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COVID-19 has broken NYC’s housing market
Count the city’s housing market as another casualty of the pandemic and the lockdown; the only real question is how deep the damage will go. With roughly 700,000 renters thrown out of work and evictions banned for the interim, a full quarter of tenants have gone four months without paying rent, Bloomberg Businessweek reports. They’re...
nypost.com
Ginni Thomas, wife of Justice Clarence Thomas, slams Black Lives Matter: report
The wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas slammed the Black Lives Matter movement.
foxnews.com
President Trump commutes Roger Stone's prison sentence
President Donald Trump has commuted the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone, who was convicted of crimes that included lying to Congress in part, prosecutors said, to protect the President. The announcement came just days before Stone was set to report to a federal prison. CNN's Kaitlan Collins has more.
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Goya CEO's praise of Trump sets off social media frenzy
Goya-ing, Goya-ing, gone. A boycott against Goya for its CEO's comments about President Donald Trump picks up steam. CNN's Jeanne Moos reports.
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NEA head issues warning over school reopening drive, says 'face masks alone' will cost 'millions of dollars'
Nationa Education Association President Lily Eskelsen Garcia fired back at President Trump on "The Story" Friday after the president repeated his threat to withhold federal funds from districts that keep their doors closed to in-person instruction this fall.
foxnews.com
De Blasio privileges Black Lives Matter protests — in blatant defiance of the law
Mayor Bill de Blasio has banned large gatherings in the city until the end of September, saying, “We just can’t have that while we’re focusing on health right now.” But he’s making one big exception: Black Lives Matter protests. “This is a particular moment in American history where 400 years of oppression, 400 years of...
nypost.com
Usain Bolt’s Greatness Code
How does the fastest man alive do it?
slate.com
A new world war over technology
Nations and companies around the world are being sucked into a running battle over the future of technology between the United States and China, forcing them to choose sides in a conflict that is fracturing global supply chains and pushing businesses out of lucrative markets.
edition.cnn.com
A new world war over technology
Nations and companies around the world are being sucked into a running battle over the future of technology between the United States and China, forcing them to choose sides in a conflict that is fracturing global supply chains and pushing businesses out of lucrative markets.
edition.cnn.com
Prosecutors say three LAPD officers falsified gang information
Three Los Angeles police officers face charges for allegedly falsely identifying people as gang members or associates, according to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's office.
edition.cnn.com
Nick Cordero is getting a Cafe Fiorello table named in his honor
Owner Shelly Fireman was touched by the late “Waitress” star’s courageous fight.
nypost.com
In CA: Can anyone or anything, even the coronavirus, take away your right to sing?
There are no signs caseloads are easing in California and across the Southwest. And as schools furiously debate reopening and how, a rumor swirls about whether vaccines are required (I hate to give away the end, but they're not. More on that later). Plus: Is singing in church a constitutional right?        
usatoday.com
Army launches civilian review of Fort Hood following Vanessa Guillen's killing
The US Army is assembling a panel of four civilian consultants to review the "command climate and culture" at Fort Hood in Texas, in the wake of the killing of Spc. Vanessa Guillen, Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy announced Friday.
edition.cnn.com
Pennsylvania man saves cop despite history with police
After a year spent in jail over a false accusation, Daylan Mclee developed resentment toward the police. But in one heroic moment, Mclee saved a police officer from a burning vehicle. Steve Hartman reports in this week's "On The Road."
cbsnews.com
Rachel Bilson and Bill Hader split: reports
Bill Hader and Rachel Bilson have called it quits, according to multiple reports. 
foxnews.com
New York’s latest inhumanity to disabled group-home residents amid COVID-19
Thousands of healthy, developmentally disabled New Yorkers are captive behind locked doors because of a bureaucratic regression, backed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and hidden from public view by the COVID-19 crisis. The situation is sadly reminiscent of the horrors of Willowbrook State Hospital. New York state is zooming to the new normal: tattoo parlors inking,...
nypost.com
Gov. Cuomo predicts COVID-19 bump for NY amid surge in other states
Gov. Andrew Cuomo predicted New York will see another bump in coronavirus cases because of the pandemic’s surge in many southern and western states — and admitted the quarantine he imposed on visitors from hotspots areas will be unable to stop it. “Look, we’re doing everything we can. The quarantine, we have an enforcement mechanism....
