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Wu-Tang Clan's one-of-a-kind album once owned by Martin Shkreli sold by U.S. Government
Wu-Tang Clan’s one-of-a-kind album was sold to an anonymous buyer in the U.S. in exchange for imprisoned pharmaceutical executive and hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli’s debt.
foxnews.com
All the TV Shows and Movies Coming to Streaming Services in August 2021
Netflix, Hulu and Amazon have some hotly-anticipated releases coming, including "Nine Perfect Strangers," "The Kissing Booth 3" and "American Horror Story."
newsweek.com
Popovich: Olympics 'Transcends All That Petty Crap Between Governments' as U.S. Plays Iran
"The people generally get along, appreciate each other, no matter what country you're talking about," U.S. basketball coach Gregg Popovich said.
newsweek.com
Judge allows vaccinations in place of service hours for people on probation
A judge in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has offered some people on probation the option of getting the coronavirus vaccine instead of serving out court-mandated service hours.
foxnews.com
WorldView: Obama joins NBA Africa as strategic partner, Greece deals with wildfires
In India, at least 18 people are dead and dozens are injured after a truck crashed into a bus that had broken down, reportedly because it was carrying twice its capacity. In Greece, firefighters contained a wildfire just north of Athens that destroyed homes. CBS News foreign correspondent Ian Lee joins "CBSN AM" from London to discuss these and more international headlines.
cbsnews.com
'Pokemon Unite': Gardevoir Added to the Character Roster in Latest Patch
A "fairy-type" character has been added to "Pokemon Unite" in a new update. Here is everything you need to know about Gardevoir's abilities and how to unlock the fighter.
newsweek.com
'I'm a Sleep Therapist, I Can Get Your Baby To Sleep In 30 Seconds'
I suggest techniques to use after you have spotted sleepy cues. That is when the magic happens and you can get your baby to sleep very quickly.
newsweek.com
Simone Biles Highlights The Unique Stresses Athletes Feel At The Tokyo Olympics
Biles' teammates applauded her decision to take care of her mental well-being. But she's not the only athlete who has spoken about the pressures of performing at the Games.
npr.org
NBC's Tokyo Olympics coverage spurs 'advertiser anxiety' as viewership continues to decline
NBC’s primetime coverage of the Tokyo Olympics continued to spiral downward on Monday, averaging 14.7 million viewers for a 49 percent drop compared to the equivalent night from the 2016 Rio de Janeiro games. 
foxnews.com
‘Stillwater,’ with Matt Damon, is four movies in one, and only some of them work
Tom McCcarthy’s latest film is part thriller, part father-daughter psychodrama, part romance and part meditation on America’s changing role.
washingtonpost.com
Rasmussen: Biden Approval Hits New Low, at 46%; 52% Disapprove
A new poll released by Rasmussen Reports on Wednesday morning shows that President Joe Biden's approval rating has dropped to the lowest level of his presidency thus far, at 46%. His disapproval rating is 52%, putting him six points "underwater."
breitbart.com
Instagram defaults 16-and-under teen accounts to ‘private’ now
Meanwhile, there are plans to launch an app created explicitly with tweens and children in mind
nypost.com
Bob Odenkirk Hospitalized After Collapsing on Set of ‘Better Call Saul’
The actor was in the middle of filming the show's final season.
nypost.com
TikTok Star Anthony Barajas Critically Wounded After Being Gunned Down in Movie Theater
18-year-old Rylee Goodrich was killed in the movie theatre shooting, while 19-year-old social media influence Anthony Barajas is currently on life support.
newsweek.com
Court order dashes hopes of teenage DACA applicants
"I feel frustrated that there's significant opposition to giving us an opportunity for something we didn't choose to do. We were kids. We didn't choose this," said 18-year-old Agustin, who applied for DACA this year.
cbsnews.com
She won a gold medal last night. Why she won't look at social media
Australian swimmer Ariarne Titmus, who won two Olympic gold medals at Tokyo 2020 in the 200m and 400m freestyle, talks about why she deleted every social media app on her phone to avoid "external pressure."
edition.cnn.com
The economy is still not back to normal. The Delta variant won't make it easier
America's economy isn't back to normal yet, and much of the recovery depends on consumers: how much they're spending, how much they decide to participate in public life and even whether they work remotely.
