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Alitalia prima in Europa per aiuti di Stato: prenderà 141 euro a passeggero (a Ryanair solo 5)

Alitalia prima in Europa per aiuti di Stato: prenderà 141 euro a passeggero (a Ryanair solo 5)

Analisi del «Corriere» sui soldi stanziati dai governi per superare la crisi coronavirus. In cima anche Air France e Lufthansa. L’esperto: per Alitalia occasione unica per ripartire


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Letters to the Editor: Black voters and everyone else have more than enough reasons to support Joe Biden
Trump says the Democrats play "plantation politics." To that, one reader says Trump and the Republicans are playing "genocidal politics."
latimes.com
Op-Ed: Lessons in preparedness from a high-risk fire zone
Living in Topanga means being prepared for fires. Topanga Coalition for Emergency Preparedness, a volunteer group, has it down to a science.
latimes.com
Op-Ed: In Venus' clouds there's phosphine. Phosphine stinks. But its discovery lifts my heart.
If Venusian phosphine is what we hope it is — well, that's a spark of joy in hellish times.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: Fine, stay in Europe. We'll be here to care for our fellow Californians
A UC Berkeley professor contemplates staying in Finland instead of returning to fire-ravaged California. How very American of him.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: No gas cars in California? What's next from Newsom, an order forcing the sun to shine?
We can't even get through extreme heat waves without blackouts. What will happen when everyone in California is plugging in an electric vehicle?
latimes.com
D.C.-area forecast: Warm and humid later today and tomorrow, before midweek rain ushers in cooler conditions
Summer’s not done with us quite yet.
washingtonpost.com
An examination of The Times' failures on race, our apology and a path forward
As the U.S. confronts systemic racism, so does the Los Angeles Times. Through the paper's history, it often showed at best a blind spot, at worst outright hostility, for nonwhite Angelenos — rooted and reflected in a glaring shortage of people of color on staff.
latimes.com
A Black reporter recalls racism in the newsroom and finally gets his day of reckoning
The writer revisits a painful memory from 1992, comparing it to his father's trauma and the current firestorm at the Los Angeles Times.
latimes.com
Two pioneering reporters demonstrated the importance of covering all parts of L.A.
When the 1965 civil unrest in Watts began, The Times still had no Black reporters or editors. What it did have was a Black advertising messenger who described what he saw going on in his neighborhood.
latimes.com
Op-Ed: The stakes in Tuesday's presidential debate are high. Can Trump and Biden rise to the occasion?
I'm terrified that the 90-minute encounter will reinforce the perception that our democracy is toxic and our political system is broken beyond repair.
latimes.com
Voices from The Times newsroom past and present on issues of race
As the U.S. confronts systemic racism, Los Angeles Times staffers past and present reflect on how race and racism has affected the newsroom and its coverage.
latimes.com
The Times' reckoning on race and our commitment to meaningful change
Los Angeles Times owner Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, in a letter to readers, says this news organization can succeed only to the degree it engages, examines and accurately reflects the city and the region.
latimes.com
How do you cover a group as diverse as Asian Americans in Southern California?
The Times once ran alarmist stories about "heathen Chinee" and supported the incarceration Japanese Americans during World War II. We've since made headway, but we still need to improve coverage of Asian Americans.
latimes.com
Op-Ed: I was an activist in the '60s. Here's my advice to Portland's protesters
A veteran of the antiwar and civil rights movements of the 1960s urges Portland protesters to focus on changing minds, not burning down buildings.
latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: Adam Schiff's democracy reforms won't work without the people's righteous anger
Passing laws to constrain the president won't do much good when a lawless administration aided by a lawless attorney general is in power.
latimes.com
Navigating the complexities of race in L.A. — and in The Times' newsroom — as a young, Black reporter
Sandy Banks arrived in Los Angeles to work at The Times at 24, never having known anyone who wasn't Black or white. The polyglot dynamic she encountered both fascinated and bewildered her.
latimes.com
For Latinos and the L.A. Times, a complicated past — and a promising future
Over the last 139 years, Los Angeles Times readers have seen in their newspaper the best and worst of how the American media have covered Latinos.
latimes.com
Joe Biden Should Promise to Pack the Supreme Court to Save It From Partisan Wars
The fierce political gamesmanship over Ruth Bader Ginsburg's seat could ultimately be good for our country and for the Court too. Here's why
newsweek.com
Critic Charles Finch on Reading Hundreds of Books a Year
For book reviews, for research, and even for fun.
slate.com
Driver in BLM 'Caravan of Justice' Who Rammed Her Car Into Trump Supporters Arrested
Tatiana Turner is accused of driving into counter-protesters at an event demanding justice for Breonna Taylor.
