsehoods in FISA warrants issued against Trump campaign adviser Carter Page, seen now as part of a broader Obamagate scandal. A number of attacks on Levin eventually ended up in news articles shortly before and after the premiere of his show on Fox News.
breitbart.com
Statues Of Conquistador Juan De Oñate Come Down As New Mexico Wrestles With History
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Flash flood sends New Jersey woman on harrowing ride in storm drain under city
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Elon Musk on why he’s still backing Kanye West for president
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Employers find $600 coronavirus unemployment checks tough to compete with as states slowly reopen
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Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes takes a hit selling NYC townhouse
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Cuomo warns visitors from 'highest-risk' coronavirus states to fill out paperwork -- or face $2,000 fine
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is now warning out-of-state travelers they could face $2,000 fines if they leave its airports without handing over their contact information upon arrival. 
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Andy Samberg's new movie 'Palm Springs' broke a Sundance sales record by 69 cents
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usatoday.com
Florida strip clubs shuttered for lack of social distancing
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Ohio Army veteran who refused to wear face mask dies of COVID-19
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How to Corrupt the Justice Department
So you want to corrupt the Justice Department.It’s a worthy project for the power-hungry politician. These are polarized times. Left alone, the department could get weaponized against you, particularly—and only you know this—if there are skeletons in your closet. The department has a lot of people with guns and subpoena power, a lot of investigative muscle, and it can lock up your friends—and even you—if you’re not careful. It’s really a good thing to get it under control, if you can swing it.But it’s hard. A lot of the people who work there are unfortunately earnest. They believe in this whole rule-of-law thing; some of them even believe in equal justice under the law. They don’t think of themselves as merely serving the powerful. So if you want to protect yourself and your people from a complex investigation, you can’t just declare that you’re above the law and the investigation needs to stop. That will just egg them on. You’ve got to proceed carefully. You’ve got to work the system. You’ve got to speak its language.[Quinta Jurecic and Benjamin Wittes: Being an actual authoritarian is too much work for Trump]Fortunately for you, you have a perfect playbook for the project. Donald J. Trump wasn’t a successful president. He presided over a grossly botched response to a pandemic that left more than 130,000 Americans dead and the economy in tatters.But Trump was the unrivaled master at institutional corruption. And his approach to bending the Justice Department to his will be studied as long as politicians in power fear legal accountability and look to engage—as Clausewitz might put it—in lawyering by other means.Here are the six steps in the Trump playbook:[Kevin Wack: American justice isn’t impartial anymore]First, you’ve got to get the right attorney general. It turns out not to be good enough to have one who is ideologically sympathetic to you—after all, if you’ve made it this far, your main concern should be loyalty, not ideological consistency. It’s not even good enough to have one who slavishly worships you. Such a person, after all, might still recuse himself. He might not have a great deal of institutional sophistication about the department and how it works. He may not have the moxy to do the things that need to be done. He may leave things operationally in the hands of some deputy who actually cares about his reputation, if only a little, and who’s constantly looking over his shoulder worried about what the career folks might think of him.You need someone who does not need to be all things to all people—who will, like a honey badger, just not care if the legal community disapproves of him or if the press is appalled or if members of Congress call for his impeachment. You want someone who knows his way around the department, who knows what levers to pull, and who will be totally fearless about pulling them.And this point is critical: Your right-hand man (or woman) in this endeavor needs to be someone who is willing to reach down to the level of individual prosecutions to get his way. Because scuttling an investigation isn’t a high-level policy task. It requires getting down and dirty. If your guy is not willing to do that, he’s not serious.If you’ve got this person in from the beginning, you’re golden. There won’t be an investigation to start with—because you’ll have squashed it. This is the ideal outcome.The hard part arises if you screw up at first and end up with someone who’s not up to the task and your fixer doesn’t come in until the major investigation is well under way, maybe even done.This brings us to step two: once the investigation concludes, make sure your attorney general snips off any remaining loose threads. You don’t want to leave hanging the possibility that your friends—or you yourself—could face criminal charges when you eventually leave power. So encourage your attorney general to make a public statement that the existing evidence does not establish that any further crimes—such as, say, obstruction of justice—took place. This isn’t an absolute shield against future prosecution, since the Justice Department can theoretically reopen matters that have been closed. But here’s where a really sly operator can turn the Justice Department’s traditions against it. There’s a pretty strong norm against doing this without new evidence, which means that it will be significantly more controversial for some future administration to pursue charges against you with this record on the table. And if a future administration decides to go for it anyway, you’ll be able to point to that contrary record in complaining that you’re facing politically motivated harassment.