edition.cnn.com
Iran's Supreme Leader Says U.S. Is 'Stubborn,' the West 'Enemies,' as Nuclear Talks Stall
"Westerners do not help us, they hit wherever they can," said Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
newsweek.com
Arjan Bhullar suggests ONE Championship make trade for Stipe Miocic: 'I bust you up everywhere'
Arjan Bhullar wants a crack at the consensus greatest UFC heavyweight champion of all time in Stipe Miocic.       Related StoriesArjan Bhullar suggests ONE Championship make trade for Stipe Miocic: 'I bust you up everywhere' - EnclosureUSA TODAY Sports/MMA Junkie rankings, July 27: T.J. Dillashaw makes massive leapUSA TODAY Sports/MMA Junkie rankings, July 27: T.J. Dillashaw makes massive leap - Enclosure 
usatoday.com
Jason Chaffetz: Dems' spending spree – here's how the states can take charge of our financial fate
With another debt ceiling deadline approaching at the end of July, everyone's least favorite subject will again rear its ugly head: our financial fate.
foxnews.com
US women's 3-on-3 basketball team makes history with gold medal in sport's Olympic debut
The Americans stormed out to a 7-2 lead and never looked back during Wednesday's final against the Russians in the 3-on-3 basketball debut.       
usatoday.com
US Gymnast Sunisa Lee: 'We Do Not Owe Anyone a Gold Medal'
In the aftermath of Simone Biles's completely unexpected withdrawal from the team and individual events at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, US gymnast Sunisa Lee has stepped forward to tell Americans exactly what they want to hear from their Olympic competitors: that Team USA does not "owe anyone a gold medal."
breitbart.com
Liz Cheney rebukes GOP leadership after first January 6 hearing
Rep. Liz Cheney, one of just two Republicans on the select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, excoriated her party's leadership on Tuesday for its continued defense of former President Donald Trump's role in the attack on the US Capitol.
edition.cnn.com
Luis Grijalva qualified to run for the Tokyo Olympics. His DACA status almost stopped him.
NAU's Luis Grijalva is a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which makes traveling abroad difficult.       
usatoday.com
13 percent of released migrants appear at ICE offices, report says
Just 13 percent of the roughly 50,000 illegal immigrants released in the US without a court date — and ordered to report to Immigration and Customs Enforcement — have showed up, a report said. ​
nypost.com
Justice Department declines to represent GOP congressman in January 6 suit
The Justice Department said it inciting an attack on the Capitol, as alleged in the lawsuit against Brooks, falls outside the scope of a lawmakers' employment.
cbsnews.com
Doctor shares strong, unexpected bond with NICU nurse who cared for him decades ago
Nurse Vilma Wong and Dr. Brandon Seminatore both work in the neonatal intensive care unit at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. But they first met there years before, under very different circumstances. Mireya Villarreal has the story about their unexpected bond.
cbsnews.com
U.S. women defeat ROC to win gold in 3-on-3 basketball
The U.S. won gold in the first ever Olympics women's 3-on-3 basketball tournament, defeating the Russian Olympic Committee 18-15.
latimes.com
Former USA Gymnast Dominique Dawes on Simone Biles, athlete mental health
Former USA Gymnast and Olympic Gold Medalist Dominique Dawes joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss Simone Biles’ decision to withdraw from some competitions in Tokyo.
cbsnews.com
PBS children’s show ‘Arthur’ to end after record 25 seasons
Based on Brown's "Arthur Adventure" book series, the show followed a bespectacled aardvark and the valuable lessons he learned from family and friends.
nypost.com
Delta Variant Threat Looms, U.S. COVID Cases More Than Double in a Week
Estimated daily COVID-19 case counts are projected to peak by late August, while the reported daily death toll could peak by mid-September.
newsweek.com
U.S. 3x3 Women's Basketball Takes Gold In The Sport's Olympic Debut
The U.S. women's team took an early lead against the Russians and maintained it the entire game. The action unfolds over just 10 minutes — or the first to 21 points if that happens more quickly.