newsweek.com
Do you really need to rent a cable box? No, there's an app for that
You can ditch the box, cut the cable bill and save money by using pay TV apps that stream their channels over a broadband to your TV, phone or tablet.      
usatoday.com
Seattle driver doing 'doughnuts' near Space Needle hits several spectators: report
A Seattle driver illegally doing "doughnut" spins on a street near the Space Needle on Saturday evening slammed into several people in a crowd that had gathered to watch the spectacle, according to a local reporter. 
foxnews.com
Breonna Taylor death left officer immediately fearing he’d lose job, ex-chief testified: report
Det. Brett Hankison, the since-fired Louisville police officer who now faces charges in connection with the Breonna Taylor case, was “visibly shaking” soon after the March drug raid that left Taylor dead -- and feared losing his job, a city police chief – who also lost his job -- testified soon after the incident.
foxnews.com
LAPD Officer Pistol Whipped Inside His Police Precinct, Suspect Shot At
The suspect disarmed an officer during an altercation that took place inside a police station in San Pedro, California, according to LAPD Chief Michel Moore.
newsweek.com
This would be Biden's first foreign policy challenge if he were to win the election
edition.cnn.com
Everything coming to and leaving Netflix in October 2020
The streaming platform is helping its users gear up for the holiday this October by adding a bevy of spooky content to its library.
1 h
foxnews.com
Leslie Marshall: On Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett would threaten rights of millions of Americans
Conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett, who President Trump nominated Saturday to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, could play a key role in changing American life for many years to come.
1 h
foxnews.com
Six conservative justices? 10 ways the Supreme Court could change
If President Trump and Senate Republicans can get a 6-3 conservative majority on the Supreme Court, it will mark the biggest change there since 1991.        
1 h
usatoday.com
'I Was Attacked By An 8ft Alligator in Florida'
The alligator began to try and pull me back into the water. I was trying to pull back away from him, too. Because when an alligator has its grip on you, their next move is to try and do a death roll.
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newsweek.com
Can Foreign Powers Help the Belarus Prodemocracy Movement Without Undermining It?
When Alexander Lukashenko began to face the biggest challenge yet to his 26-year rule of Belarus, he attributed it to only one thing: Western meddling.“We have managed to take steps to anticipate and thwart a major plan to destabilize Belarus,” the longtime president said in the run-up to last month’s disputed elections. “The masks have been ripped off the puppets we have here and the puppet masters, who are sitting beyond Belarus’s borders.”Absent from this narrative, of course, are all the other things that could have prompted hundreds of thousands of people to take to the streets for seven consecutive weeks: the botched handling of the pandemic, which Lukashenko erroneously claimed would kill no one in Belarus; Lukashenko’s assertion that women are constitutionally unfit for the role of president; the government’s violent crackdowns on peaceful protests and Lukashenko’s threat to bring in Russian troops to quell them further. (He doesn’t appear to mind foreign involvement so long as he has invited it.)As far as narratives go, though, this can be an effective one. When regimes the likes of Lukashenko’s cry foreign interference in mass protests, every expression of outside sympathy can be repackaged and reframed as akin to intervention, giving autocrats the pretext to quash dissent, even if doing so requires force. The Belarusian opposition, led by Lukashenko’s primary opponent, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, is well aware of this—so much so, in fact, that she has gone to great lengths to stress that these protests are neither pro-Russia nor pro–European Union. “Our revolution is not geopolitical,” Tikhanovskaya said in a recent op-ed in The New York Times. “It is a democratic revolution.”The question then becomes: How can foreign powers support the Belarusian prodemocracy movement without undermining it?[Read: What Belarus learned from the rest of the world]Framing dissent as a product of foreign interference is a well-tested tactic in the autocratic playbook. It’s how Russian President Vladimir Putin dismissed protests against him in the run-up to local elections last year. The same argument was made by Chinese authorities in response to the ongoing prodemocracy movement in Hong Kong, which Beijing portrayed as funded by the West.Lukashenko trumpeted this argument well before the August 9 election, in which he purports to have secured 80 percent of the vote (a result that has widely been dismissed by observers both within and outside the country as rigged). Though many countries expressed concern about the eruption of state violence in Belarus after the vote, it wasn’t until Lukashenko’s inauguration, which was held this week in a secret ceremony in Minsk, that many countries began to formally declare the longtime leader’s rule illegitimate, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Ukraine, Denmark, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, and Slovakia. Lithuania took its rejection of Lukashenko’s rule one step