[Mario Loyola: Trump’s DOJ interference is actually not crazy]Third, you’ll want to begin a Justice Department investigation into the investigation that caused you such trouble, in order to cast doubt on the integrity of the negative findings against you and your friends. Leave this up to your loyal attorney general, rather than directing it yourself—you want it to have a sheen of seriousness and legitimacy. Accordingly, you’ll want to make sure that the prosecutor in charge has credibility to burn and isn’t obviously a partisan hack.When it comes to the results of the meta-investigation, don’t worry about consistency. Having a compelling alternative story about what happened is less important than being able to make some vague noises about unspecified wrongdoing by the people who looked into you. The latter is far more versatile—if nobody quite knows what your argument is, you can deploy it against any possible counterargument.Yelling a lot will help.And don’t worry about wrapping things up quickly. The longer your investigation of the investigators goes on, the more shadowy and ominous it will seem. After all, if your prosecutor’s probe has been going on for a long time, he must be digging his teeth into something really bad. If you are in the middle of a campaign for reelection, your attorney general might consider dropping increasingly dire hints about what the prosecutor has found, just to spice things up. And don’t be shy about duplicative investigations either. When one is done, start another. Keep a constant low buzz going about about the conspiratorial nature of the original investigation.The hard part is going to be the cases that have already generated indictments. These are going to be messy. In these cases, after all, the Justice Department has already put on the record its claim that defendants have committed crimes. It may have even proved it in court, or the defendants may have admitted it. And there’s nothing worse than convictions or guilty pleas to validate the premises you are trying into cast doubt with your meta-investigations.Handling these cases is always going to be a case-by-case dance, but the Trump playbook offers a few key steps. One is—and this is Step 4—that you use your meta-investigation to discredit all of the convictions. Even if the evidence behind them is overpowering and clear, if you can get people to believe that the investigation itself was corrupt, it follows that there is something deficient about them.You want to attack all of the pending cases—at whatever stage they happen to be. If someone is awaiting sentencing, you come in and argue for a lighter sentence. Your attorney general may have to reach down to the line level and overrule the career folks to do it, but that’s okay. Do it anyway. If you’ve conditioned the battlefield by discrediting the investigators over a long period of time, this will actually seem like justice to a lot of people. Even if one of those career prosecutors testifies before Congress about the corrupt interference in the case, the clamor will pass.Fifth, if you get involved before sentencing, your attorney general can simply dismiss the case. This will take a great many people by surprise, and it will offend many of them. But that’s only a problem if you and your honey-badger attorney general care. This is admittedly an aggressive step, and if you’re going to take it, some preparatory work is probably in order. It’s a good idea to have a U.S. attorney review the case specifically and recommend its dismissal. And you have to be prepared for defections by career officials. But ultimately, dismissal is an arrow in your quiver, and it’s one the courts will likely insist is yours alone to shootFinally, there’s a sixth tool for when everything else fails—for the case in which the evidence proves guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, the jury has ruled, and the judge has passed sentence. It’s a tool, in other words, for when things are out of the Justice Department’s hands. You still have the power of clemency.Sometimes, if you really want something done, you just have to do it yourself.
theatlantic.com
Ghislaine Maxwell Tried to Hide When F.B.I. Knocked, Prosecutors Say
On the day of her arrest, Ms. Maxwell, a longtime companion of Jeffrey Epstein, refused to answer the door and fled to another room, according to a new court filing.
nytimes.com
Tony Stewart launching new oval racing series for old stars and young racers
New NASCAR alternative set to launch.
foxnews.com
17 states, DC sue Trump administration over foreign student policy shift
Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey led a coalition of 17 states and the District of Columbia in suing the Trump administration on Monday in a bid to block a new policy that would force foreign students to return home if their upcoming courses are entirely online.
foxnews.com
Body found at Southern California lake during search for missing ‘Glee’ star Naya Rivera
Officials did not confirm the identity of the body, but said a recovery is in process.
washingtonpost.com