npr.org
The long road to a reckoning on racist team names
Owner Paul Dolan announces the name change of the Cleveland baseball team on July 23, 2021. | Tony Dejak/AP Photo I worked for a Native American advocacy group. Getting a sports team like Cleveland’s to change its name was the hardest part of my job. I have been to innumerable Washington, DC, receptions, but I will always remember one in 2017. I was in the middle of a benign conversation with a lobbyist when he asked the dreaded question, “What do you do?” I told him I worked at a Native American advocacy organization and focused on issues of agriculture and retiring Native mascots. “Mascots, like the Redskins?” he replied. “Aren’t there bigger issues you can work on?” I told him I do work on other things. I was also coordinating efforts around the Bears Ears National Monument, a public land designation protecting Native cultural resources and lands in Utah that the Trump administration was close to removing. “But fighting for things like Bears Ears doesn’t matter if lawmakers, their staff, and their lobbyists don’t see Native people as humans,” I told him. “If they see us as cartoons on the sides of helmets and ball caps, they’ll never see me as an equal in the congressional hearing room.” He gave me a weird look. “It should be seen as an honor,” he said, then he walked off. He believed equating an entire race of people, my people, to an animal or a sports token was a compliment. I wanted to be seen as a person, and he wanted a way out of the conversation. On July 23, American sports took a step toward treating my people as human.Major League Baseball and the Cleveland team announced it would stop using the team name — the Indians — and replace it with the Guardians. While a video, narrated by Tom Hanks, made no amends or mention of its previous mascot, the Cleveland team noted that “Cleveland was always the best part of our name.” But it wasn’t so long ago that changing the team’s name felt far out of reach. As a former policy analyst for the National Congress of American Indians, I worked for years on trying to eliminate mascots — and of all the policy fights and advocacy battles in Indian Country,Native mascots was the hardest issue I ever worked on. This is because it centers on how people see other people. It is about perception. People don’t like being told that their perception is filtered through racism. We had tried just about everything to get the National Football League to change the name of the Washington team, and they would not budge. Tribal leaders met with the team and NFL management numerous times. We organized social media campaigns.Activists even put together a culture jam and created an entire online presence for the “Washington Redhawks,” an intentional misdirection to get the team to state that they wouldn’t change their racist name. But rallies and pieces on Comedy Central could only get us so far. Washington owner Dan Snyder told us and the press that “we will never change the name. It’s that simple. NEVER — you can use caps.”(The team did eventually retire their name during the heat of the Black Lives Matter protests in 2020; they have yet to name the replacement mascot.) Back in 2017, however, tackling the NFL seemed impossible, so I turned to Major League Baseball. MLB had introduced the “block C” logo for the Cleveland Indians and wore it during games, but you could still buy merchandise featuring their longtime mascot, Chief Wahoo, up until the end of the 2018 season. For the unfamiliar,Chief Wahoo is a caricature of a Native American man. His nose is big and cartoonish, his skin is ruby red. He looks less like the Native American men I know and more like what an 1800s vaudeville cartoonist would draw. Chief Wahoo is a representation of what colonialism wanted Native people to be — a grinning clown in the image of Little Black Sambo, something of the past, not real people. Every time the Cleveland Indians played the Detroit Tigers, nearly 5 million Native Americans were put on a level playing field with an animal. If Native people are equal to animals, how will we be seen as equal to our fellow human beings in the courts, in Congress, and on the streets? Why would a non-Native person care about the intricacies of Indian law and tribal sovereignty, when they see a Cowboy beat a Redskin on a football field while their family eats Thanksgiving dinner? Why would a student see their Native classmate as fully human when 1,879 schools in America still use Native mascots? When the team stopped using Wahoo, we were told at the National Congress of American Indians that the name would come next, but they wouldn’t say when. Everyone in Indian Country has been told to wait many times before. We’ve waited for treaty rights to be upheld, for decisions in endless court battles, to be recognized as the sovereign nations we are. This didn’t seem any different. Fans, and others like the DC lobbyist, have argued that naming teams and mascots after Native people is an honor. These “honors” came from the late 19th century, a bleak era in Native American history. Around the same time the first professional baseball leagues started up after the Civil War, the devastating Allotment Era and Reservation Era forced Native people off their traditional lands and into poverty or boarding schools.Native American populations were at their lowest numbers — 248,000 in 1890. With Native people seen as a vanishing race, “honoring” these soon-to-be-forgotten people seemed like the decent thingfor America, including sports teams, to do. While the true origin of the name the Cleveland Indians is unclear, the story most often told is that of a naming contest held by the team, then known as Naps after player Nap Lajoie. An eager young fan wanted to honor former Cleveland star Louis Sockalexis (Penobscot), the first Native American to play professionally and former member of the team, for his contributions to Cleveland baseball. The team accepted this entry in 1915 and the name stuck for the next 106 years. But that feel-good telling is disingenuous. Sockalexis was booed and his heritage was made fun of from his first day in the league. Fans mocked his culture, greeting him with war whoops and by imitating dances. He earned his spot on the team based on his merits, but was only seen as the butt of a joke. When the team name was later tied solely to Sockalexis’s race, it was not to honor his individual accomplishments as a player. It was to continue the mockery that met Sockalexis on day one. Since the 1960s, Native activists have been fighting for the retirement of “Indian” mascots. They have told team owners and the general public that reducing us to cartoons demeans us, that seeing us as mascots humiliates us, that it hurts the self-esteem of our young ones. Nothing changed. But in the past year, the Washington Football Team (name still TBD) and now the Cleveland team have toppled like dominoes. A change this big could have only happened during a time when the country has shifted toward a reckoning with racism. The George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020led to people buying anti-racist books in droves, to corporations adopting diversity initiatives for the first time, to serious conversations about race on TV shows and at dinner tables. Polls in the summer of 2020 showed that 67 percent of Americans acknowledged that racism is a big problem in society. Still, people have a hard time understanding racism when it is not tied to violence or economics. Racism tied to perception is the hardest to unpack. Everyone likes to think that their perceptions are fair and unbiased. It’s tough enough for people to admit that they have privilege in a racist system. It’s even harder to convince people that the blinders from that racist system have taught them to see others as less than human. The discussion becomes not about what we see — we all see a red cartoon character in a baseball cap — it is about how we see. I see Wahoo as a caricature of who society wants me to be — stuck in the past and almost extinct — ignoring who I really am: an educated Native American woman, proud of the people I come from, living in 2021. The lobbyist at the reception saw Wahoo as an honor to a dying race of people who have bigger problems than changing his perception. But changing perception matters. Changing perception puts pressure on institutions to do better. If Americans had always seen Native people as humans, we would have never had to fight these mascot battles.We could have actually focused all of our attentionon rebuilding our communities. Maria Givens is an enrolled member of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe (Schitsu’umsh) in northern Idaho. She has a master’s degree in environmental issues from the University of Colorado and has worked for the National Congress of American Indians and in the US Senate. She is passionate about tribal food sovereignty and shares pictures of Native food on her Instagram.