further by formally recognizing Tikhanovskaya and the opposition’s coordination council as “the only legitimate representatives of the Belarusian people.”That most countries haven’t gone as far as Lithuania has is, in some ways, to the Belarusian opposition’s advantage: Though Tikhanovskaya has become the symbol of the prodemocracy movement in the country, she has long stressed that her desire is not to lead Belarus, but rather to ensure that it gets free and fair elections. By recognizing Tikhanovskaya as the legitimate president, Lithuania has inadvertently created a conundrum similar to that faced by the U.S. and other countries when they opted to formally recognize Juan Guaidó as the rightful Venezuelan president, despite Nicolás Maduro’s firm entrenchment in power: The symbolism is strong, but it does little to actually effect change, let alone counter the narrative that the West is meddling in affairs that are not its own.[Read: In Washington, the Venezuelan opposition has already won]Tikhanovskaya, for her part, isn’t asking the world to recognize her leadership. She is asking for something more substantial: sanctions. In a meeting with EU leaders in Brussels this week, she urged the bloc to focus its sanctions on individuals involved in the election’s falsification and the subsequent violent crackdown on protesters. The primary goal, she said, is to pressure Lukashenko to enter into a dialogue with the coordination council, the majority of whose members have been detained or forced to flee Belarus. (Lukashenko has so far ruled out meeting with the council, which he has accused of attempting a “coup” against him.)Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko holds up his fist during a rally. (Valery Sharifulin / TASS / Getty)Some of these sanctions have already started to materialize. Lithuania was the first to impose travel bans on Lukashenko and dozens of other Belarusian officials. Britain announced this week that, in coordination with the U.S. and Canada, it too would be preparing sanctions against “those responsible for serious human rights violations.” The EU is also considering its own sanctions, though it has so far failed to secure the necessary unanimity among its members to implement them—a challenge the bloc’s foreign-policy chief, Josep Borrell, said puts “our credibility … at stake.”[Read: The women at the center of the Belarus protests]Sanctions undoubtedly apply more pressure on Lukashenko than statements alone. And rooting them in Belarusian authorities’ human-rights violations, as the U.K. has, makes them harder to unpick for Lukashenko, whose violent response to the peaceful demonstrations has been widely documented.Perhaps the easiest way for foreign governments to support Belarus’s prodemocracy movement without undermining it is by focusing on the one thing Lukashenko has pinned his legitimacy on: the will of the Belarusian people. So far, Lukashenko’s narrative has rested on the notion that he alone claims the support of the majority of Belarusians, irrespective of what the independent media or the demonstrations might suggest. By coming out in favor of Belarusians’ right to decide the fate of their country in free and fair elections, foreign governments can support them without feeding into Lukashenko’s narrative of meddling.“Nobody else but the People of Belarus have the ultimate right to decide the destiny of their country,” the presidents of Romania, Poland, and Lithuania said in a joint statement. Though Lukashenko might dislike the messengers, he would be hard pressed to condemn the message.Still, when I asked Maryia Martysevich, a Belarusian writer and board member of the Belarusian PEN Centre, how foreign governments could go about helping Belarus without appearing to interfere, she told me their approach may not even matter. “He would invent [the interference] even if nothing happens.”
1 h
theatlantic.com
Trump won’t commit to respecting the vote: ‘No one knows what will happen in the next few months.’
A famous scholar of democracy worries that America is in deep trouble.
2 h
washingtonpost.com
Officer injured during shooting incident at police station
A police officer has been shot and wounded in a late-night incident at a Los Angeles County Police Department.
2 h
abcnews.go.com
The sinister truth behind Britain's stately homes
Grand buildings replete with turrets, picture windows and kitchen gardens. Perfectly manicured lawns. And hundreds of rooms stuffed with antiques and objet d'arts from across the globe.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
Who Are The Proud Boys? Counter-Protest Against Black Lives Matter in Portland Ends
The far-right group's rally in Oregon did not see as large a turnout as feared by police and city officials.
2 h
newsweek.com
What Barrett's nomination could mean for US law
2 h
edition.cnn.com
Nationals fans lost their ballpark this season. They lost their World Series celebration, too.
Has baseball been this soothing lighthouse, a guide toward a sliver of normal in the novel coronavirus pandemic? Or, in Washington, did it only lead to more stress?
2 h
washingtonpost.com
5 answers to common tech questions revealed
A woman called her company’s tech support desk, and the technician asked for her password.
2 h
foxnews.com
A pandemic upended their communities, so these teen inventors built apps to make life easier
Young inventors who have turned their attention to fighting a global pandemic that has infected more than 32 million and claimed nearly a million lives.