nypost.com
Chicago grandfather, 80, robbed, beaten on grocery trip
Roberto Lopez Flores was repeatedly punched and kicked, and left lying in a pool of blood.
foxnews.com
Inmates are 5 times more likely to get virus than others, study says
"Prisoners have a right to adequate protection of their health while incarcerated," said the lead author of the study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
cbsnews.com
Trump confirms US conducted cyberattack against Russia in 2018
President Donald Trump, for the first time, confirmed the US conducted a covert cyberattack in 2018 against Russia's Internet Research Agency. The Internet Research Agency is a troll farm blamed by the US for helping to facilitate interference both in the 2016 presidential election and the 2018 midterms.
edition.cnn.com
Trump confirms US conducted cyberattack against Russia in 2018
President Donald Trump, for the first time, confirmed the US conducted a covert cyberattack in 2018 against Russia's Internet Research Agency. The Internet Research Agency is a troll farm blamed by the US for helping to facilitate interference both in the 2016 presidential election and the 2018 midterms.
edition.cnn.com
President Trump Commutes Longtime Friend Roger Stone’s Prison Sentence
The White House said Stone was a victim of the Russia 'hoax'
time.com
French bus driver dies after ‘barbaric’ attack over face masks
A French bus driver has died five days after being viciously beaten during a dispute over wearing face masks, his family announced Friday. Philippe Monguillot, 58, was initially left brain dead after he confronted a group of passengers who were not complying with a rule that requires face masks on public transportation when they boarded...
nypost.com
California couple agrees to guilty pleas in college scam
A California couple has agreed to plead guilty to paying $250,000 to get their daughter into the University of Southern California as a fake volleyball recruit
washingtonpost.com
Charlize Theron not focused on dating, says Gwyneth Paltrow’s separate-home living's ‘my kind of relationship’
Sorry folks, Charlize Theron is emotionally unavailable right now.
foxnews.com
Fauci opens up about why he's not being allowed on TV
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top expert on infection diseases in the US, says he hasn't briefed President Trump in months, and says his blunt messaging may be why he's not being allowed on US television recently.
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Fauci opens up about why he's not being allowed on TV
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top expert on infection diseases in the US, says he hasn't briefed President Trump in months, and says his blunt messaging may be why he's not being allowed on US television recently.
edition.cnn.com
Bill Hader and Rachel Bilson have reportedly split
Hader and Bilson made their official debut as a couple at the 2020 Golden Globes.
nypost.com
Alfredo Ortiz: AOC & Dems launch absurd boycott of Goya Foods after CEO joins Trump pro-Hispanic initiative
Democratic politicians and activists have launched a ridiculous boycott campaign against Goya Foods because its CEO is helping lead President Trump's Hispanic Prosperity Initiative.