vox.com
Lindsie Chrisley and Will Campbell split again after 9 years of marriage
They previously separated in 2014 and 2016 and hit a rough patch in 2019 when Chrisley was accused of having affairs with two "Bachelorette" alums.
nypost.com
The critical lesson Simone Biles can teach us
Rewind to that moment when Simone Biles, without question the greatest gymnast of all time, landed a vault awkwardly in the team competition at the Olympics.
edition.cnn.com
Trump rewards Ken Paxton's support with key endorsement in Texas GOP primary
Ex-President Donald Trump has endorsed longtime backer Ken Paxton for a third term as Texas attorney general. George P. Bush is running against him.      
usatoday.com
What does Matt Damon think about Bennifer 2.0?
Matt Damon told “Extra” on Monday that he is “so happy” for his best friend, Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez, who have been dating since the spring. The actor said, “He deserves every happiness in the world. I’m glad for both of them.” Back in May, Damon played coy when asked about their romance but...
nypost.com
Housing advocates fear lifting federal eviction ban could lead to COVID-19 surge
Millions of Americans could face homelessness as a federal eviction moratorium comes to an end this week. Housing advocates are raising concerns over a surge in evictions, saying it could trigger another wave of COVID-19 as the Delta variant fuels new infections. CBS MoneyWatch reporter Irina Ivanova joined "CBSN AM" to discuss.
cbsnews.com
Iran's Khamenei accuses US of being 'malicious' in nuclear talks
Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei accused the U.S. of being "obstinate" in nuclear talks, claiming the Biden administration is not lifting sanctions as promised.
foxnews.com
Animated Children’s Series ‘Arthur’ Ending After 25 Seasons on PBS
The night the lights went out in Elwood City.
nypost.com
The DOJ Won't Defend Rep. Mo Brooks In Court Against Claims He Incited Jan. 6 Riot
A civil lawsuit accuses Brooks, an Alabama Republican, of helping incite a pro-Trump mob into storming the Capitol on Jan. 6. Named alongside Brooks in the suit is former President Trump and others.
npr.org
Rep. Jordan appears to acknowledge speaking with Trump on Jan. 6
The Ohio Republican’s comments during a Fox News interview make it more likely he will be called as a witness by the House select committee probing the attack on the Capitol by a pro-Trump mob.
washingtonpost.com
Infrastructure talks stuck in limbo but back from the brink
After bipartisan infrastructure talks went to the brink Monday, negotiators are trying to put things back on track, returning to the arduous work of ironing out their remaining differences, recommitted to the painstaking work that has to be done if this group is ever going to clinch a deal.
edition.cnn.com
Britney Spears is 'feeling overwhelmed' so she took to painting
With so much going on regarding her conservatorship Britney Spears is looking to decompress.
edition.cnn.com
Britney Spears is 'feeling overwhelmed' so she took to painting
With so much going on regarding her conservatorship Britney Spears is looking to decompress.
edition.cnn.com
Britney Spears is 'feeling overwhelmed' so she took to painting
With so much going on regarding her conservatorship Britney Spears is looking to decompress.
edition.cnn.com
‘I Can Die.’ Medvedev Survives Extreme Heat at Tokyo Games
Daniil Medvedev struggled with the suffocating heat and humidity at the Ariake Tennis Park in Tokyo
time.com
Jan. 6 police officers give a master class on the dangers of right-wing extremism
The officers' testimony made it clear that right-wing extremism is a threat to our democracy.
washingtonpost.com