2 h
edition.cnn.com
A pandemic upended their communities, so these teen inventors built apps to make life easier
Riya Shah walked into her high school without knowing it would be her last day in person.
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edition.cnn.com
Seattle police arrest 10 for assaulting cops, smashing windows, setting fires
Seattle police made at least 10 arrests Saturday evening when Breonna Taylor protests devolved into chaos and violence as demonstrators set fires and damaged property and allegedly committed assaults in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.
2 h
foxnews.com
Boredom prompts half of Americans to start holiday shopping early, study claims
It’s always such a relief to have Christmas shopping done before Halloween.
2 h
foxnews.com
Powerball Results, Numbers for 9/26/20: Did Anyone Win the $25 Million?
The winning numbers in Saturday evening's drawing of the Powerball were 11, 21, 27, 36, and 62. The Powerball was 24 and the Power Play was X3.
2 h
newsweek.com
Israel Adesanya breaks down UFC 253 masterpiece against 'dumb' Paulo Costa
Israel Adesanya is wasting no time turning the page after a flawless title defense against Paulo Costa at UFC 253.        Related StoriesNow champion, Jan Blachowicz still eyes Jon Jones: 'He promised me this fight'UFC 253 results: Israel Adesanya mauls Paulo Costa, retains middleweight titleUFC 253 results: Israel Adesanya mauls Paulo Costa, retains middleweight title - Enclosure 
3 h
usatoday.com
The Kleptocrats’ Money-Laundering Middleman Who Did Deals With Trump
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty ImagesKleptopia: How Dirty Money is Conquering the World is the terrifying true story of how kleptocrats—those who rule through corruption—are uniting, clandestinely fusing their business interests, and forming alliances. From Budapest to Beijing, Harare to Riyadh, they have seized power and are busily guzzling their nations’ wealth. There is nothing they will not do to maintain control. Those who dare to cross them are massacred on the Kazakh steppe and brutalized during Zimbabwe’s sham elections; those who threaten to spill their secrets have their mouths permanently closed. Read more at The Daily Beast.
3 h
thedailybeast.com
LAPD officer 'grazed' in head by bullet inside police station; suspect in custody: reports
A suspect was in custody Saturday night after a Los Angeles police officer was struck in the head by a bullet inside the department’s Harbor Station in San Pedro, according to reports.
3 h
foxnews.com
‘Fargo’ Turns Chris Rock Into Fall TV’s Biggest Dramatic Actor
Elizabeth Morris/FXChris Rock’s greatest performances are as Chris Rock.There’s his stand-up comedy, and the many times he’s played himself, or versions of himself, Woody Allen-style, on TV and in movies: Louie, Top Five, I Think I Love My Wife... Don’t be fooled. Those are great performances, deftly allowing the indelible, too-large-to-stifle “Chris Rock-ness” to breathe through the characters. But they’re also a testament to how hard it is to forget that you’re watching Chris Rock, no matter how great an acting turn he’s giving.That adds another layer to the intrigue in the fact that he’s starring in the new season of Fargo, which launches on FX Sunday night.Read more at The Daily Beast.
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thedailybeast.com
Leader of India Says Country’s Vaccine Industry Will ‘Help All Humanity’
A study offered an explanation for children’s ability to fight off the virus. The lockdown in Melbourne, Australia, is being further eased.
3 h
nytimes.com
Steve Bannon’s Dodgy Nonprofit Teamed Up With Company Linked to Accused Gold Scammers
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty/ShutterstockWhen former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon’s nonprofit sought to restore an American golden age, it turned to a company with connections to a consortium that allegedly strip-mined the retirement accounts of elderly conservatives, The Daily Beast has discovered.Bannon’s “economic nationalist” group Citizens of the American Republic hired the Wyoming-based firm Platinum Advertising Corporation in 2018 to handle its “websites/social media,” Internal Revenue Service records show. A tangle of corporate and legal documents ties Platinum Advertising to TMTE Inc.—a precious metal dealer accused on Friday of fraudulently extracting $185 million from senior citizens by selling them overpriced bullion.The massive joint action the federal Commodity Futures Trading Commission and 30 states announced against TMTE alleged that the Los Angeles-based company had suckered 1,600 mostly silver-haired victims into sinking their life savings into precious metals sold at up to 300 percent of their market value. The charges are familiar to anybody who has followed the long trail of news reports and regulatory actions describing how TMTE—which has variously used the monikers Access Unlimited, TEM, Chase Metals, and Metals.com—cashed in on the right-wing paranoia of the Trump era.Read more at The Daily Beast.
3 h
thedailybeast.com