foxnews.com
Roger Stone’s Commutation Was Inevitable
Forget Bernie Kerik, Scooter Libby, Michael Milken—even Sheriff Joe Arpaio. This was the presidential reprieve Donald Trump’s critics feared most.Trump’s move tonight to commute the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, nearly five months after a federal judge sentenced him to more than three years in prison, was surely the least surprising of his many high-profile acts of executive clemency. The president, after all, had been complaining about Stone’s prosecution from the start; had telegraphed by tweet his displeasure with the Department of Justice’s sentencing recommendation; and had tried to browbeat Judge Amy Berman Jackson into granting Stone a new trial.But the seeming inevitability of Trump’s decision made it no less brazen. Stone was more than a political ally of the president, like Arpaio. He was more than a friend of a friend, like Kerik, Libby, and Milken—whose pardons were encouraged privately by Trump’s buddies or via public endorsements from the president’s fans on Fox News. Stone was a longtime confidant of Trump, but he was more than that. To the president’s critics, he was an accomplice to Trump’s crimes, convicted of lying to Congress and threatening a witness in the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, which directly involved Trump and his campaign. As Jackson noted in explaining her sentence, Stone “was not prosecuted for standing up for the president; he was prosecuted for covering up for the president.”The official reprieve came on a Friday evening. “Roger Stone is a victim of the Russia Hoax that the Left and its allies in the media perpetuated for years in an attempt to undermine the Trump presidency,” read a White House statement explaining Trump’s decision. “Mr. Stone would be put at serious medical risk in prison. He has appealed his conviction and is seeking a new trial. He maintains his innocence and has stated that he expects to be fully exonerated by the justice system.”The president’s clemency power allows him to commute any federal sentence as well as to grant pardons. Because Trump is not fully pardoning Stone, he can proceed with an appeal of his conviction that could allow him to clear his name, at least in the eyes of the law. “Mr. Stone, like every American, deserves a fair trial and every opportunity to vindicate himself before the courts,” the White House said. “The president does not wish to interfere with his efforts to do so.”Jackson, a veteran judge and appointee of former President Barack Obama, knew in February that the punishment she was handing down could very well be quickly and irrevocably lifted by a president who was watching her decision closely. All four prosecutors on Stone’s case had withdrawn from their roles after Attorney General William Barr intervened to force the Justice Department to revise its original sentencing recommendation of seven to nine years. Yet when a new team of prosecutors showed up in court for Stone’s sentencing, they defended their predecessors’ original, harsher request. Jackson pressed the prosecutors to account for the department’s dueling recommendations, but they refused to discuss “internal deliberations.”[Read: A brief history of Roger Stone]Jackson said her decision was not influenced by political pressure. In a lengthy speech before handing down Stone’s sentence, she called out Trump’s comments as “entirely inappropriate.” And she defended the investigation and prosecution of Stone in language that echoed the laments of Trump opponents, who say the president and his allies have waged an assault on the very idea of truth. “The truth still exists. The truth still matters,” she said. “The dismay and disgust at the defendant’s belligerence should transcend party.”Yet ultimately the judge sided with Barr, determining that the prosecutors’ recommendation of a longer sentence was more “than necessary” and giving Stone a prison term less than half as long as the original request. This should not have been a surprise; in March 2019, Jackson gave a similarly mid-range sentence to Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, after his conviction for fraud and other crimes. Yet if Jackson’s sentence offered Trump a way out of using his clemency power, he ignored it.The president did not act when Stone was sentenced but waited until just days before he was report to prison. Citing the coronavirus pandemic, the 67-year-old Stone had asked Judge Jackson if he could delay the start of his sentence—already pushed back from April until June—until September 1. Jackson granted him only a two-week reprieve, but Trump took care of the rest.While not surprised, Democrats nonetheless reacted angrily to the news. “With Trump there are now two systems of justice in America: One for Trump’s criminal friends and one for everyone else,” tweeted Representative Adam Schiff of California, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. Democrats have no plans to try to again impeach a president they hope to defeat in November, but Representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York, the chairman of the party’s House caucus, bluntly warned Trump that he could be indicted as soon as he leaves office.A defining trait of Trump as president is his disdain for constraints of any kind. He has raged at courts that have ruled against him, and he has chafed at—and occasionally gone around—Congress when it ignores his wishes. Trump appears to love his clemency power precisely because it is the most pure and unadulterated authority granted to the president by the Constitution. It is final and unappealable. Congress can’t stop it; a future president can’t undo it; the Supreme Court cannot review it.A while ago now, in the summer of 2018, I asked Democratic Representative Jerry Nadler of New York, who was then vacillating on the question of whether Trump should be impeached, to name something that the president could do that he thought would surely merit his removal from office. Nadler was not yet chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Special Counsel Robert Mueller had not yet delivered his voluminous report on election interference, and Trump had not yet had his fateful phone call with the president of Ukraine. Yet the first example Nadler gave was a pardon.He told me a story about the 1788 convention where Virginia decided to ratify the Constitution. The delegates were discussing the pardon power when one of them suggested that it was too broad and should be narrowed. “What if the president engaged in a criminal conspiracy and pardoned his co-conspirators?” the delegate asked, according to Nadler. “And James Madison answered, ‘Well, that could never happen, because a president who did that would be instantly impeached.’”The Framers, Nadler concluded, “viewed the impeachment power as a limitation on the pardon power.”Tonight, Trump stepped in to save a man convicted of lying to Congress in order to protect the president. And what galls and frustrates his critics is the realization that the one check Congress has on that particular power is the move it has already unsuccessfully deployed.
theatlantic.com
One of Samsung's top-tier QLED TVs just got a huge price drop
Looking to upgrade your home theater? Check out this impressive deal on a top-tier Samsung QLED TV, the Q9 75-inch—find out more.       
usatoday.com
Trump commutes prison sentence for Roger Stone
President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of Roger Stone, a longtime advisor and Republican operative who was convicted of lying to Congress and trying to interfere with a witness during the Russia investigation.
latimes.com
COVID-19 patient was black and paralyzed, so doctors decided his life wasn’t worth saving
Last month, a disabled, 46-year-old African American man was euthanized without his consent or that of his wife. But rather than exploding amid our racial-justice moment, the story hardly yielded a peep from those who control our national discourse. In 2017, Michael Hickson suffered a brain injury that left him paralyzed. Still, he was able...
nypost.com
What you need to know about the Roger Stone case
edition.cnn.com
July 10 coronavirus news
The coronavirus pandemic has brought countries to a standstill. In many places, as countries reopen, Covid-19 cases are on the rise. Follow here for the latest.
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Want a Goya alternative? Try this empanada recipe instead
This vegan empanada recipe includes homemade sazon seasoning, from-scratch discos dough and a picadillo filling.
latimes.com
In South Africa, coronavirus surges as oxygen supplies run low in epicenter
South Africa is seeing a surge of coronavirus cases -- with hospitals reaching capacity and medical oxygen running out.
foxnews.com
Five Guys says employees who refused to serve police have been fired, suspended
A group of Five Guys employees who refused to serve members of an Alabama police force have been fired or suspended, the chain says.      
usatoday.com
Column: Cancel culture is as American as apple pie
It is the view of these 151 signers that cancel culture, stemming from the angry young internet wokes who demand to dominate the direction of the public discourse, is new. That is false.
latimes.com
California could release up to 8,000 prisoners to prevent coronavirus spread, officials say
California will release around 8,000 prison inmates early in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus in state correctional facilities, with more than half expected to return to society by the end of July, officials said Friday. 
foxnews.com
How the dramatic death of Seoul's mayor left a country divided
He was South Korea's second-most powerful official and a potential presidential contender. Now, the death of Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon has left the country divided.
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President Trump commutes Roger Stone’s sentence
President Trump has commuted the sentence of his longtime adviser Roger Stone, a senior administration official told Politico. The commutation comes just days before Stone was due to report to prison Tuesday to serve a 40-month sentence after he was found guilty on seven counts of obstruction, witness tampering and lying to Congress. Stone had...
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nypost.com
President Trump commutes sentence of longtime friend, adviser Roger Stone
President Trump has commuted the sentence of his longtime friend and former campaign adviser Roger Stone, the White House announced on Friday.
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abcnews.go.com
White House announces Trump is granting clemency to Stone
President Donald Trump on Friday commuted the prison sentence of his friend and former political adviser, Roger Stone, days before Stone was set to report to a federal prison in Georgia, according to the White House.
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READ: White House announces Trump is granting clemency to Roger Stone
President Donald Trump on Friday commuted the prison sentence of his friend and former political adviser, Roger Stone, days before Stone was set to report to a federal prison in Georgia, according to the White House.
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edition.cnn.com
How the dramatic death of Seoul's mayor left a country divided
Once South Korea's second-most powerful official and a potential presidential contender, the death of Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon has left the country divided.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence
The GOP political operative was supposed to report to prison next week to serve a 40-month sentence.
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cbsnews.com
The most dishonest, biased new coverage of our lifetimes — and it’s about to get worse
‘I don’t think I’ve ever seen such dishonest and biased coverage of any event.” That was Brit Hume, who has been covering events for more than 50 years for Fox News, ABC News and investigative reporter Jack Anderson. The event was President Trump’s Independence Day speech at Mount Rushmore. The speech was, according to The...
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nypost.com